Dash Mining - How to Mine Dash in 2020? | Dash Mining Guide

I have access to a cluster with a few pretty fast GPU's (Tesla S1070). Should I get into bitcoin mining?

The cluster is shared, but I have a preferred subscription, meaning I get some sort of preference in the queue. Would it be worth my time to hog the GPU nodes and mine bitcoins? Here's the wiki page for the GPU.
I have light programming knowledge (mostly research based though). If anyone thinks it'd be worth setting up, I'd be willing to pay you to help me out.
submitted by MayContainPeanuts to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

To build a processing power beast.

Problem: I am running python codes for a few million iterations and my computer can't handle the workload. It ends up crashing and and my CPU and Memory usage are through the roof. (Specs: i5-7200U CPU 2.50 GHz 2.70 GHz, 8G RAM)
Solutions I am thinking: 1) Build a cluster computer from Raspberry Pis but I dont know how to calculate how many Pis (nodes) I need and if this is the best solution. 2) Build a custom computer but I am not sure what specs I need. I am aware that people in bitcoin mining use crazy FLOP rates and I thought I can use a similar product to run my programming project however, I am confused because some use CPU/GPU methods and others use strong graphic cards.
I will only use the new computer system to run my programming codes i.e. no requirements for gaming, movies etc.
I welcome any ideas you might have and would love some help.
submitted by Dr-Maverick to buildapc [link] [comments]

Former Fed Employee Fined for Installing Bitcoin Software on Fed Server

Former Fed Employee Fined for Installing Bitcoin Software on Fed Server submitted by BobAlison to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

FPGA Mining

A FPGA opensource miner has just been released running at 80Mhps but at a cost of $585. The efficiency is stated below quoted from a post in the thread.
At 80 MHps, I will need at least 3 of these to achieve a single 5830 hashrate. That is $595.-x 3 = $1785.- at full price, vs. $190.- for the 5830.
Giving the 5830 is consuming $11.- a month in electricity, and assuming this board will consume zero electricity, it will take more than 145 months, or 12 years to recover the investment, always comparing to a 5830.
BUT:
In this thread, someone mentioned he is doing 210Mhash/sec after some optimization but he will cease public posting of his development.
Apologies but no more development information will be posted. I've been offered a 25% share from someone that owns 2 FPGA clusters. If you haven't seen that type of hardware before think a 156 FPGAs per machine.
From those posts what we can understand is that the factors that affect FPGA now are high procurement cost, low running cost and ease of scalability . What this means is that with the increasing total hash rate of the network (30Ghash/day last difficultly adjustment) the question becomes when would the difficulty render GPU inefficient in contrast to running cost?
Remember to take into account FPGAs are usually run in clusters and even though it would not be beneficial to buy one outright, those who have access to FPGA are the first movers and eventual dominant forces of the mining market.
Of course, in the end, ASIC is where it's at. Anyone? =D
Edit: read more stuff, added info.
submitted by Coz131 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Link Collection - All Recent Core Team Communications (incl. Roadmap)

Last updated: Mar 29th, 2018

2 important things first:

General Note

Table of contents

  1. Communications
  2. Guides & Instructional links
  3. Key people to follow on Twitter
  4. Dash Core is hiring
  5. Quarterly Summaries
  6. Notable Core Team Proposals
  7. Dash Whitepapers
  8. Dash Technology Peer-reviewed
  9. Addendum: Misconceptions on Dash cleared up

Communications

  1. The birth of Dash's Governance: Self-sustainable Decentralized Governance by Blockchain
  2. 'We're Doing the Planning That Takes Us to 1 Billion" - Ryan Taylor, Dash Director of Finance
  3. The philosophy behind the DASH reward split by (now) Dash Core CEO Ryan Taylor
  4. Dash's Ryan Taylor at TNABC Bitcoin Miami 2017 (Best presentation on Dash so far!)
  5. What is DASH & Where Is It Going? 2017 DASH Open House
  6. Hong Kong | Research and Planning - by Evan Duffield
  7. Dash Roadmap to Evolution
  8. How To Enable On-Chain Scaling by Evan Duffield
  9. DFN - Interview with Evan on Dash's Roadmap
  10. Open Letter From Evan and Ryan Regarding Dash Marketing
  11. Wachsman PR - Q2 project closure report
  12. Interview With The Crypto Show! - Evan Duffield
  13. Dash Improvement Proposal No. 1 - DIP001
  14. Important information regarding wallet backups
  15. Dash Labs Network Update
  16. Copay Wallet going into closed Alpha Testing
  17. 1st Annual Dash Conference: London Keynote Professional HQ Recording
  18. DASH – DIGITAL CASH by Robert Wiecko at SWITCH! 2017
  19. Crucial information to all proposal owners: Do NOT use multisig addresses as payout destinations!
  20. Interview With Ryan Taylor, The CEO Of Dash Core Team
  21. Ryan Taylor at the World Blockchain Forum
  22. Ryan Taylor interview with Crypto Trader (MSNBC Africa)
  23. Dash Core Community Update
  24. Dash Core 12.2 Release
  25. Dash CEO Ryan Taylor: „Dash is in many ways a better Bitcoin“
  26. Update from Dash Core on Business Development
  27. How DASH is resistant to retargeting issues
  28. Dash presentation at the Euro Finance Tech in Frankfurt by essra
  29. Link collection of Dash's 2017 achievements
  30. What Is a DAO and Why Is It Revolutionary?
  31. Dash: The First DAO
  32. Welcome Bradley Zastrow - Director of Global Business Development
  33. Interview with Ryan Taylor, IR4 Podcast #12 (January 2018)
  34. Chuck Williams at Anarchapulco 2018 on Dash
  35. Dash Force Podcast E42 with Chuck Williams on Dash Evolution
  36. Evolution Demo #1 - The First Dash DAP
  37. Dash Force Podcast E43 - Feat. Fernando Gutierrez (Dash Core CMO)
  38. Our New Approach to Communications with the Community
  39. Dash Community Q&A - March 29th, 2018

Guides & Instructional links

  1. Dash Developer Documentation
  2. Upgrade Instructions for Masternodes (12.2)
  3. Upgrade Instructions for End Users (12.2)
  4. Upgrade Instructions for Masternodes (12.1)
  5. Upgrade Instructions for End Users (12.1)
  6. Paper Wallet Setup Guide
  7. Trezor Guide for Masternode Operators
  8. 8 Steps to a Successful Proposal
  9. Masternode Boot Camp by solarguy2003
  10. DASH 101 Video Series

Key people to follow on Twitter

  1. Ryan Taylor, CEO of Dash Core Inc.
  2. Fernando Gutierrez, CMO of Dash Core Inc.
  3. Bradley Zastrow, Chief of Business Development at Dash Core Inc.
  4. Andy Freer, CTO of Dash Core Inc.
  5. Chuck Williams, Head of UX Development at Dash Core Inc.
  6. Robert Wiecko, PM of Dash Core Inc.
  7. Joel Valenzuela, Dash Force
  8. Mark Mason, Dash Force
  9. Amanda B. Johnson
  10. Scott Farnsworth, The Dash Racer

Dash Core is hiring!

  1. Internship at Dash Labs
  2. DashLabs - Trezor Engineer
  3. GPU Accelerator Project
  4. DevOps Engineer @ Dash
  5. Infrastructure Manager @ Dash
  6. Sr. Backend Developer Role @ Dash

2017 Quarterly Summaries from Dash Core

  1. Dash Core Team Q1 2017 Summary Call
  2. Dash Core Team Q2 2017 Summary Call
  3. Dash Core Team Q3 2017 Summary Call
  4. Dash Core Team Q4 2017 Summary Call

2016 Quarterly Summaries from Dash Core

  1. Q1 2016
  2. Q2 2016
  3. Q3 2016
  4. Q4 2016

Notable Core Team proposals:

  1. Dash sponsored Blockchain Research in Arizona State University
  2. Conferences - The Trading Show
  3. Money 20/20 in London
  4. Conferences - BTC & Blockchain International Summit
  5. Dash Conference 2017 (London)
  6. Blockchain & Bitcoin Conference (Stockholm)

Dash Whitepapers

  1. Original Dash Whitepaper
Note: Previously the Evolution Whitepapers were linked in this section. These papers were written back in 2015 and are outdated, because Dash Evolution has seen a massive re-design and has been developed much further than those papers could have predicted. A new version will be posted here and elsewhere as soon as it is available.

Dash Technology Peer-reviewed

  1. Dash PrivateSend Peer Review by Kristov Atlas and Core Team's Response
  2. Dash Governance Peer Review by IOHK and Dash Core Team's Response

Addendum: Misconceptions on Dash cleared up

  1. What has Dash to offer other than features any other coin could just copy?
  2. InstantXploit? Cool Name, No Threat
  3. "Lazy Masternode" attack theory thoroughly debunked (see my comment)
  4. Hardware vs Software scaling - Why SegWit is not the savior of cryptocurrency
  5. How solid is PrivateSend, really? and Broken privacy promises vs Dash
  6. Dash has better wealth distribution than almost all top cryptos
  7. How is Dash NOT a ponzi scheme?
  8. PSA: DASH is not a CryptoNote clone - DashCOIN is
  9. Discussion/clarification on Dash's opensource approach
  10. Evil Masternode tyrants ruling over us?! and Masternodes in Dash = The rich get richer?
  11. Has Dash's development steadily declined over the past few months?
  12. The major advantage of optional privacy
  13. Ridiculous comments on Dash - by Kurt Robinson
  14. The Dash Masternode Network: A Response to Critics - by Eric Sammons
  15. Analysis of the first day in mining Dash by Ryan Taylor, (then) Director of Finance at Dash Core:
  16. How to Prevent the Hostile Takeover of a Blockchain: Eric Sammons on Dash Governance
  17. Official clarification on the "Instamine" issue (Fastmine actually)
  18. Evan Duffield has no more than 256,000 Dash and will give away 80% of that to fund DAOs within DASH. Follow-up: Part of the funds has already been used to found the Dash Labs research arm in Hong Kong. The lab is fully maintained through Duffield's private funding. No Treasury proposal for it exists.
  19. 10 Stupid Things People Say About Dash And How To Respond
  20. Sporks: One of the foundations of Dash's success
  21. There is no so called "Master Private Key" in Dash and there never has been. Sporks (explained above) have no relation to user funds, as the source code easily proves.
  22. Trolls vs. Users: The Limited Importance of Online Communities
  23. Dash PrivateSend and usage of denomination inputs
  24. Valuable link list from Dash Force member Mastermined
  25. "But Dash PrivateSend has a much smaller ambiguity set! Its privacy is broken!!!"
  26. Succinct refutation on Masternodes "artifically" blowing up the price & Evan Duffield being the only miner at launch
  27. Bitcoin Cash vs Dash
  28. "Dash rebranded from Darkcoin to distance itself from its dark history!!" -> Not at all. Nothing about its history is "dark" and more importantly this thread called "The Birth of Darkcoin" is stickied by Evan Duffield himself on the official main forum.
  29. "Evan Duffield lied about the launch time so he would get an unfair advantage at mining!" -> Quotes from the original launch thread on Bitcointalk: "Awesome! We'll be launching soon. Things are looking good." and "Launch is being moved to 11PM EST!". As the genesis block proves launch took place at 03:54:41 AM (UTC) on Jan. 19th, 2014 or 10:54:41 PM (EST), Jan. 18th, 2014. So if anything it was 5 minutes early.
  30. "But Litecoin is superior to Dash!!" - Really? Let's compare - Here's another sober look at the facts on this issue.
  31. Why Dash is not prone to cluster analysis attacks
  32. How "centralized" is Dash, really? & Which project is actually centralized here?
  33. From the day Dash started trading until late April 2014 anyone had the chance to buy Dash for less than 1 USD
  34. Dash Core developer MooCowMoo on alleged Masternode centralization and PrivateSend
  35. Why Masternodes have no incentive to vote in a proposal to pay themselves a large sum of Dash
  36. What is Dash's competitive edge?
  37. Why saying "Dash is a company" is false: Dash Core Inc., a company based in Scottsdale, Arizona is not the decentralized network called Dash. The network, consistent of over 4.5k globally distributed, decentralized Masternodes decided to hire and fund the company Dash Core Inc. to develop said network. This is the distinguishing property of Dash being a DAO, so it's understandable people have difficulty grasping the concept. Similarly Dash does not have a CEO, while Dash Core Inc. -obviously- has.
  38. Dash does not and never had a "dev tax": Dash has a Treasury and its distribution is being voted on each month. Only those funds that have been approved by the Masternode network go to proposal owners. The Treasury is capped at 10% of the accumulated block reward of one month. There is no central authority non-requested or non-approved funds go to and there never has been. Those funds are simply not created. So you can have months in which only 8% of the budget is being paid out, with the remaining 2% going to nobody due to not being mined.
  39. "B-but Evan Duffield can roll back the last 24 hours of the blockchain with the flick of a button!" Complete bullshit. The key in question refers to requiring a Masternode to re-validate its pre-existing blockchain in order to ensure it's on the right chain. Masternodes have nothing do with putting or removing transactions into or from the blockchain, only the miners can do that, thus claiming someone can "roll back the blockchain" in Dash is a malicious lie and a desperate attempt to make Dash look centralized when it's not. In short: No such button exists, ever existed or will ever exist.
  40. Why the total coin supply was changed or "The 84 million coin"-Question

General notes:

The Dash community is well aware that during most of its history this project has been under attack by competitors, many of which are trying to portray Dash (among many other things) as a failure. This is oxymoronic, because nobody hates on failures, especially not for 4 successful years in a row.
If you want a quick history lesson, here's a comment I made on where the Dash hate originated from back in 2014
Another, longer history lesson
Remain skeptical towards sensational accusations without evidence. Our community is helpful, knowledgeable and more than happy to answer any questions, as we have done many times on this subreddit. Still, we're all only human, have limited resources and we're just one project among many (always among the top, though!). Stakeholders and investors of other projects will always have an agenda to smear what they perceive as competition (I have yet to see our community actively go after other projects, though).
Just remember the Bullshit Asymmetry: "The amount of energy required to refute bullshit is at least an order of magnitude larger than to produce it." So it would be very unjust to expect a refutation on the spot all of the time. Prefer taking the initiative by asking the community directly about the claim you're confronted with. This community has proven many times to possess the integrity required to admit to technological shortcomings, but at the same time we'll never hesitate to call out illegitimate claims and accusations, of which there are many, for what they are.
The most common and most empty attack is "Dash is a scam".
More importantly you have to ask the critic just this one question: Who was scammed? The answer usually consists of complete silence or attempts to change the topic. This may sound all very defensive to someone who has never experienced the kind of FUD Dash has faced over the years, but the falsehoods we've refuted above are still being perpetuated by a very lonely but also very loud minority.

Not an ICO project

Regarding Dash's finances: Despite what many people assume influenced by the ICO insanity of the recent past, Dash did not have an ICO and Dash does not depend on 3rd party funding/investors. It is self funded from the blockchain and thus an entirely independent organization that does exactly what it wants, not what any angel investors want us to do. Dash is the first currency in history to achieve that.

Quick incomplete rundown of Dash's features

In fact Dash pioneered almost every single one of its features making it one of the most prolific innovators in the cryptocurrency space. Before Dash invented them, none of these features existed:
To re-iterate a previous point:
Dash has been copied by several dozen other projects either completely or through selected features indicating a strong approval of its technology within the wider cryptocurrency industry. The most copied feature by far is the Masternode system and the financial self-reliance it provides.
submitted by Basilpop to dashpay [link] [comments]

The Nexus FAQ - part 1

Full formatted version: https://docs.google.com/document/d/16KKjVjQH0ypLe00aoTJ_hZyce7RAtjC5XHom104yn6M/
 

Nexus 101:

  1. What is Nexus?
  2. What benefits does Nexus bring to the blockchain space?
  3. How does Nexus secure the network and reach consensus?
  4. What is quantum resistance and how does Nexus implement this?
  5. What is Nexus’ Unified Time protocol?
  6. Why does Nexus need its own satellite network?
 

The Nexus Currency:

  1. How can I get Nexus?
  2. How much does a transaction cost?
  3. How fast does Nexus transfer?
  4. Did Nexus hold an ICO? How is Nexus funded?
  5. Is there a cap on the number of Nexus in existence?
  6. What is the difference between the Oracle wallet and the LLD wallet?
  7. How do I change from Oracle to the LLD wallet?
  8. How do I install the Nexus Wallet?
 

Types of Mining or Minting:

  1. Can I mine Nexus?
  2. How do I mine Nexus?
  3. How do I stake Nexus?
  4. I am staking with my Nexus balance. What are trust weight, block weight and stake weight?
 

Nexus 101:

1. What is Nexus (NXS)?
Nexus is a digital currency, distributed framework, and peer-to-peer network. Nexus further improves upon the blockchain protocol by focusing on the following core technological principles:
Nexus will combine our in-development quantum-resistant 3D blockchain software with cutting edge communication satellites to deliver a free, distributed, financial and data solution. Through our planned satellite and ground-based mesh networks, Nexus will provide uncensored internet access whilst bringing the benefits of distributed database systems to the world.
For a short video introduction to Nexus Earth, please visit this link
 
2. What benefits does Nexus bring to the blockchain space?
As Nexus has been developed, an incredible amount of time has been put into identifying and solving several key limitations:
Nexus is also developing a framework called the Lower Level Library. This LLL will incorporate the following improvements:
For information about more additions to the Lower Level Library, please visit here
 
3. How does Nexus secure the network and reach consensus?
Nexus is unique amongst blockchain technology in that Nexus uses 3 channels to secure the network against attack. Whereas Bitcoin uses only Proof-of-Work to secure the network, Nexus combines a prime number channel, a hashing channel and a Proof-of-Stake channel. Where Bitcoin has a difficulty adjustment interval measured in weeks, Nexus can respond to increased hashrate in the space of 1 block and each channel scales independently of the other two channels. This stabilizes the block times at ~50 seconds and ensures no single channel can monopolize block production. This means that a 51% attack is much more difficult to launch because an attacker would need to control all 3 channels.
Every 60 minutes, the Nexus protocol automatically creates a checkpoint. This prevents blocks from being created or modified dated prior to this checkpoint, thus protecting the chain from malicious attempts to introduce an alternate blockchain.
 
4. What is quantum resistance and how does Nexus implement it?
To understand what quantum resistance is and why it is important, you need to understand how quantum computing works and why it’s a threat to blockchain technology. Classical computing uses an array of transistors. These transistors form the heart of your computer (the CPU). Each transistor is capable of being either on or off, and these states are used to represent the numerical values 1 and 0.
Binary digits’ (bits) number of states depends on the number of transistors available, according to the formula 2n, where n is the number of transistors. Classical computers can only be in one of these states at any one time, so the speed of your computer is limited to how fast it can change states.
Quantum computers utilize quantum bits, “qubits,” which are represented by the quantum state of electrons or photons. These particles are placed into a state called superposition, which allows the qubit to assume a value of 1 or 0 simultaneously.
Superposition permits a quantum computer to process a higher number of data possibilities than a classical computer. Qubits can also become entangled. Entanglement makes a qubit dependant on the state of another, enabling quantum computing to calculate complex problems, extremely quickly.
One such problem is the Discrete Logarithm Problem which elliptic curve cryptography relies on for security. Quantum computers can use Shor’s algorithm to reverse a key in polynomial time (which is really really really fast). This means that public keys become vulnerable to quantum attack, since quantum computers are capable of being billions of times faster at certain calculations. One way to increase quantum resistance is to require more qubits (and more time) by using larger private keys:
Bitcoin Private Key (256 bit) 5Kb8kLf9zgWQnogidDA76MzPL6TsZZY36hWXMssSzNydYXYB9KF
Nexus Private Key (571 bit) 6Wuiv513R18o5cRpwNSCfT7xs9tniHHN5Lb3AMs58vkVxsQdL4atHTF Vt5TNT9himnCMmnbjbCPxgxhSTDE5iAzCZ3LhJFm7L9rCFroYoqz
Bitcoin addresses are created by hashing the public key, so it is not possible to decrypt the public key from the address; however, once you send funds from that address, the public key is published on the blockchain rendering that address vulnerable to attack. This means that your money has higher chances of being stolen.
Nexus eliminates these vulnerabilities through an innovation called signature chains. Signature chains will enable access to an account using a username, password and PIN. When you create a transaction on the network, you claim ownership of your signature chain by revealing the public key of the NextHash (the hash of your public key) and producing a signature from the one time use private key. Your wallet then creates a new private/public keypair, generates a new NextHash, including the corresponding contract. This contract can be a receive address, a debit, a vote, or any other type of rule that is written in the contract code.
This keeps the public key obscured until the next transaction, and by divorcing the address from the public key, it is unnecessary to change addresses in order to change public keys. Changing your password or PIN code becomes a case of proving ownership of your signature chain and broadcasting a new transaction with a new NextHash for your new password and/or PIN. This provides the ability to login to your account via the signature chain, which becomes your personal chain within the 3D chain, enabling the network to prove and disprove trust, and improving ease of use without sacrificing security.
The next challenge with quantum computers is that Grover’s algorithm reduces the security of one-way hash function by a factor of two. Because of this, Nexus incorporates two new hash functions, Skein and Keccak, which were designed in 2008 as part of a contest to create a new SHA3 standard. Keccak narrowly defeated Skein to win the contest, so to maximize their potential Nexus combines these algorithms. Skein and Keccak utilize permutation to rotate and mix the information in the hash.
To maintain a respective 256/512 bit quantum resistance, Nexus uses up to 1024 bits in its proof-of-work, and 512 bits for transactions.
 
5. What is the Unified Time protocol?
All blockchains use time-stamping mechanisms, so it is important that all nodes operate using the same clock. Bitcoin allows for up to 2 hours’ discrepancy between nodes, which provides a window of opportunity for the blockchain to be manipulated by time-related attack vectors. Nexus eliminates this vulnerability by implementing a time synchronization protocol termed Unified Time. Unified Time also enhances transaction processing and will form an integral part of the 3D chain scaling solution.
The Unified Time protocol facilitates a peer-to-peer timing system that keeps all clocks on the network synchronized to within a second. This is seeded by selected nodes with timestamps derived from the UNIX standard; that is, the number of seconds since January 1st, 1970 00:00 UTC. Every minute, the seed nodes report their current time, and a moving average is used to calculate the base time. Any node which sends back a timestamp outside a given tolerance is rejected.
It is important to note that the Nexus network is fully synchronized even if an individual wallet displays something different from the local time.
 
6. Why does Nexus need its own satellite network?
One of the key limitations of a purely electronic monetary system is that it requires a connection to the rest of the network to verify transactions. Existing network infrastructure only services a fraction of the world’s population.
Nexus, in conjunction with Vector Space Systems, is designing communication satellites, or cubesats, to be launched into Low Earth Orbit in 2019. Primarily, the cubesat mesh network will exist to give Nexus worldwide coverage, but Nexus will also utilize its orbital and ground mesh networks to provide free and uncensored internet access to the world.
 

The Nexus Currency (NXS):

1. How can I get Nexus?
There are two ways you can obtain Nexus. You can either buy Nexus from an exchange, or you can run a miner and be rewarded for finding a block. If you wish to mine Nexus, please follow our guide found below.
Currently, Nexus is available on the following exchanges:
Nexus is actively reaching out to other exchanges to continue to be listed on cutting edge new financial technologies..
 
2. How much does a transaction cost?
Under Nexus, the fee structure for making a transaction depends on the size of your transaction. A default fee of 0.01 NXS will cover most transactions, and users have the option to pay higher fees to ensure their transactions are processed quickly.
When the 3D chain is complete and the initial 10-year distribution period finishes, Nexus will absorb these fees through inflation, enabling free transactions.
 
3. How fast does Nexus transfer?
Nexus reaches consensus approximately every ~ 50 seconds. This is an average time, and will in some circumstances be faster or slower. NXS currency which you receive is available for use after just 6 confirmations. A confirmation is proof from a node that the transaction has been included in a block. The number of confirmations in this transaction is the number that states how many blocks it has been since the transaction is included. The more confirmations a transaction has, the more secure its placement in the blockchain is.
 
4. Did Nexus hold an ICO? How is Nexus funded?
The Nexus Embassy, a 501(C)(3) not-for-profit corporation, develops and maintains the Nexus blockchain software. When Nexus began under the name Coinshield, the early blocks were mined using the Developer and Exchange (Ambassador) addresses, which provides funding for the Nexus Embassy.
The Developer Fund fuels ongoing development and is sourced by a 1.5% commission per block mined, which will slowly increase to 2.5% after 10 years. This brings all the benefits of development funding without the associated risks.
The Ambassador (renamed from Exchange) keys are funded by a 20% commission per block reward. These keys are mainly used to pay for marketing, and producing and launching the Nexus satellites.
When Nexus introduces developer and ambassador contracts, they will be approved, denied, or removed by six voting groups namely: currency, developer, ambassador, prime, hash, and trust.
Please Note: The Nexus Embassy reserves the sole right to trade, sell and or use these funds as required; however, Nexus will endeavor to minimize the impact that the use of these funds has upon the NXS market value.
 
5. Is there a cap on the number of NXS in existence?
After an initial 10-year distribution period ending on September 23rd, 2024, there will be a total of 78 million NXS. Over this period, the reward gradient for mining Nexus follows a decaying logarithmic curve instead of the reward halving inherent in Bitcoin. This avoids creating a situation where older mining equipment is suddenly unprofitable, encouraging miners to continue upgrading their equipment over time and at the same time reducing major market shocks on block halving events.
When the distribution period ends, the currency supply will inflate annually by a maximum of 3% via staking and by 1% via the prime and hashing channels. This inflation is completely unlike traditional inflation, which degrades the value of existing coins. Instead, the cost of providing security to the blockchain is paid by inflation, eliminating transaction fees.
Colin Cantrell - Nexus Inflation Explained
 
6. What is the difference between the LLD wallet and the Oracle wallet?
Due to the scales of efficiency needed by blockchain, Nexus has developed a custom-built database called the Lower Level Database. Since the development of the LLD wallet 0.2.3.1, which is a precursor to the Tritium updates, you should begin using the LLD wallet to take advantage of the faster load times and improved efficiency.
The Oracle wallet is a legacy wallet which is no longer maintained or updated. It utilized the Berkeley DB, which is not designed to meet the needs of a blockchain. Eventually, users will need to migrate to the LLD wallet. Fortunately, the wallet.dat is interchangeable between wallets, so there is no risk of losing access to your NXS.
 
7. How do I change from Oracle to the LLD wallet?
Step 1 - Backup your wallet.dat file. You can do this from within the Oracle wallet Menu, Backup Wallet.
Step 2 - Uninstall the Oracle wallet. Close the wallet and navigate to the wallet data directory. On Windows, this is the Nexus folder located at %APPDATA%\Nexus. On macOS, this is the Nexus folder located at ~/Library/Application Support/Nexus. Move all of the contents to a temporary folder as a backup.
Step 3 - Copy your backup of wallet.dat into the Nexus folder located as per Step 2.
Step 4 - Install the Nexus LLD wallet. Please follow the steps as outlined in the next section. Once your wallet is fully synced, your new wallet will have access to all your addresses.
 
8. How do I install the Nexus Wallet?
You can install your Nexus wallet by following these steps:
Step 1 - Download your wallet from www.nexusearth.com. Click the Downloads menu at the top and select the appropriate wallet for your operating system.
Step 2 - Unzip the wallet program to a folder. Before running the wallet program, please consider space limitations and load times. On the Windows OS, the wallet saves all data to the %APPDATA%\Nexus folder, including the blockchain, which is currently ~3GB.
On macOS, data is saved to the ~/Library/Application Support/Nexus folder. You can create a symbolic link, which will allow you to install this information in another location.
Using Windows, follow these steps:
On macOS, follow these steps:
Step 3 (optional) - Before running the wallet, we recommend downloading the blockchain database manually. Nexus Earth maintains a copy of the blockchain data which can save hours from the wallet synchronization process. Please go to www.nexusearth.com and click the Downloads menu.
Step 4 (optional) - Extract the database file. This is commonly found in the .zip or .rar format, so you may need a program like 7zip to extract the contents. Please extract it to the relevant directory, as outlined in step 2.
Step 5 - You can now start your wallet. After it loads, it should be able to complete synchronization in a short time. This may still take a couple of hours. Once it has completed synchronizing, a green check mark icon will appear in the lower right corner of the wallet.
Step 6 - Encrypt your wallet. This can be done within the wallet, under the Settings menu. Encrypting your wallet will lock it, requiring a password in order to send transactions.
Step 7 - Backup your wallet.dat file. This can be done from the File menu inside the wallet. This file contains the keys to the addresses in your wallet. You may wish to keep a secure copy of your password somewhere, too, in case you forget it or someone else (your spouse, for example) ever needs it.
You should back up your wallet.dat file again any time you create – or a Genesis transaction creates (see “staking” below) – a new address.
 

Types of Mining or Minting:

1.Can I mine Nexus?
Yes, there are 2 channels that you can use to mine Nexus, and 1 channel of minting:
Prime Mining Channel
This mining channel looks for a special prime cluster of a set length. This type of calculation is resistant to ASIC mining, allowing for greater decentralization. This is most often performed using the CPU.
Hashing Channel
This channel utilizes the more traditional method of hashing. This process adds a random nonce, hashes the data, and compares the resultant hash against a predetermined format set by the difficulty. This is most often performed using a GPU.
Proof of Stake (nPoS)
Staking is a form of mining NXS. With this process, you can receive NXS rewards from the network for continuously operating your node (wallet). It is recommended that you only stake with a minimum balance of 1000 NXS. It’s not impossible to stake with less, but it becomes harder to maintain trust. Losing trust resets the interest rate back to 0.5% per annum.
 
2. How do I mine Nexus?
As outlined above, there are two types of mining and 1 proof of stake. Each type of mining uses a different component of your computer to find blocks, the CPU or the GPU. Nexus supports CPU and GPU mining on Windows only. There are also third-party macOS builds available.
Please follow the instructions below for the relevant type of miner.
 
Prime Mining:
Almost every CPU is capable of mining blocks on this channel. The most effective method of mining is to join a mining pool and receive a share of the rewards based on the contribution you make. To create your own mining facility, you need the CPU mining software, and a NXS address. This address cannot be on an exchange. You create an address when you install your Nexus wallet. You can find the related steps under How Do I Install the Nexus Wallet?
Please download the relevant miner from http://nexusearth.com/mining.html. Please note that there are two different miner builds available: the prime solo miner and the prime pool miner. This guide will walk you through installing the pool miner only.
Step 1 - Extract the archive file to a folder.
Step 2 - Open the miner.conf file. You can use the default host and port, but these may be changed to a pool of your choice. You will need to change the value of nxs_address to the address found in your wallet. Sieve_threads is the number of CPU threads you want to use to find primes. Ptest_threads is the number of CPU threads you want to test the primes found by the sieve. As a general rule, the number of threads used for the sieve should be 75% of the threads used for testing.
It is also recommended to add the following line to the options found in the .conf file:
"experimental" : "true"
This option enables the miner to use an improved sieve algorithm which will enable your miner to find primes at a faster rate.
Step 3 - Run the nexus_cpuminer.exe file. For a description of the information shown in this application, please read this guide.
 
Hashing:
The GPU is a dedicated processing unit housed on-board your graphics card. The GPU is able to perform certain tasks extremely well, unlike your CPU, which is designed for parallel processing. Nexus supports both AMD and Nvidia GPU mining, and works best on the newer models. Officially, Nexus does not support GPU pool mining, but there are 3rd party miners with this capability.
The latest software for the Nvidia miner can be found here. The latest software for the AMD miner can be found here. The AMD miner is a third party miner. Information and advice about using the AMD miner can be found on our Slack channel. This guide will walk you through the Nvidia miner.
Step 1 - Close your wallet. Navigate to %appdata%\Nexus (~/Library/Application Support/Nexus on macOS) and open the nexus.conf file. Depending on your wallet, you may or may not have this file. If not, please create a new txt file and save it as nexus.conf
You will need to add the following lines before restarting your wallet:
Step 2 - Extract the files into a new folder.
Step 3 - Run the nexus.bat file. This will run the miner and deposit any rewards for mining a block into the account on your wallet.
For more information on either Prime Mining or Hashing, please join our Slack and visit the #mining channel. Additional information can be found here.
 
3. How do I stake Nexus?
Once you have your wallet installed, fully synchronized and encrypted, you can begin staking by:
After you begin staking, you will receive a Genesis transaction as your first staking reward. This establishes a Trust key in your wallet and stakes your wallet balance on that key. From that point, you will periodically receive additional Trust transactions as further staking rewards for as long as your Trust key remains active.
IMPORTANT - After you receive a Genesis transaction, backup your wallet.dat file immediately. You can select the Backup Wallet option from the File menu, or manually copy the file directly. If you do not do this, then your Nexus balance will be staked on the Trust key that you do not have backed up, and you risk loss if you were to suffer a hard drive failure or other similar problem. In the future, signature chains will make this precaution unnecessary.
 
4. I am staking with my Nexus balance. What are interest rate, trust weight, block weight, and stake weight?
These items affect the size and frequency of staking rewards after you receive your initial Genesis transaction. When staking is active, the wallet displays a clock icon in the bottom right corner. If you hover your mouse pointer over the icon, a tooltip-style display will open up, showing their current values.
Please remember to backup your wallet.dat file (see question 3 above) after you receive a Genesis transaction.
Interest Rate - The minting rate at which you will receive staking rewards, displayed as an annual percentage of your NXS balance. It starts at 0.5%, increasing to 3% after 12 months. The rate increase is not linear but slows over time. It takes several weeks to reach 1% and around 3 months to reach 2%.
With this rate, you can calculate the average amount of NXS you can expect to receive each day for staking.
Trust Weight - An indication of how much the network trusts your node. It starts at 5% and increases much more quickly than the minting (interest) rate, reaching 100% after one month. Your level of trust increases your stake weight (below), thus increasing your chances of receiving staking transactions. It becomes easier to maintain trust as this value increases.
Block Weight - Upon receipt of a Genesis transaction, this value will begin increasing slowly, reaching 100% after 24 hours. Every time you receive a staking transaction, the block weight resets. If your block weight reaches 100%, then your Trust key expires and everything resets (0.5% interest rate, 5% trust weight, waiting for a new Genesis transaction).
This 24-hour requirement will be replaced by a gradual decay in the Tritium release. As long as you receive a transaction before it decays completely, you will hold onto your key. This change addresses the potential of losing your trust key after months of staking simply because of one unlucky day receiving trust transactions.
Stake Weight - The higher your stake weight, the greater your chance of receiving a transaction. The exact value is a derived by a formula using your trust weight and block weight, which roughly equals the average of the two. Thus, each time you receive a transaction, your stake weight will reset to approximately half of your current level of trust.
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QuarkChain FAQ

Part 1: Marketing Questions

  1. Q: There are so many blockchains these days and they are quite competitive. What plans does QuarkChain have in place to encourage the community to support this project continuously? A: We will continue to post our development process, ecosystem building and many more on our social media including Twitter, Telegram, Medium, Steemit, and Reddit. Except for previous 100+ volunteers helping us test our testnet, since our testnet 1.0 has been released, there are more than 3000 community members have joined the testing. We also have developer communities which are under development.
  2. Q: Can you introduce your partners? A: We have built strategic partnerships with 30+ global projects such as Tripio, Bodhi, and Laya.one. We also have plans to build deeper relationships with 10 projects including Covalent Chain, DxChain, Drep, Playtable, ValPromise, Ankr, MXC, LendChain, EON, and Celer. Besides, we also partner with Certik in Smart Contract audit. More partnership will be built.
  3. Q: What’s next in the roadmap? A: We will introduce our next plans in three major parts.
1)Development The first thing we need to do is to make sure our testnet is stable and keep optimizing our systems. We have found that there are many places, not only in scalability part but also in virtual machine and storage part, that we can improve in the following several months. We are also preparing articles of our technical details for open source several months later. We want to encourage community members to participate in our project and make our project not only our own project but also the community’s project. Another big thing we are focusing on currently is our mainnet which will be launched in several months. The main feature of the mainnet is that we can increase capacity on-demand as the network grows, and it will work as a scalable smart contract that can do whatever ETH can do but with greater scalability.
2)Marketing Currently, we only separate our market into Chinese, English, Korean, Japanese, Russian parts. We will have more strategies to open for different markets including, Thailand, Vietnam, Singapore, India and Europe. We will do more local stuff and enlarge our local community. Moreover, with the launch of testnet, we will build developer communities. At the beginning of August, we are going to hold the biggest hackathon in the Bay Area with Google ABC. There are only three projects to be selected and we are very honored to be one of them. At that time, there will be many programmers from big companies such as Google, Facebook and Linkedin building dApps on top of us on this two-day hackathon. We also have our 50 million eco-fund to establish an open and collaborative ecosystem of QuarkChain and 30 partners after just one month on Binance.
3)Korean Marketing We recently had the signing ceremony with a very strong insurance company in Korea who has revenue of 20 million per year and decides to go blockchain and global. We also have several contracts ready including a leading AI company and leading financial institution in Korea. You will hear more news about Korean marketing very soon.
  1. Q: Why the current circulating supply seems too low compared to the declared total 10 billion circulating supply? Please note that 40% QKC will be used for MINING and is already locked by Smart Contract. Private sale is locked to protect public sale investors. The first release of private sale is 10% and it will be released in about ONE MONTH after the QKC is listed on exchange. You could see the circulating supply schedule detail here: https://support.binance.com/hc/en-us/articles/360004471832-Binance-To-Open-Trading-For-QuarkChain-QKC-and-Risk-Warning Other token allocation includes 15% for the team, 15% for the foundation, and 5% for advisors. These are all locked up to 2 years with vesting plan using smart contract and will be unlocked gradually.

Part 2: Technical Questions

  1. Q: What kind of language is QuarkChain using for development? A: Currently, QuarkChain is developed in Python. The main reason for choosing Python is its fast deployment so that QuarkChain team could focus more on technology. Actually, we already obtain pretty decent performance results these days, and we could easily achieve much higher performance by employing other high-performance languages such as C++ and Go. Note that early Ethereum development also used Python, but later Go implementation becomes popular after Ethereum got more attention.
  2. Q: What does Collaborative Mining of QKC means? A: QuarkChain will utilize GPU-friendly mining algorithms, which is still under development. QuarkChain Network has several minor blockchains (shards) and one root blockchain. Each minor blockchain offers different incentives and difficulties. Miners could choose any minor blockchain at an optimal price of their hash power. This creates an open market economic model, where a blockchain is a seller with goods being the block reward, while a miner is a buyer with hash power being their currency. It is desirable that a marketing model is designed with features ensuring that though each party in the market pursues their interests, the collective behaviors of each party can benefit all. The goal of collaborative mining is to design incentive mechanisms and difficulty algorithms so that (1) Hash powers are incentivized to distribute evenly among shards. This ensures that all shards are mined evenly, and thus the system throughput (i.e., TPS) increases as the number of shards increases; (2) The root chain has a significantly large portion (over 50%) of hash power over the whole hash power of the network. This prevents double-spend attacks, and a malicious miner needs at least 50% * 50% = 25% power to perform an attack.
  3. Q: What is QuarkChain’s relationship with DAG or other Tangle technology? A: “The tangle is what is known as a directed acyclic graph (DAG): a data structure that moves in one direction without looping back onto itself. ” (from https://www.nasdaq.com/article/what-is-the-tangle-and-is-it-blockchains-next-evolutionary-step-cm911074) The system of QuarkChain Network itself can be treated as a well-structured DAG. This allows QuarkChain to inherit a lot of benefits from both blockchain and general DAG technique. For example, the consensus of QuarkChain and its threat model can be easily derived/analyzed following those of Bitcoin/Ethereum blockchain, while QuarkChain achieves high throughput similar to general DAG. Given two blockchains/DAGs of QuarkChain, we could easily tell which one should be appended thanks to QuarkChain’s root chain.
  4. Q: How does cross-shard communication work in QuarkChain? A: The QuarkChain Network fully supports cross-shard transactions as the first-class citizen, in a sense that: (1) Any user could issue any cross-shard transaction at any time; (2) Cross-shard transactions can be confirmed in minutes; (3) The throughput of cross-shard transactions could be scaled linearly as the number of shards increases. In short, the cross-shard transaction is almost the same as in-shard transaction except that the root chain needs to confirm the block header of the transaction before spending the output of the cross-shard transaction.
  5. Q: It seems there would be different nodes with different roles, all interconnected. How do you plan to prevent them from exploiting the role-playing model? As I understand it, you will manage and audit the network of voluntary nodes, then how do you call it “public blockchain”? Also, sharding doesn’t guarantee the persistence of data, nor completeness of the collection of shards. How do you guarantee longtail operation will be smooth and stable? What if there aren’t enough volunteers to participate? A: (1) For the first two questions, nodes (machines) trust each other to form a cluster acting as a full node. Anyone can run their cluster to participate in the network. Thus, we don’t manage clusters directly; (2) For the third question, there will be data completeness for an individual shard. Sharding and persistence are not mutually exclusive and we don’t understand why you think sharding doesn’t guarantee the persistence of data. All major data stored in Amazon, Facebook and Google use sharding to achieve scalability, and we are pretty sure persistence is guaranteed; (3) For the last question, mining is about incentives. We can try to solve the cold start problem by encouraging mining with relative greater incentives at the beginning.
  6. Q: Is that possible to say a dApp to seamlessly run on multiple shards if one shard cannot provide the necessary throughput? If that possible, as cross-shard transactions are slower, wouldn’t that create somewhat of a bottleneck as well? A: There is a topic of a scalable smart contract. We are working toward this feature, and a lot of interesting things are ongoing. Also, it depends on how the dApp is configured as well. Take CPU as an example, once Intel/AMD reached the clock speed limit, they realized multi-core should be the next design paradigm, which means performance software should also change the paradigm to fully leverage multi-core CPU architecture.
  7. Q: Number of Nodes — Can you explain to me if the more nodes, the better? Is that possible for QuarkChain to reach high TPS with fewer nodes (to prevent slower network)? A: It depends on how these nodes are organized. If all nodes would like to reach the same chain consensus, then the more nodes in the network, the slower the network is. Generally speaking, the more nodes in the network, the more decentralized the network is. Thus, we could achieve the high TPS with fewer nodes, but this will sacrifice decentralization, which is what we want to encourage. This shows the trade-off.
  8. Q: Number of shards — How does the number of shards are selected, how many nodes will be there in the number of shards? As per the white paper, each shard will have its difficulty and reward mechanism. How is it defined? So it means miners can switch over between the different shards depending on mining difficulty and can try to get maximum rewards? How is this mitigated? Is there any sort of EDA or there is a limitation for miners switching between shards? How is this more decentralized than usual PoW solution? A: The number of shards is determined by the network situation and could be done by our governance model. The miner could mine any shards, depending on block reward, difficulty, and network propagation of the major miners of the shard. More decentralized is mainly because a miner could mine a shard directly instead of joining a mining pool. The motivation for joining a mining pool is to collect reward timely as an exchange of transaction fee of pooling. By mining the shard directly (as the difficulty is lower), the miner could save transaction fee and encourage more decentralization.
  9. Q: Clustering — It is a good idea where the “honest nodes” are clustered to run as a supernode and will involve the root chain to confirm the transactions between them. There will be the incentive for the nodes to form clustering. How does this “Honest nodes” are selected for clustering or is it something which the nodes can do themselves? If they can do themselves? What prevents the malicious miners to collude and form a cluster of their own? How is this mitigated? A: A cluster is a replacement of a super-full node, but still serving as a peer in the network. Therefore, as long as there are sufficient peers (clusters) in the network, any blocks from the malicious cluster (peer) will be rejected. At the moment, a smart contract can be only administered in one shard. A cross-shard transaction is to transfer QKC from one shard to another shard, and thus a user with a single private key will be able to execute a smart contract transaction in any shard. A cluster — as a replacement of a super-full node — maintains the full ledger of the network and thus knows all chains. In addition, double spending attack is mitigated by root chain’s hash power via root-chain first consensus algorithm. Please refer our white paper for more details.
  10. Q: Does QuarkChain have any plans to move away from the EVM for dApps with many other VM’s coming out, such as NEO’s VM. Or do you intend to create your own VM? A: We may develop our own VM if needed, but this highly depends on the feedback of our dApps partners. Even though there are so many VMs, a lot of them lack systematic supports (such as editor, compiler, debugger). To our best knowledge, EVM is the most-adopted VM right now, and other candidates could be NEO VM, EOS VM, and ETH WASM. Currently, we don’t have the plan to swap VM but will add more supports for new VMs, i.e., adding new shards to support new VMs or even new consensus algorithms. This shows another advantage of our sharding technique on enabling this flexibility. In this situation, QKC will be the GAS, and other VMs may have different token models. We need to figure out the proper way to incorporate them. However, this should happen after the launch of mainnet.
You can find more about our technical details at https://steemit.com/technology/@quarkchain/response-to-the-article-quarkchain-red-flags-we-know-something-you-don-t-know We will also disclose more technical details on our series of post. You can check the first three of them on our official Medium at https://medium.com/quarkchain-official
Thank you for reading QuarkChain FAQ! The QuarkChain community appreciates your support!
Website https://www.quarkchain.io Telegram https://t.me/quarkchainio Twitter https://twitter.com/Quark_Chain Steemit https://steemit.com/@quarkchain Medium https://medium.com/quarkchain-official Reddit https://www.reddit.com/quarkchainio/ Weibo https://weibo.com/QuarkChain
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QuarkChain Testnet 2.0 Mining.

QuarkChain Testnet 1.0 was built based on standardized blockchain system requirements, which included network, wallet, browser, and virtual machine functionalities. Other than the fact that the token was a test currency, the environment was completely compatible with the main network. By enhancing the communication efficiency and security of the network, Testnet 2.0 further improves the openness of the network. In addition, Testnet 2.0 will allow community members (other than citizens or residents of the United States) to contribute directly to the network, i.e. running a full node and mining, and receive testnet tokens as rewards.
QuarkChain Testnet 2.0 will support multiple mining algorithms, including two typical algorithms: Ethash and Double SHA256, as well as QuarkChain’s unique algorithm called Qkchash – a customized ASIC-resistant, CPU mining algorithm, exclusively developed by QuarkChain. Mining is available both on the root chain and on shards due to QuarkChain’s two-layered blockchain structure. Miners can flexibly choose to mine on the root chain with higher computing power requirements or on shards based on their own computing power levels. Our Goal By allowing community members to participate in mining on Testnet 2.0, our goal is to enhance QuarkChain’s community consensus, encourage community members to participate in testing and building the QuarkChain network, and gain first-hand experience of QuarkChain’s high flexibility and usability. During this time, we hope that the community can develop a better understanding about our mining algorithms, sharding technologies, and governance structures, etc. Furthermore, this will be a more thorough challenge to QuarkChain’s design before the launch of mainnet! Thus, we sincerely invite you to join the Testnet 2.0 mining event and build QuarkChain’s infrastructure together!
Today, we’re pleased to announce that we are officially providing the CPU mining demo to the public (other than citizens and residents of the United States)! Everyone can participate in our mining event, and earn tQKC, which can be exchanged to real rewards by non-U.S. persons after the launch of our mainnet. Also, we expect to upgrade our testnet over time, and expect to allow GPU mining for Ethash, and ASIC mining for Double SHA256 in the future. In addition, in the near future, a mining pool that is compatible with all mining algorithms of QuarkChain is also expected to be supported.
We hope all the community members can join in with us, and work together to complete this milestone! 2 Introduction to Mining Algorithms 2.1 What is mining? Mining is the process of generating the new blocks, in which the records of current transactions are added to the record of past transactions. Miners use software that contribute their mining power to participate in the maintenance of a blockchain. In return, they obtain a certain amount of QKC per block, which is called coinbase reward. Like many other blockchain technologies, QuarkChain adopts the most widely used Proof of Work (PoW) consensus algorithm to secure the network.
A cryptographically-secure PoW is a costly and time-consuming process which is difficult to solve due to computation-intensity or memory intensity but easy for others to verify. For a block to be valid it must satisfy certain requirements and hash to a value less than the current target threshold. Reverting a block requires recreating all successor blocks and redoing the work they contain, which is costly.
By running a cluster, everyone can become a miner and participate in the mining process. The mining rewards are proportional to the number of blocks mined by each individual.
2.2 Introduction to QuarkChain Algorithms and Mining setup According to QuarkChain’s two-layered blockchain structure and Boson consensus, different shards can apply different consensus and mining algorithms. As part of the Boson consensus, each shard can adjust the difficulty dynamically to increase or decrease the hash power of each shard chain.
In order to fully test QuarkChain testnet 2.0, we adopt three different types of mining algorithms” Ethash, Double SHA256, and Qkchash, which is ASIC resistant and exclusively developed by QuarkChain founder Qi Zhou. These first two hash algorithms correspond to the mining algorithms dominantly conducted on the graphics processing unit (GPU) and application-specific integrated circuits (ASIC), respectively.
I. Ethash Ethash is the PoW mining algorithm for Ethereum. It is the latest version of earlier Dagger-Hashimoto. Ethash is memory intensive, which makes it require large amounts of memory space in the process of mining. The efficiency of mining is basically independent of the CPU, but directly related to memory size and bandwidth. Therefore, by design, building Ethash ASIC is relatively difficult. Currently, the Ethash mining is dominantly conducted on the GPU machines. Read more about Ethash: https://github.com/ethereum/wiki/wiki/Ethash
II. Double SHA256 Double SHA256 is the PoW mining algorithms for Bitcoin. It is computational intensive hash algorithm, which uses two SHA256 iterations for the block header. If the hash result is less than the specific target, the mining is successful. ASIC machine has been developed by Bitmain to find more hashes with less electrical power usage. Read more about Double SHA256: https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Block_hashing_algorithm
III. Qkchash Originally, Bitcoin mining was conducted on the CPU of individual computers, with more cores and greater speed resulting in more profitability. After that, the mining process became dominated by GPU machines, then field-programmable gate arrays (FPGA) and finally ASIC, in a race to achieve more hash rates with less electrical power usage. Due to this arms race, it has become increasingly harder for prospective new miners to join. This raises centralization concerns because the manufacturers of the high-performance ASIC are concentrated in a small few.
To solve this, after extensive research and development, QuarkChain founder Dr. Qi Zhou has developed mining algorithm — Qkchash, that is expected to be ASIC-resistant. The idea is motivated by the famous date structure orders-statistic tree. Based on this data structure, Qkchash requires to perform multiple search, insert, and delete operations in the tree, which tries to break the ASIC pipeline and makes the code execution path to be data-dependent and unpredictable besides random memory-access patterns. Thus, the mining efficiency is closely related to the CPU, which ensures the security of Boston consensus and encourges the mining decentralization.
Please refer to Dr. Qi’s paper for more details: https://medium.com/quarkchain-official/order-statistics-based-hash-algorithm-e40f108563c4
2.3 Testnet 2.0 mining configuration Numbers of Shards: 8 Cluster: According to the real-time online mining node The corresponding mining algorithm is Read more about Ethash with Guardian: https://github.com/QuarkChain/pyquarkchain/wiki/Ethash-with-Guardian)
We will provide cluster software and the demo implementation of CPU mining to the public. Miners are able to arbitrarily select one shard or multiple shards to mine according to the mining difficulty and rewards of different shards. GPU / ASIC mining is allowed if the public manages to get it working with the current testnet. With the upgrade of our testnet, we will further provide the corresponding GPU / ASIC software.
QuarkChain’s two-layered blockchain structure, new P2P mode, and Boson consensus algorithm are expected tobe fully tested and verified in the QuarkChain testnet 2.0. 3 Mining Guidance In order to encourage all community members to participate in QuarkChain Testnet 2.0 mining event, we have prepared three mining guidances for community members of different backgrounds.
Today we are releasing the Docker Mining Tutorial first. This tutorial provides a command line configuration guide for developers and a docker image for multiple platforms, including a concise introduction of nodes and mining settings. Follow the instructions here: Quick Start with QuarkChain Mining.
Next we will continue to release: A tutorial for community members who don’t have programming background. In this tutorial, we will teach how to create private QuarkChain nodes using AWS, and how to mine QKC step by step. This tutorial is expected to be released in the next few days. Programs and APIs integrated with GPU / ASIC mining. This is expected to allow existing miners to switch to QKC mining more seamlessly. Frequently Asked Questions: 1. Can I use my laptop or personal computer to mine? Yes, we will provide cluster software and the demo implementation of CPU mining to the public. Miners will be able to arbitrarily select one shard or multiple shards to mine according to the work difficulty and rewards of different shards. 2. What is the minimum requirements for my laptop or personal computer to mine? Please prepare a Linux or MacOs machine with public IP address or port forwarding set up. 3. Can I mine with my GPU or an ASIC machine? For now, we will only be providing the demo implementation of CPU mining as our first step. Interested miners/developers can rewrite the corresponding GPU / ASIC mining program, according to the JSON RPC API we provided. With the upgrade of our testnet, we expect to provide the corresponding GPU / ASIC interface at a later date. 4. What is the difference among the different mining algorithms? Which one should I choose? Double SHA256 is a computational intensive algorithm, but Ethash and Qkchash are memory intensive algorithms, which have certain requirements on the computer’s memory. Since currently we only support CPU mining, the mining efficiency entirely depends on the cores and speed of CPU. 5. For testnet mining, what else should I know? First, the mining process will occupy a computer’s memory. Thus, it is recommended to use an idle computer for mining. In Testnet 2.0 settings, the target block time of root chain is 60 seconds, and the target block time of shard chain is 10 seconds. The mining is a completely random process, which will take some time and consume a certain amount of electricity. 6. What are the risks of testnet mining? Currently our testnet is still under the development stage and may not be 100% stable. Thus, there would be some risks for QuarkChain main chain forks in testnet, software upgrades and system reboots. These may cause your tQKC or block record to be lost despite our best efforts to ensure the stability and security of the testnet.
For more technical questions, welcome to join our developer community on Discard: https://discord.me/quarkchain. 4 Reward Mechanism Testnet 2.0 and all rewards described herein, including mining, are not being offered and will not be available to any citizens or residents of the United States and certain other jurisdictions. All rewards will only be payable following the mainnet launch of QuarkChain. In order to claim or receive any of the following rewards after mainnet launch, you will be required to provide certain identifying documentation and information about yourself. Failure to provide such information or demonstrate compliance with the restrictions herein may result in forfeiture of all rewards, prohibition from participating in future QuarkChain programs, and other sanctions.
NO U.S. PERSONS MAY PARTICIPATE IN TESTNET 2.0 AND QUARKCHAIN WILL STRICTLY ENFORCE THIS VIA OUR KYC PROCEDURES. IF YOU ARE A CITIZEN OR RESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES, DO NOT PARTICIPATE IN TESTNET 2.0. YOU WILL NOT RECEIVE ANY REWARDS FOR YOUR PARTICIPATION.
4.1 Mining Rewards
  1. Prize Pool A total of 5 million QKC prize pool have been reserved to motivate all miners to participate in the testnet 2.0 mining event. According to the different mining algorithms, the prize pool is allocated as follows:
Total Prize Pool: 5,000,000 QKC Prize Pool for Ethash Algorithm: 2,000,000 QKC Prize Pool for Double SHA256 Algorithm: 1,000,000 QKC Prize Pool for Qkchash Algorithm: 2,000,000 QKC
The number of QKC each miner is eligible to receive upon mainnet launch will be calculated on a pro rata basis for each mining algorithm set forth above, based on the ratio of sharded block mined by each miner to the total number of sharded block mined by all miners employing such mining algorithm in Testnet 2.0.
  1. Early-bird Rewards To encourage more people to participate early, we will provide early bird rewards. Miners who participate in the first month (December 2018, PST) will enjoy double points. This additional point reward will be ended on December 31, 2018, 11:59pm (PST).
4.2 Bonus for Bug Submission: If you find any bugs for QuarkChain testnet, please feel free to create an issue on our Github page: https://github.com/QuarkChain/pyquarkchain/issues, or send us an email to [email protected]. We may provide related rewards based on the importance and difficulty of the bugs.
4.3 Reward Rules: QuarkChain reserves the right to review the qualifications of the participants in this event. If any cheating behaviors were to be found, the participant will be immediately disqualified from any rewards. QuarkChain further reserves the right to update the rules of the event, to stop the event/network, or to restart the event/network in its sole discretion, including the right to interpret any rules, terms or conditions. For the latest information, please visit our official website or follow us on Telegram/Twitter. About QuarkChain QuarkChain is a flexible, scalable, and user-oriented blockchain infrastructure by applying blockchain sharding technology. It is one of the first public chains that successfully implemented state sharding technology for blockchain in the world. QuarkChain aims to deliver 100,000+ on-chain TPS. Currently, 14,000+ peak TPS has already been achieved by an early stage testnet. QuarkChain already has over 50 partners in its ecosystem. With flexibility, scalability, and usability, QuarkChain is enabling EVERYONE to enjoy blockchain technology at ANYTIME and ANYWHERE.
Testnet 2.0 and all rewards described herein are not being and will not be offered in the United States or to any U.S. persons (as defined in Regulation S promulgated under the U.S. Securities Act of 1933, as amended) or any citizens or residents of countries subject to sanctions including the Balkans, Belarus, Burma, Cote D’Ivoire, Cuba, Democratic Republic of Congo, Iran, Iraq, Liberia, North Korea, Sudan, Syria, Zimbabwe, Central African Republic, Crimea, Lebanon, Libya, Somalia, South Suda, Venezuela and Yemen. QuarkChain reserves the right to terminate, suspend or prohibit participation of any user in Testnet 2.0 at any time.
In order to claim or receive any rewards, including mining rewards, you will be required to provide certain identifying documentation and information. Failure to provide such information or demonstrate compliance with the restrictions herein may result in termination of your participation, forfeiture of all rewards, prohibition from participating in future QuarkChain programs, and other actions.
This announcement is provided for informational purposes only and does not guarantee anyone a right to participate in or receive any rewards in connection with Testnet 2.0.
Note: The use of Testnet 2.0 is subject to our terms and conditions available at: https://quarkchain.io/testnet-2-0-terms-and-conditions/
more about qurakchain: Website: https://quarkchain.io/cn/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/quarkchainofficial/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/Quark_Chain Telegram: https://t.me/quarkchainio
submitted by Rahadsr to u/Rahadsr [link] [comments]

Guys; We need your CPU Power. Please help me make it fun!

edit: Make an account on worldcommunitygrid.org and join team Pcmasterrace! Then just download the client and the rest is self-explanatory
Hey, I'm one of the many "scientists" working on crazy-large simulations of systems, most of which focus on protein folding but there's all sorts of other neat stuff with it.
A lot of people relate donated cpu power to Bitcoin mining minus the profits. First of all, no, second of all, we don't have the luxury of GPU Acceleration. The support for GPUs is minimal and through my experience only offers a 2x boost; honestly hardly worth the heat.
These simulations take well over a week and a half to complete on the cluster (supercomputer; if you wanna get excited).
My specific team is working on Alzheimer's but I know for a fact the same Software and equations need to be solved for Cancer and HIV projects.
I CAN CONFIRM FIRST-HANDTHIS STUFF MAKES A HUGE FUCKING DIFFERENCE. And there's ways to make it competitive with team leaderboards for donations (ranked worldwide, I'm thinking PCMasterRace could do some damage.)
Is there any chance the community would be willing to start a team on worldcommunitygrid? I was thinking weekly winners could get free steam games from other brothers or something along the lines of that?
edit2: you can set cpu usage to 1% even if you wanted to; preferences is very full-fleshed
edit3: the member count is going up!! you guys are the best! Keep signing up! I can't wait to tell my boss about this.
edit4: WCG is doing an update on the stats so you might not be able to join the team for a few minutes but you can still get yourself going and we can still see that contribution :)
submitted by catscant to pcmasterrace [link] [comments]

Here's what Satoshi wrote to the man responsible for Pizza Day, Laszlo Hanecz -- a r/bitcoin exclusive from "Digital Gold"

In the course of reporting for my book Digital Gold I learned a lot more about the story of Laszlo Hanecz, the man who spent 10,000 Bitcoins for pizza back in 2010.
How did Laszlo have all those Bitcoins? It is not widely known, but in April 2010, Laszlo was essentially the first person to experiment with using the GPU card in his computer to more efficiently mine Bitcoins. Before that, most Bitcoin users had been employing their much less efficient CPU to do the computations. Laszlo’s CPU had been winning, at most, one block of 50 Bitcoins each day, of the approximately 140 blocks that were released daily. Once Laszlo got his GPU card hooked in he began winning one or two blocks an hour, and occasionally more.
When Laszlo first emailed Satoshi and told him about his plans to mine with his GPU, Satoshi had mixed feelings. Here is the email Satoshi wrote to Laszlo.
A big attraction to new users is that anyone with a computer can generate some free coins. When there are 5000 users, that incentive may fade, but for now it's still true. GPUs would prematurely limit the incentive to only those with high end GPU hardware. It's inevitable that GPU compute clusters will eventually hog all the generated coins, but I don't want to hasten that day. If the difficulty gets really high, that increases the value of each coin in a way since the supply becomes more limited. The supply is the same: 50 coins every 10 minutes. But GPUs are much less evenly distributed, so the generated coins only go towards rewarding 20% of the people for joining the network instead of 100%. I don't mean to sound like a socialist, I don't care if wealth is concentrated, but for now, we get more growth by giving that money to 100% of the people than giving it to 20%. Also, the longer we can delay the GPU arms race, the more mature the OpenCL libraries get, and the more people will have OpenCL compatible video cards. If we see from the difficulty factor that someone is using too much GPU, we can certainly pick this OpenCL stuff up again then. Maybe my effort to maintain GPU innocence is running out of time. It's worked out so far.
Thanks to Laszlo for sharing this piece of Bitcoin history.
If you'd like to learn more about Laszlo, Satoshi and the rest of Bitcoin's history, please buy a copy of Digital Gold on Amazon, or on Overstock if you want to pay with Bitcoins.
submitted by nathanielpopper to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

So my college have that IBM cluster, could it be useful to mine?

My college have an IBM cluster for the students to make some tests and I'm thinking about using it to mine. I just have to say it's about my research, but i need to know how to use it to mine, can someone help me out? (I'm new in this bitcoin issue, I've read the FAQ but I need more answers).
submitted by anonpothead to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Has anyone ever used their programming skills to earn them money on the stock market in the free time?

Title pretty much summarizes what I want to ask. I am personally not in a situation where I can actively trade stocks. I was going to buy a desktop computer soon with a powerful GPU and all. So it got me thinking if someone spent like 10k or something and created a computer cluster at home and did any kind of simulations/predictions about market movement or anything like that.
PS: no bitcoin mining stories. From what I've heard that is no longer "profitable"
submitted by AskMeAboutMyElephant to cscareerquestions [link] [comments]

$1500-$2000 USD scientific workstation

Build Help/Ready:

Have you read the sidebar and rules? (Please do)
Yes.
What is your intended use for this build? The more details the better.
Primary: Scientific Workstation
Software includes -
-> computationally expensive MATLAB
- CUDA-enabled GPU computing for MATLAB
-> computationally expensive quantum chemistry/DFT software
- Examples of software - I want to be able to do GPU-assisted simulations as well
- VASP - has GPU support
-> computationally expensive FDTD software
- Lumerical FDTD Solver - commercial software (I have a license) that apparently does not support GPU support; seems the main bottleneck is memory bandwidth and not processing power
gsvit - open source FDTD with GPU support
Secondary: Gaming, Cryptocurrency (Etherium, Bitcoin mining)
I figure the workstation specifications will more than cover the computer's ability to do these, but I wanted to mention these all for completeness sake.
If gaming, what kind of performance are you looking for? (Screen resolution, framerate, game settings)
1080p 60fps on high/ultra is good, but if the performance is possible wouldn't mind getting into 4k down the road. I mainly play Blizzard games and Minecraft right now, but may get into Destiny 2.
What is your budget (ballpark is okay)?
$1500-$2000, but variable.
In what country are you purchasing your parts?
United States
Post a draft of your potential build here (specific parts please). Consider formatting your parts list. Don't ask to be spoonfed a build (read the rules!). PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant
Type Item Price
CPU Intel - Core i7-7700K 4.2GHz Quad-Core Processor $323.11 @ OutletPC
CPU Cooler Corsair - H60 54.0 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler $64.99 @ Amazon
Motherboard Asus - PRIME Z270-A ATX LGA1151 Motherboard $149.89 @ OutletPC
Memory G.Skill - Ripjaws V Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-2400 Memory $124.99 @ NCIX US
Storage Samsung - 850 EVO-Series 250GB 2.5" Solid State Drive $89.99 @ B&H
Storage Western Digital - Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $46.88 @ OutletPC
Video Card Gigabyte - GeForce GTX 1080 8GB AORUS xtreme edition Video Card $569.99 @ Amazon
Case NZXT - S340 (Black) ATX Mid Tower Case $69.99 @ B&H
Power Supply EVGA - SuperNOVA G3 550W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply $70.98 @ Newegg
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total (before mail-in rebates) $1530.81
Mail-in rebates -$20.00
Total $1510.81
Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-08-28 13:43 EDT-0400
Provide any additional details you wish below.
As I mentioned, the primary purpose of this computer will be as a scientific workstation. I don't intend for it to be servecluster quality, but rather a strong desktop computer (duel Windows/Linux boot) that can run some relatively small, computationally expensive simulations and software in a reasonable amount of time, before larger projects/assignments are created for running on a computing cluster.
My main concerns are reducing bottleneck - I want to be able to run both CPU and GPU-intensive software in a balanced way, meaning I'm not skimping on the GPU for a better CPU and vice versa. I realize it could be difficult to compare
Some specific questions I have:
1) According to Intel's site, the max RAM speed supported by the i7-7700k is DDR4-2400. How does one use RAM with a higher speed? Do you need a Xeon processor? Also, I'm looking at 32 GB RAM.
2) For my purpose, should I definitely get a Z270? I read somewhere that it has a better memory controller than the Z170, but not sure about this.
3) How does the 1080 compare to 2x 1070? Or a 1080 Ti? For CUDA and for cryptocurrencies? I don't know too much about these from a computer hardware perspective, but am interested in learning more.
Thank you!
submitted by Concordiaa to buildapc [link] [comments]

SR1 trial: DPR's private key

One of the released evidence exhibits (torrent, 538MB) is GX 296.pdf (mirror), which is a PGP private key, specifically: SilkRoad.asc, "dated modified 11/22/2011 8:21:46 AM".
This is the ASCII-armored private key of the main DPR public key, the one he signed forum posts with and messaged with people. I was surprised to see it screenshotted like that, and I thought it would be hilarious if I could take the private key and announce that I was actually the real DPR by signing it with his key (since I've occasionally been accused of it).
But it's a screenshot and not something one can copy-paste, which makes things difficult since every letter has to be perfect for the key to be valid. So I took an evening to carefully transcribe it; it took multiple passes to figure out each and every transcription error (mostly 1/l, O/0, which look nearly identical in the font*), but I finally did it:
-----BEGIN PGP PRIVATE KEY BLOCK----- Version: GnuPG v1.4.11 (GNU/Linux) lQO+BE2VWMwBCADcoI5qldde46EI80fHSTCS4CuJn1Py4AQjJvpAqFColeAm9xb1 /hb0ZUsG3vwod7uiPJdMlq3+1o3TSv9JlO3DPf7I50owQ9+S1ixXebouTvfpEKSb dq1IWAu+O4PtlmFEb76MOmjOzoeV8We8kCRFq8ThoK979A1DR09KsaDfSjCITdsU mQyVaRN0dCaj33V/QAPQybYAjNDEiNd0e1tV22n1dl6z2oVUgfJiuTVI5C0FhSKP c3odexbKUSVk9tkUWcfnk8+9HF5jGNHnUSjWxMkG1uZUDdWKl4yJqQhBHdYqcz8A hcJ6xADbFeoYEO6z5NEjXV0KmoDRCi4C7gdfABEBAAH+AgMC7Hbd7rIjH9vHfrZp /lhwGpLJknlcg/xD4nhaFtrlAVW5Lqn/oL/JqXKX6buPMGWsqrc+E/7A1ZMMHTl0 bn99MSQi1mTkCVyJP4xTpKouLmLIxvzy2/GOMGS03QX8iSzbE4j0el/c5YlYEQr4 genr8Xq9Iyv73W+1n+yOQvJ9PqaMFdyAZLIdNuEgBzvXSt00a5bLKjbL/KuoTdrA C3D1bc0HDlKnzVLcSAFat+y6A5B4EuI/d1oW2Id1tq3azuUpEb9ctG26sYtw7ipE edNjcwsO9XA+vNTnPy9ms698yf615Bwioih5FYNM3Vsqc1zLpv5XwdYWWRW4WRIW xiqqgv6oGh6+HU9XMV937+1VNDf4k4sNXECjxQ4B0MX/F5eWEsfIlqt4V2HMEDE/ eQ0zQbVRhf2MBJ6n6Vw6DDEUEv+4Dn9CUdYSyJPsK7/0JLO/VnKoPqvwhq+p7hZ4 JMHPWwFoMsT3Nuj15Nk3CrgDGE9C6GSyP88BTnSbgyqe9erFHXTOm80r6OfKpDVB h8/nt7iCFxlPcTLqkUoZf1ZwmlJCSD5fB9/yaAwTc3klFdkiPe0ZFODa/aLOqZrG AoYLsPMt9fntzrnXfwsTthkBxDSFiTxxxlRe1eQeRlALO2Bm5Qfn6jRGhrIraX RksscWcFWptjVlm9CDr2al7otX/RPqFjX3uiJMZfBFoYDmb49xdGaptlMCHaD6Wm XJFb4Wiu1ovERN38AT6IxXFPmPJw6SKrSmVeV5Pmn9+SHtfjAA+st0EMGhzBtW2N uZr0wwO1/EcrzaOP4So7n7IqmG3nKafibY2q5Occn/BHqvTKaik+q4b6a/vVdTtl Erp3hXlGk/6UpBLT5RYbU4p7WLGAj5r8DAyH0kI1+tcCxBKD9WVLSFzYqH9Ea59g 77QkU2lsayBSb2FkIDxzdGFmZkBzaWxrcm9hZG1hcmtldC5vcmc+iQE4BBMBAgAi BQJNlVjMAhsPBgsJCAcDAgYVCAIJCgsEFgIDAQIeAQIXgAAKCRACIkI7Z7f6JV/P B/92DrCPpqfzF6EPu1g6Mxt/39EAosKr4YwmVE5DuY+g6pR2dOtDfvkt3QxQkURB QeyaKOQNuXus4vDQi4kcmzHD3DLmc0A0wQzGOyl0a+LwdqUOtckL4SIPbEzSDP9e sOZOweGkBkSDB13KBkW4fFbDGkEcYHZyUt/jFgxflMLtnxAksR1fH0NbmZnUr1e4 L7p+QylRuXOhGLObOTU0n7KDbuZijgqKDKyV6yEXfLJDrZqzlqmoh+DJisn+53Br glDwt7p3MHR3ejyausNeodK7FJ0sY0uHUHuUOmF2xDGvHVb/jrwS5sb7k8YMuq ptRgsMLFLebgM3jrCg78g23k =D+ez -----END PGP PRIVATE KEY BLOCK----- 
This imports into my GPG without any CRC problems and with correct metadata, so it should be right. But it turns out to be passphrase-protected! Dammit! My first try to decrypt it was to take the server exhibit, write down every password given in it, and try those:
109j7IAier 2n3fh4n3o 2t31fKF5hm 2WBx5obj 34534r3f 384jdridh 3j483r87yfn38 _47JB+p1\j}[email protected](L[nZ)#W- 4B5HMiJYy0N0bbK5 4pVAW9bv 4W8IWDjInLguJD8T 83drj3984 8pz2PGGEmn3h3hGJ 8sa7dhf8a7 938ru39 9MPGCtBK abrault66 abstractapproachfillsthemindwithjoy acharlton66 achrlton66 ameeraissa66 [email protected] [email protected] bTyL5RbC cbrady66 cdigby66 dboone66 dFDrN345DSftX dQsQRighnXczcphJ dsmith66 dwallace66 dwiurhi37n EgXcn1ANYF eK5nJgfDqERQ3K96 fahu6wq4ue fwarren66 gboyle66 gtilly66 hallahaa hR6vpCxaGY HuKKtaoLLa hulluh832 J39hlF4n Je)pae]yuxeif7xi jknCRfR3yq3hbtzp k8JqM7Cijw kborunda66 kclark66 LaQXhcURAGMME3gq lmackrell66 lzielinski66 mgatewood66 nlbosm42093 nsj8jdke oh3bdc8wcn rlvrGdex RPGLdgjjveBtHpEN SD8rcicL sfa76ht7 sofas-qxsch sums-XATq86P the2Fieshaqu tkiW23GL U5f305OX Uha4zFYo v6ay080942 w732ihrw7e w8j374847dhw wefi7y4mwh wjBSGHvfEQdfh9oZ x4TiJfRE XUVYNGBgvu7fb5Hw yMrEATSQ7BsBEouV zFAvzSBUXcC0 zS08HbISvSZcB5Ex 
None of these seemed to work for me. (imposter also tried the Elcom dictionary +0-9, 6-9 characters, alphabet, lowercase.)
So then I turned to a password cracker, specifically John the Ripper (WP), whose bleeding-jumbo edition I compiled with OpenCL (so it could use my wimpy GPU, which for Bitcoin mining could do something like 50mh/s); John doesn't handle GPG natively, but it apparently does ship with a tool gpg2john to convert the passphrase hash to something it can work with, which yields:
Silk Road:$gpg$*1*668*2048*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*3*254*2*2*8*7eb669fe58701a92*6029312*ec76ddeeb2231fdb:::Silk Road ::/home/gwern/sr.asc 
I think one could also try pgpry but I didn't since I got john up and running before I saw it.
Since the server passwords failed, and I saw a variety of characters and capitalizations, I had john do bruteforce:
john --format=gpg-opencl --incremental=ASCII sr-hash 
I ran it for about a week, and finally lost my patience. I was hoping it'd be like one of the short passphrases in the server password list, which would have been bruteforced by now. I wound up ending john at
0g 9:13:13:11 0g/s 74.14p/s 74.14c/s 74.14C/s dsssii..dlshk2 
(john.log, john.rec)
Oh well. It was worth a shot. Not everything pans out.
But maybe someone with a GPU cluster or better at password cracking wants to give it a shot and reveal the passphrase? I can't pretend to be DPR after posting this, but it would still be interesting to go back and decrypt some of the messages to DPR on the SR1 forums. (Why should LE have all the snooping fun?)
* these characters also mean OCR is not very useful for transcribing crypto keys; every character has to be perfect, so since you're going to be going character-by-character anyway... One thought I had was that the right key was only maybe 5-10 edits away from the OCR version or my first hand-draft, so it should be feasible to brute-force all versions within a certain edit distance to see if their CRC is right or brute-force specific transpositions. But I don't transcribe keys nearly often enough to bother writing such a tool.
submitted by gwern to SilkRoad [link] [comments]

General Advice Request - Kubernetes?

Current Equipment:
1 x Old laptop: 750 GB HD 8 GB RAM i-5 Quad-core GeForce GT 630m GPU
1 x Raspberry Pi
~7 x super old computers with floppy disk drives and that sort of stuff (probably useless)
Desired Equipment
Absolutely no idea. I really need to research this. I browser /homelab and I'm like 'what's the thingy with tonnes of ports for if they only need 4 of them', so I'm super new at this area.
Desired Features (To work towards)
Kubernetes Cluster
I'm hoping to run a (custom?) Kubernetes cluster at home - for practice and fun. I work as a software engineer and our stuff is all on a Kubernetes cluster, but I mostly do programming, with only small bits of my own DevOps here and there, so I'm pretty rubbish at Kubernetes at the minute. This project should bring me up to speed.
AI Experiments
I'm super into artificial intelligence / machine learning, and I've dabbled in all sorts of areas (data mining with the Weka API - KNN / J48 (C4.5) | Home grown (variational) autoencoders with Tensorflow and Caffe | Image producing GANs etc.) and I'd like to do more, only with several projects I've had to leave it running for days in a row, or spend money on an AWS instance to get it running there. So ideally I'll use a super basic old laptop / raspberry pi combination to get my homelab started, then branch out and migrate to better hardware once I figure out what to get, and then when I have some good specs behind me I'll be able to run some machine learning projects on it all. Even with limited processing power, training a classifier could be left to do its thing for a week rather than running on my main laptop all night long.
Bitcoin Mining?
I'm not too fussed about this one, but I was thinking - if I'm going to sort out a homelab, and it'll be doing its thing, I probably won't have all of its capacity maxed out at any one time, so would it be worthwhile finding a way of making it do bitcoin mining with 'spare resources'? No idea how easy / feasible this is, just a thought.
Super Awesome Dashboard Stuff
I like a good dashboard.
Current Status
I wiped my old laptop, put Ubunutu server edition on it, got half way through setting it up so I can SSH into it from my main laptop, and then stopped to figure out what a Hypervisor was and whether I need to re-think everything based on that.
My Questions
  1. Does anyone here have experience running Kubernetes on a homelab? If so what challenges / useful resources / any info at all can you share?
  2. Do my projects sound feasible / suitable for a homelab?
  3. Any suggestions or improvements on my ideas so far?
Thanks for reading my wall of text! Here's a picture of my dog.
submitted by attemptedlyrational to homelab [link] [comments]

QuarkChain - Future is here

QuarkChain
QuarkChain aims to build a user-friendly, decentralized and reliable blockchain that can ultimately handle millions of transactions per second.
Scalability has been integrated into the design of QuarkChain from the get-go and with this in mind they’ve set out to build a platform capable of supporting industries ranging from FinTech to gaming and social media.
The Problem There’s a saying in life that goes like this…
When you’re young you have time and energy, but no money.
When you’re an adult, you have money and energy, but no time.
When you’re retired, you have time and money, but no energy.
What a dilemma! Or should we say… trilemma?
Hmm, well is it really not possible to achieve all three? Of course it is!
A similar trilemma presents itself in blockchain however there has been no viable solution uncovered to date and this is exactly what QuarkChain along with many others in this space are attempting to solve.
The blockchain trilemma looks like this:
A permissioned (centralized) blockchain can provide scalability and security however loses all trace of decentralization. Permissioned blockchains are similar to centralized systems in the old world such as banks, Visa, as well as PayPal.
Opting for a permissionless (decentralized) blockchain such as Bitcoin or Ethereum provides security and a dispersed network however scalability is sacrificed, this was evident with the CryptoKitties dApp and excessive transaction fees when the demand on the Bitcoin network was high.
The real challenge therefore is figuring out how a blockchain can ACHIEVE ALL THREE:
Decentralization Scalability Security Whomever is able to solve this trilemma will likely score themselves “a one-way ticket to the moon”!
But before we leap towards thinking about getting onto the moon, let’s take a step back and consider exactly why it is that decentralization, security, and scalability are essential components for a blockchain…
BLOCKCHAIN SECURITY
The two primary components that ensure the security of a blockchain are:
Making sure only valid transactions are made; and That the network is safe and resistant to malicious attacks and users. Ensuring that only valid transactions are made allows users of cryptocurrency to maintain a strong level of trust and confidence in the value of the crypto.
If a user can easily send tokens they don’t own and make new ones out of thin air, this greatly undermines the value of the cryptocurrency.
This would be similar to printing money out of thin air, which has been a regular practice for many reserve banks around the world for several years. The more money is introduced into any economy this will drive inflation up causing the currency being printed to drop in value..
When this is taken to extremes hyperinflation can occur as was the case in Zimbabwe and this can cause all sorts of mayhem, strife, and havoc.
DECENTRALIZATION
As the term implies decentralization is the opposite of centralization and in the case of crypto an extreme level of centralization would be having a sole miner for a blockchain.
Anyone transacting on this blockchain would need to have a great deal of faith and trust that this sole miner won’t do anything dodgy as make up fake transactions.
Even if people trusted this miner, the network would still be at great risk as now anyone interested in taking down the blockchain has a single target to attack. They can launch a denial of service attack on the miner taking the whole network down or look to bribe, blackmail, or manipulate the miner into doing their bidding.
SCALABILITY
As written above, decentralization and security are essential for the ecosystem, they provide a reliable and costly efficient space to continue evolving into future tech. On the other hand, as shown on the next diagram, as security and decentralization grows, an enormous amount of data , requirements for storage and bandwidth needs grow with it, which intrinsically implies a diminution in the system´s scalability.
Solution As illustrated in the diagram below, there are three propositions to solving the problem of scalability:
Multi-blockchains → They may suffer from vulnerability issues, double-spending attacks, reverse transactions or strategic mining attacks. Lightning network→ BTC´s option to this problem seems to be inefficient. User’s transaction targets are random and happen sporadically. Sharding→ Omniledger´s solution to the problem, with the intricate consensus protocol. It may be limited by cross-shards transactions and single shard take overs. But partial solutions do not provide full efficiency especially in a time of exponential evolution. QuarkChain aims to fulfill the ultimate goal of any blockchain: Extending scalability far beyond current tech limits, while maintaining the balance for both security and decentralization.
QuarkChain’s bottom up approach to scalability begins by considering the two primary functions a blockchain serves as a public ledger which is:
Tracking the “state” of a ledger and all of the transactions that are made; and Ensuring only valid transactions are confirmed and recorded onto the ledger. 1. The “State” of a Ledger
If you’re not sure what a ledger is, you can think of it as the thing responsible for keeping track of and recording everything that occurs in your bank account.
Your account has a running list of debits (when money goes out of your account — boo!) and credits (when money goes into your account — woo!) which are recorded whenever money is sent or received into your account.
The “state” of the ledger then is simply a snapshot of what’s in your bank account at any point in time, which is otherwise known as your bank balance! When a friend sends $50 into your account that has $100 in it, the new “state” of your account will then be $150.
An ancient Papyrus ledger
  1. Confirmation of Transactions
If a transaction is made it doesn’t necessarily mean the transaction will go through and this is what confirming a transaction is all about.
Sending $100 to a friend with $50 in your account will see your transaction getting rejected! The transaction won’t be processed and confirmed as it is an invalid transaction due to insufficient funds in your account.
QuarkChain’s 2 Layered Blockchain System QuarkChain separates out these two primary functions with the use of a 2 layered system that allows for greater scalability:
The first layer consists of “elastic sharded” blockchains; and The second layer has a root blockchain.
The first layer with “elastic sharded” blockchains can be broken down as follows:
Elastic: the sharded (minor) blockchains on this layer are elastic because the amount can be increased or decreased as required. Sharded — each sharded minor-blockchain only processes a small subset of all the transactions that occur so they are considered “sharded” as they represent a small fragment of all the transactions occurring throughout the network. (This is what enables QuarkChain’s scalability.) Blockchains — the minor-blockchains keep track of the current state of the ledger by processing and recording relevant data such as user accounts and the transactions made between accounts The Second Layer and the Root Blockchain
The second layer serves the function of confirming the transactions that take place throughout the network. This is done by sending the block headers of the minor blockchains that contain all the transactions to the root blockchain, the root blockchain then confirms these transactions by creating a new block with all of the block headers.
QuarkChain’s 2nd layer system offers a higher amount of transactions per second whilst accounting for bottlenecks that occur from increased throughput such as computing power, data storage, and internet bandwidth.
Structure of QuarkChain’s 2nd Layered Blockchain
Are We Decentralized Yet?
QuarkChain incorporates several features to ensure decentralization of the network:
Collaborative mining driven by game-theoretic incentives to ensure when miners mine for their own selfish benefit that this behavior aligns with what is best for the overall system. Mining difficulty algorithms are designed so that hash power is evenly distributed among sharded minor-blockchains and the root blockchain. Each blockchain offers different rewards and difficulty levels so that weak miners can achieve similar levels of expected returns by mining solo when compared to joining a mining pool. This lessens the need for mining pools and results in less centralization. Main Features — Tech Overview Smart Contracts
QuarkChain supports smart contracts with the use of Ethereum Virtual Machine (EVM), sharded blockchains therefore run their own smart contracts local to their blockchain via EVM.
Sharded blockchains can be thought of as mini-Ethereum’s or clones of Ethereum running simultaneously and parallel to one another with unique individual wallets associated to them.
So for sharded blockchain 1, you will also have wallet 1, and on sharded blockchain 2 there is wallet 2, and so forth… As you can imagine it would be a hassle to keep track of these wallets, especially if there are a hundred or even thousands of these sharded blockchains, which is why QuarkChain offers the following two features:
Simple Account Management Smart Wallet In QuarkChain users are able to use a single “Primary Account” where the majority of the user’s funds will be parked for them to manage all other wallets. When a user wants to send funds to a different sharded blockchain the user simply sends it from their Primary Account.
Primary account sending transactions to wallets located in other sharded blockchains
The Primary Account is combined with a “Smart Wallet” to automatically handle “cross”-shard transactions, these “cross”-shared transactions can be made anytime and are confirmed within minutes.
(A cross-shard transaction is a transaction that is made from one sharded blockchain to another sharded blockchain, e.g. sending funds from Wallet 1 to Wallet 2 would constitute a cross-shard transaction, whereas a transaction made from one wallet to another wallet within the same shard, e.g. Shard 1, is considered an “in-shard” transaction.)
Roadmap
Q1 2018 — White paper and developing verification code 0.1 proof of concept Q2 2018 — Release verification code 0.2 and implement Testnet 0.1 with Wallet 0.1. Testnet 0.1 supports basic transactions including both in-shard and cross-shard transactions Q3 2018 — Release Testnet 0.2 and Wallet 0.2. Testnet 0.2 supports further features such as smart contracts, reshard, etc. Q4 2018 — Release of QuarkChain Core 1.0, Mainnet 1.0, together with Smart Wallet 1.0 Core 1.0 will provide basic functionality and basic optimization (e.g. GPU support) for QuarkChain. Q2 2019 — Release of QuarkChain Core 2.0, Mainnet 2.0, together with Smart Wallet 2.0 Code 2.0 further optimizez Core 1.0 and enables clustering feature for mini-nodes to form a cluster and run as a full node. Token Economics Token Name : QKC Hard Cap : 20 Million USD The QuarkChain token (QKC) will be an ERC-20 token until Mainnet 1.0 launches Q4 2018, the QKC (ERC-20) will then be converted to QuarkChain’s mainnet tokens. Crowdsale intended for end of May or start of June 2 year vesting period for the team with an extended vesting period for QuarkChain’s Foundation QKC will be used to pay for transaction fees and to reward community contributors that help improve QuarkChain’s system A significant amount of QKC will be dedicated to incentivizing developers to build dApps on QuarkChain’s platform
Development Team
Qi Zhou — Founder
Qi Zhou achieved 10M tps as a member of the real time infrastructure team at Facebook Expert in scalability and was a key developer in achieving 10m IOPS with clustering for EMC 5+ years as a software engineer. Short stints with key roles at Facebook (1 year), Dell EMC (2.5 years), Google (9 months) and Ratrix Technologies (10 months). PHD from Georgia institute of Technology
Zhaoguang Wang — Software Engineer
Zhaouang has 6+ years experience as a system backend engineer working on large complex distributed systems Key roles at Facebook (1 year), Instagram (4 months), Google (5 years) PHD and Masters degree in Computer Science and Engineering, University of Michigan
Xiaoli Ma — Research Scientist
Professor at Georgia Institute of Technology (Combined 7 years, 10 months) Previously CTO and Co Founder of Ratrix Technologies (6 years, 5 months)
Yaodong Yang — Research Scientist
Vice Chairman in Education at Xi’an Jiaotong University, Frontier Institute of Science and Technology Co-founder of Demo++ (Tech Incubator) Yaodong has authorized 50+ papers in peer reviewed journals and has over 600 citations in his name.
Wencen Wu — Research Scientist
Wencen has been a Assistant Professor at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (4 years and 6 months). Has a MSC and PHD in Electrical and Computer Engineering Operations Team
Anturine Xiang — Marketing and Community
Anturine has 6+ years experience within finance and technology at Wall Street and Silicon Valley Key Roles as Lead Platform Analytics at Wish, Business Development and Marketing at Beepi, Consumer Marketing and Analytics at LinkedIn Partners and Investors
Arun G. Phadke
Arun is a University Distinguished Professor emeritus in the Department of Electrical Engineering at Virginia Tech Fellow of National Academy of Engineering, USA
Bill Moore
Managing Director of Walden International (Global venture capital firm) Previously Chief Engineer Sun Microsystems who co-led the ZFS team, also Former President of DSSD/EMC (Dell)
Mike Miller
Mike is a PhD Physicist with 100+ publications Founder of Cloundant which was acquired by IBM in 2014
Kevin Hsu
Kevin is a serial investor in blockchain companies
Leo Wang
Leo is a recognised cryptocurrency fund manager who invested in blockchain projects. He is an Angel investor in NEO with over 17 years of field experience in mobile internet in China
Zhiyun Qian
Cybersecurity expert who discovered serious vulnerabilities in Linux, Android and TCP/IP Assistant Professor at University of California Riverside
submitted by xnxkillswitch to QuarkChain [link] [comments]

Using an Old Cluster lab for Bitcoin Mining

Hey all,
I know bitcoin mining has been addressed probably thousands of times but I cannot find the answer to my question. I know it may not be profitable when you have to invest tons of money and time into it but I have a completely free cluster of 30 to 40 computers I could upgrade. I am not sure of the specs but I could upgrade the GPU and other components. Now not only that but the electricity would be basically free as this is run on a campus at a university. I guess my real question is would it be profitable to turn these computers that are currently not in use into even a small bitcoin mining operation? Also how noticeable would it be to an onlooker, the cluster is always running anyways and no one really tends to it. I appreciate any responses and I can provide more detail if needed.
submitted by thecubecuber to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Anybody know how to run Deepstyle on a GPU Cluster from home?

My roommate has an old bitcoin mining rig hanging around our garage. I've installed deepstyle and used it as a partition on my hdd, but I want more power, and since I have some spare GPUs I could throw in, I was thinking, maybe I should set up the gpu rack rig into some kind of computer cluster for running neural network stuff?
I'm an artist/designer, not a programmer. But I've built all my own desktops, and through my work have learned the basics of CLI, and Linux.
Would it be possible to do this?
submitted by MadCervantes to deepdream [link] [comments]

My Bitcoin Mining Project and MRIP

EDIT: Everyone, I totally f'd up on GPU's that I would have by end of June. I just wrote a quick VBS script that shows I'll only have 22 (15+7) by end of June. Not too shabby, but definitely not 48. Just wanted to post an update. Feel free to use the script!
So I've posted here a few times in the past. Now I'll detail what I'm doing a little further and try to help others.
Right now I'm working with 5x 7950's, 3x 7850's, a 6750, and 3x GTX 580's (my gaming rig). My hash rate is about 4,500 MH/s. I started this project using the DRIP (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dividend_reinvestment_plan) principles in mind. I call this MRIP (Mining Reinvestment Plan). The plan is to reinvest all bitcoins mined into more mining hardware. Today I just purchased two more 7950's that are due to arrive tomorrow. Note that these two cards were purchased with bitcoins that were mined. This should bring my hash rate up to about 5660 MH/s, which will let me purchase another card next monday. The plan is every time I have enough to buy another card, I withdraw the bitcoins and convert it into cash. At this rate I'm hoping to have about 48 additional 7950 cards by the end of June or about 33,000 MH/s (33GH/s).
To those I haven't gotten back with about hardware that I'm ordering, I do apologize. I'm using ported 7950's. I STRESS ported cards (ported on top, other on bottom) because they throw the heat out of the chassis. When clustering 12 cases together (4x12=48 cards) it's not ideal to "just leave the side off and hope it's cool it enough". These cases will be slammed up against each other. Going to back to hardware, I still haven't decided on a locked feature set - meaning I don't know what I'm going to buy (mobo, ram, cpu, psu, etc). Ideally I want to keep the core system down to about $70/PCI-e slot, but I have to factor in space (hashing density too).
I say this because hardware pricing is always changing, but I want to lock the specs down eventually because it'll be easy to administer. Having 12 like systems will be easier to deploy than 12 totally different systems (all I have to do is image them). Being a net/sys admin I'll probably administer them with a PXE boot image (which I plan on making that publicly available along with the system specs). Anyways I apologize about that.
I run an IT consulting company on the side and thus I have A CRAP LOAD of old machines with a working PCI-e slot (or two or three). I'll be using these up and then will start building out a system.
Going back to mining, I'm not sure what ASIC's have in store for us. The difficulty could rise so much that by end of June I only have 4 more GPUs instead of 48. My hope is that the difficulty will not go up that high as ASIC's are still very hard to come by and really don't make a good investment case right now (or then). Looking at the difficulty graphs, TH/s seem to be leveling off in the near future - but only time will tell! Let me know if this helps! FYI I have put $0 into this so far, as I've been using old hand-me-down GPU's...
Edit: You all are more than welcome to check out my mining stats!
UltraSPARC_1 = 4x 7950's UltraSPARC_2 = 1x 7950 UltraSPARC_3 = 6750 UltraSPARC_4/5/7 = 7850 UltraSPARC_6 = 3x GTX 580 UltraSPARC_8 = 2x 7950
EDIT 2: A lot of you have mentioned why not buy an ASIC or aren't you afraid the difficulty will skyrocket?! I just don't see that happening soon, and this post makes my case quite nicely. They're even assuming that Butterfly Labs will start shipping in quantity lol
Edit 3: UltraSPARC_8 is online! Two more 7950's, woohoo! I'll post some pictures soon.
Pictures! YAY! For reference please see HERE
My personal accomplishments as of late - Exchange 2010 /w AD deployed recently!
Updates on cards - Because today we saw another pop - I'm planning on buy two (not one) cards by next tuesday. I have about 5 more deprecated systems to use up - thus saving me money - before I plan on locking in a system. Keep ya posted! Thanks for stopping by!
Please note UltraSPARC_6 will be going off line once I get four more cards... This is my gaming rig, and seeing that nVidia "ain't shit" with mining, there's no point in burning up $500 cards...
Edit 4: Just got another 7950 in! Bringing my total hash rate up to a 7,800 MH/s peak! It should settle down though to the high 6,000 range...
Ok, now my mining pool is messing with me. How is this even real?! I mean I'll take the PPS, not complaining or anything!
submitted by UltraSPARC to BitcoinMining [link] [comments]

20GHash/s at 100W. LargeCoin says they're ready with a $30,000 ASIC mining solution in July

Just got this in my inbox:
Hi Rune
LargeCoin is pleased to announce that we are now taking deposits against pre-orders of our first dedicated, ASIC-based mining appliance, the LC 200C Integrated Mining Unit (IMU). Deposits will be held in third party escrow until final product delivery, which is expected in July 2012, and will be refunded if the product cannot be delivered on time. And yes, you can pay with Bitcoins if you prefer. Additional product details, along with terms and conditions, are found toward the end of this message.
If you would like to be contacted about making a pre-order, please use the following Google form to let us know:

PRICING AND DEPOSIT DETAILS
The C200 IMU is priced at USD $30,000. We are selling 25 units initially, with more to come later in 2012. To secure your place in the line, you must make a $4,500 deposit, which will be held in escrow by a third party until product delivery. You and LargeCoin will sign an escrow agreement to this effect before any money is transferred. The deposit will be returned to you if product delivery does not take place by July 31, 2012.

PRODUCT DESCRIPTION
The LargeCoin C200 is the world's first purpose-built Bitcoin mining appliance. Designed to fit within a standard 1U of rack space, the C200 connects to the network using Ethernet, and starts mining as soon as it's plugged in to the wall. Mining is controlled via an online control panel hosted by LargeCoin, which allows you to direct mining shares to the pool of your choice and manage your entire LargeCoin cluster in one convenient place. Each C200 mines at 20GHash/s, consuming a mere 100W. Designed for high density operation, the C200 provides efficient movement of air and is suitable for operating in a fully loaded 42U rack (up to 40 units per rack).
Despite the incredible power efficiency and spatial density of the C200, it's priced competitively with GPU mining. When compared with GPU mining, the C200 consumes 100 times less electricity and 14 times less rack space, meaning there's virtually no operating cost associated with this device.
TERMS AND CONDITIONS
Your deposit guarantees that LargeCoin will ship you a C200 IMU by July 31, 2012, that the specifications of the final product will not deviate materially from the specifications shown here, and that the device will function properly when it is plugged in. When you receive the unit and connect it to the network, you will be granted a temporary mining license enabling the system to mine for a period of 30 days. When we receive the balance of your payment, a permanent mining license will be issued to you. C200 IMUs may be transferred and re-sold -- just let us know before you make the sale so that we can transfer ownership of your license key.
SHIPPING
LargeCoin ships to North American destinations for free. Shipping costs for other destinations will be born by the customer and must be paid in advance. We will notify you when the shipping date approaches and provide a shipping quote for your review and final approval. International customers should be aware that air freight and insurance may cost $2,500 or more.
90-DAY LIMITED WARRANTY
LargeCoin warrants that the C200 will function materially consistent with the specifications for a period of 90 days following device activation, which occurs when you plug the unit in to a network with Internet connectivity for the first time. If the device fails, you may return it to us at LargeCoin's expense for a full refund, or replacement unit. Devices that are dead on arrival will be replaced or refunded.
NO GUARANTEE OF MINING REWARD OR FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE
Due to the random nature of Bitcoin mining, and the large uncertainties in the Bitcoin economy and network, LargeCoin cannot guarantee that the C200 will solve Bitcoin blocks at a particular rate, or that it will generate a financial benefit of any kind. Mining profitability depends on a number of factors, including the selection of a mining pool, which may or may not charge fees that reduce the mining reward; changes in the Bitcoin mining reward calculation including but not limited to scheduled reductions in the mining reward; and fluctuations in difficulty factor. LargeCoin's warranties and guarantees extend only so far as the hashing rate provided by the appliance, and its level of average power consumption.

You are receiving this email because you signed up via the LargeCoin inquiry form at and indicated that you wish to receive low frequency updates from us.
Unsubscribe from this list:
Our mailing address is: LargeCoin Inc. Suite 601C 602 West Hastings Street Vancouver, BC V6B 1P2
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submitted by runeks to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Diving Back into Cypto Currency

Hello reddit, I used to mine Bitcoin and made an ok amount of profit to entertain it. I want to get back in to mining (I was around when CPU/GPU mining was profitable) I know that FPGA mining is on its way out so the only way is big clusters of Asics.What I plan to do is mine an easier currency(lite etc) and convert to bitcoin. I'm a linux user for nearly a decade so that isnt a problem. What type of initial investment would I need to make to get in competitively, electricity bills aren't a factor for me so how many MH/s or GH/s would you recommend?
submitted by warmowed to BitcoinMining [link] [comments]

Computer Cluster

I would like to make a computer cluster. I am not looking to build something as powerful as a super computer but definitely something many times more powerful than a normal desktop computer. I would like to use it for various physics, math and computer related problems.
I learnt that the best way to go about building a useful cluster would be to use GPU's. I was wondering if there was a better way to do it. Bitcoin mining rigs use GPU clusters to mine bitcoins. But bitcoin clusters seem too specific and narrow in their operation. That is, it seems like a bitcoin mining rig can only be used for mining bitcoins. I am not sure, if a bitcoin mining rig can be used for solving general purpose problems..
In any case, my question is..
where do I start? What kind of information do I need to arm myself with before I dive into it, head on? And if you have any useful resources, either on the internet or names of books with information related to building computer clusters, please do let me know.
submitted by desijays to DIY [link] [comments]

Massive bitcoin mining cluster GPU Cluster / Mining Rig Water Cooled! Cooling Ideas Part 2 Legit Bitcoin Mining sites 2020  New Bitcoin Mining site 2020  Bitcoin Mining site  Tech Alibhai Bitcoin online GPU Mining Without Invest Profits Mining Fast Withdrawal New Free Bitcoin Mining sites 2020  New Bitcoin Mining site 2020  Bitcoin Mining site 2020

You can earn cryptic money by mining, without having to deposit money.However, you certainly don't have to be a miner who has his own encryption. You can also buy crypto by using the Fiat currency (USD, EUR, AUR, etc.); you can trade on a stock exchange like Bitstamp using another crypto (for example: Using Ethereum or NEO to purchase Bitcoin); You can even win by playing video games or by Dash mining hardware and Dash mining rig. Like every other cryptocurrency, there is a specific Dash mining hardware and Dash mining rig. They are specifically designed to get the best result in minimum application. The biggest issue with mining today is the fact that CPU and GPU mining is no longer profitable. The forum itself has declared this. An ATI graphics processing unit or a specialized processing device called a mining ASIC chip. The cost will be anywhere from $90 used to $3000 new for each GPU or ASIC chip. The GPU or ASIC will be the workhorse of providing the accounting services and mining work. A house fan to blow cool air across your mining computer. Mining generates Allow deployments of only trusted images and scan your images for vulnerabilities. The allowed images in the cluster can be restricted by using Azure Policy. Crypto mining (or cryptocurrency mining or bitcoin mining) is a way to generate digital currency wealth by leveraging powerful computing power. Bitcoin Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for Bitcoin crypto-currency enthusiasts. It only takes a minute to sign up. Mining Zcash using cluster of GPU's. Ask Question Asked 2 years, 3 months ago. Active 2 years, 2 months ago. Viewed 338 times 1. I have a basic knowledge about an idea of cryptocurriencies.

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Massive bitcoin mining cluster

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