Bitcoin - Milken Institute Review

Centralized power always corrupts. When we decentralize money we decentralize power. That enables people to have more freedom.

This is a rumination on centralized institutions, why they fail and why decentralized money is so important.
Communism (dictatorship):
Pure Capitalism (unchecked by democratic laws):
 
Both pure capitalistic and communistic systems fail as they centralize and that leads to less freedom.
 
Democracy is meant to decentralize power. All people should have an equal voice about who leads, and term limits should keep those leaders accountable to the electorate.
The problem is that money disproportionately impacts elections and makes them unfair. Foreign communistic systems use democracy against itself, influencing elections with money in order to destabilize them. On the local level, regional power disenfranchises voters that they think will not reelect them.
In a democracy, the more you remove money from the election process, the more free those people will be.
The main principle is that no matter what system you have, where you have centralized power, the system fails. Money is at the core of power in our modern society. Attaining money is a game that we're all forced to play. The consequences of this game are the difference between slavery and freedom, growth or stagnation, life or death. This is why decentralized money is so important.
It must be decentralized in development (many developers) and have decentralized security (many miners or fair staking). It must be decentralized in operation (peer to peer, without central hubs) and it must have a decentralized record (immutable blockchain).
Decentralized money won't solve all of our problems. There will still be have and have-nots. There will still be racism and hatreds.
However, it could do a few important things:
It doesn't matter if the above solution is called Bitcoin Cash or any other name. I take no stock in what things are called. If it will do the above, then I will support it with my thoughts and actions.
Power to the people.
submitted by Annapurna317 to btc [link] [comments]

Some thoughts on the blocksize from a longtimer

People need to realize, that at the current (and still raising) popularity of Bitcoin, bigger blocks wouldn't help much if at all.
The thing is, it is very easy to fill blocks. If blocks aren't consistently full, users can effectively set fees to as low as they want and miners will include them anyway. Maybe there's going to be some delay, maybe not. Nice and dandy, but it doesn't work for long. It worked for BTC because the number of users was tiny. And it will work for altcoins, as long as they are tiny. But as soon as a given altcoin gets popular enough to be even remotely significant, it will hit the same wall.
As soon as there is more demand than room on the blockchain, some transactions will be left-over and start piling up: the mempool will keep raising until some people are priced out. Some users will say: "well, that's too much, I'm not going to do that test transaction" or "I'm going to use an altcoin for this". There is a "cut-off cliff of pain". I estimate that this pain-price point to be around $10-$20 and kind-of fixed. Exactly between "too expensive for paying for any coffee" and "super-cheap way to make international wires". Where rich users are fine paying, but smaller users have been cut-off. Bitcoin got there already. That's why it's nearing $20k/BTC. That's what many of you wanted, right?
Tip for people with small amounts stuck: get your wallets ready and maybe, if you're lucky, there will another time when network will calm-down a bit (around new year maybe? or maybe when Coinbase finally start supporting SegWit, etc) and either: consolidate all your small outputs into one bigger TXO (segwit one!), or send to an exchange during that time so at least you can sell it. Just three weeks ago we had a period of 2-5sat/B transaction clearing out.
Anyway, there is no other way. We can't have billions of people on-chain. If we had 8MB blocks, we would still fill them up, until some people wouldn't be able to compete with the fees. Maybe we would buy ourselves a month or two.
Also: I've heard many people complain that using the coins is most important, and better for Bitcoin than holding it. It's absolute rubbish. The value of Bitcoin is set by how many people are willing to HODL it at a given price-point, not how many people are willing to spend it. "Spending" Bitcoin is just a transfer of Bitcoin from person A, to person B - nothing in the system changed except current owner of some coins. It's even worse if B automatically sells for fiat immediately. Holding BTC means that your consider it worth more than a current market price. Bitcoin could totally work and be worth millions per piece, even with transactions at $100, as long as people consider it safe and worth holding. As long as I can spend $100 once a year to increase my BTC-retirement-fund, and then spend $100 once a year, once I retired to cash out to some local currency, I'm all good.
Now, I now it sucks if you're not rich, and you can't toy with it, and keep sending between wallets etc. And you feel like altcoins are better etc. And it's true - ATM many altcoins a cheaper way to send small sums of money around. But saving / investing... let me tell you how it looks from my perspective...
I am a software engineer in Sillicon Valley. I have a well-paying job, I eat $20-worth of sushi for dinner, pay $10 every time I trade stocks, pay $3k each month for rent. I can invest $10k in BTC without thinking too much about it. And I'm not telling you this to make you jealous. The wealth inequality is so vast! That's just reality and I think it gives some perspective. I know as I wasn't born here. And I'm no one special here. I'm a nobody. I can't even afford a decent house here. (hindsight is always 20/20, ha)
And there are thousands of software engineers like this. They receive and trade stocks on a weekly/monthly basis, worry about the overpriced stock market, overpriced housing, pilling up cash that they have no idea what to do with. Do you think they care if Bitcoin transaction costs $10? No, they don't. And how many people who complain about $1 fees will take to invest as much as a person like me can? Hundreds. And as I said - I'm nobody. A CEOs here can drop $1MM on Bitcoin, just because they feel playful a given day, or they got jealous of some other CEO friend told them how awesome they are doing with BTC, during a golf game on Saturday. And they wouldn't worry about 50% correction much if at all. And do you think these people buy value-phones and look for good deals on economy-class cars? Do you think they have time to research which altcoin of the day has low transactions? Come on. They will all think something like: "let's put 0.1% of my cash into this magic internet money and see what happens. I want that Bitcoin thing too.".
So, you're free to have your own opinion, but if you ask me, for time being, the people who can not afford to transmit Bitcoin too often will and should just hold it, transferring it when it's relatively cheaper, and use altcoins for playfull spending etc. Just don't expect too much return on your altcoin holdings. I expect Bitcoin to consistently keep growing the fastest, while altcoins keep multiplying. It is a self-fulfilling prophecy. Or an iPhone vs hundreds of Android spin-offs thing. I use Android, but do I believe someone will dethrone iPhone? Nope.
In a sense... you want to invest in Apple stocks, even if you can't afford to drop $1k on an iPhone yourself. Because of people richer than you that can, and will.
And if it makes it any better, I know that LN will solve it all for us. We just need to wait a couple of months.. a year maybe for it to be more common. And I've been through all the early hacks, crashes, MtGox, great depression, forking drama... years and years of problems. And Bitcoin being too popular is like the smallest problem I've seen so far. The problem that smaller coins would like to have, haha. Being patient and some educated faith is what you are rewarded for.
Edit: I woke up, and I have to work, so I'm just going to address some common themes.
Obviously I created this account as throw-away. Duh.
I already can send quickly money for free. I send my friends money with Google Wallet every day. And in many countries in Europe free wires were a thing for like 10 years now. And for purchasing stuff I am very happy with credit cards. They give me points and stuff. If someone thinks Bitcoin can compete as a "payment processor", then I don't know what to say... Wake up, Bitcoin in itself was never really that great at it. Bitcoin won't be a payment processor for the masses. It will be an alternative monetary and banking system. And on top of it, we will get cheap payments and such.
The reason why I hold Bitcoin is that I have something that can't be taken away from me. Through theft, inflation, confiscation, economic crisis, banking collapse, unjust court order, you name it. Noone can prove I have it, noone can take it away. I can keep 1% of my wealth in this weird thing and sleep better at night. Other reasons are secondary, though sure... speculation on the price is a nice thing.
LN networks are going to work. As a software engineer, I understood how Bitcoin works since I've read the whitepaper and did some research. I've always admired how simple it is. Cryptography part requires expertise, but that's OK. LNs are very elegant and simple too. On a daily basis, I work and improve systems that are way, way more complex than BTC + LN.
submitted by hodlforthelongest to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

AMA - Community Edition

Updated:
11) $5m buyback
12) Release of yp part 3?
13) It is allegedly possible that ICX supply can be doubled in only 4 years thanks to a whopping 20% annual token inflation
14) One of the things that got me excited about crypto was that there was no inflation. I'm a bit disappointed in Icons approach here.
15) Where is the DEX?
16) How far are we from interoperability? Am I correct in saying that interoperability is years from completion?
I'll be answering all questions to the best of my knowledge, this list will update regularly.
1) Clear description how icx will go up by benefiting from the line partnership. -> 2 or 3 practical examples.
Don't forget Unchain is a joint venture, so Unchain is ICON's company as well, their success is directly beneficial to ICON. In a recent interview w Brad, Henry also shed some light regarding this JV and that it is way beyond a simple partnership agreement https://youtu.be/paFYyt1hVWc?t=155
2) Clear description how icx will go up by building private blockchains and connecting them. -> 2 or 3 practical examples.
I answered this to someone on telegram a couple days ago. Here's my example,
"So I asked what's the use for icx with private chains. They have no reason to connect to the public chain and they have no reason to tokenzie their business."
The missing link is interoperability. The private chains need a way to communicate w each other, this is actually how the ICON project was conceived. ICONLOOP(loopchain then) offered blockchain solutions to enterprises and consortiums, but they had no way to interoperate
So I think the argument originated from, if the design paradigm is emergent for private chains to go public, or interoperate through a public chain as a common block
We've heard about those use cases and see actual implementations from U-coin vending machines to hospitals making insurance claims etc
I agree in some cases it doesn't make sense for private chains to go public, if its designing a problem to solve, lets not do that
but i'd say, a random guess, that 90%+ of the private chains have a reason to connect, much like intranet/internet
Let me try another example, we've heard the hospital/insurance too many times
Let's say there's a trade financing supply system of a large manufacturer w thousands of vendors
before their enrollment, you'll probably need to do some identity and reputation check in the public chain (common services like ID validation should readily be available as a public service, like chainID)
that will validate their legitimacy.. then next step is prolly for the vendors who need the trade financing where they need a more complex system like a stable coin to avoid volatility.. and move the money around
instead of rebuilding a coin, they could adopt a coin system within the ICON network
then what happens next.. i guess disputes w goods lost or quality problems.. again, vendors can call for a public arbitration system where there'll be a network of lawyers who specialize in cross-border disputes or arbiters to provide the service
so we need a chain of services that can be called throughout the life cycle, interoperable between private and public chains
there are plenty more use cases, but its not a hard choice to make, its definitely possible to have a common meeting point while maintaining sensitive information within their local blockchain
In the example above, nothing is tokenized, their businesses are on the private blockchain without a native coin, but they use the common services from the public like stable coins or arbitration system
3) Monthly or quartal reports on partnerships, marketing, and the tech.
You mean something like this? https://medium.com/helloiconworld/icon-3q-achievements-8c42ea798a0b
4) Opinion why korean people dont bring icx volume on korean exchanges.
I don't think even president Moon has an answer to this :P But are people really this patriotic when it comes to money? Do Americans invest in American ICOs for being made in USA? I guess some will, but this is not (and shouldn't be) the main driving force of token demand.
5) Clarification what kind of understanding we should have about this 124 teampower - are they employees with 40 hours/week working contracts or just 2 hours, cooperations partners, freelancer, what ever.
I paid a visit to the KR office a couple months back, it was like a giant coding factory running full steam. I can attest to this, they're full time employees working around the clock.
6) Roadmap - stop giving yourself room for delays and interpretations by not offering a roadmap.
My suggestion on this one is to have a % completion roadmap with change logs. I think most people are more interested in progress, less deadlines.
7) Quarterly AMAs.
Sounds good.
8) Why the hell are ICON members still advisors at Sentinel Protocol, a ICO that promoted itself using icon as blockchain and then moving to EOS.
As far as I can tell, the two teams are still in good relationships. Timing was unfortunate, SP always had their first product (uppward) scheduled to launch shortly after their fundraising. Public presale also ended a lot faster than expected (scheduled to run for a week, ended in 3 minutes). During the period ICON was migrating to mainnet V3 and doing token swap. It made sense for them to deploy on a working platform, without compromising their schedule. Their team also said that they haven't ruled out the possibility to migrate back to ICON (although I think its less likely this day).
9) Spend some money on an english translation expert for you social media appearance.
The translations (YouTube subtitles) were a bit sloppy I agree, understandable enough but they should definitely spend more time proof reading, professional presentation is a thing.
10) How much from the received ICO money/ether has been provided directly or indirectly to iconloop.
The raised ETH from ICO are barely spent, you can check on etherscan from the contribution address.
11) $5m buyback
From the key announcement by ICON foundation’s CFO Jay, the repurchase program is a pending legal matter, after consultation with law firms they’ll proceed with the buyback. https://youtu.be/keDitkWssv8?t=160
The team stated two main intentions for conducting this program,
If you read between the lines from the buyback announcement https://medium.com/helloiconworld/key-announcements-from-icon-8ea0f5a18d6f
Repurchases under the foundation’s program will be made in open market or privately negotiated transactions subject to market conditions, applicable legal requirements, and other relevant factors.
What this is saying is that, the buyback has no intention to create short term pumps, otherwise all purchases would’ve been made in the open market under a timed schedule. What this also implies is that, there won’t be a public wallet with an open schedule, to avoid legal obligations (insider trading) or unintended purposes (manipulation).
So what is to be expected? Giving a deadline won't make sense because everything can be timed, so my take is that an announcement will be made after the repurchase has been completed. I don't think anyone can take advantage of this program but will still benefit directly with $5M worth of tokens off the market supply.
12) Release of yp part 3?
This is expectedly a highly anticipated yellow paper, as it will likely outline all the details we need to know about staking. This YP however is not just a simple table with your annual returns, this is also technically far more complex than the previous two YPs.
I provided a very simplified explanation for IISS in this thread: https://twitter.com/2infiniti/status/1020141186797846529
IISS is however a lot more complicated than this, it is a full AI based incentive scoring system to explore the optimal incentive scheme to vitalize the ecosystem. On top of incentives, it is also the base metrics for governance policies (voting). Incentives are designed with token economic studies, to reinforce target behavior, based on operant conditioning principles, eg. dormant accounts, distribution schemes based on activity levels, penalties for malicious nodes etc, and it is very difficult to get right.
If you look into the WP, IISS further explored with things like mitigation of inequalities, weighted average and adjustment, efficiency of IISS, fairness of distribution, prevention of misusage and many other topics explored in depth.
The point is, this YP is very complex, and personally I’d wish the team to take as much time as it needs to get it done right. IISS will ultimately decide the overall health of our ecosystem, its sustainability and well, our passive income.
With that said, I am also with you that I’d love to see the details asap, as I have plans to build a tool similar to the Virtual Step Calculator where people can easily calculate their returns. From the announcement at least, it does look like the team is close to completion and labeled the release "soon", so let's just have a little patience and let them do all the necessary last checks.
Also as a reality check, YPs are researches that need to be formalized, implemented and iterated enough times before an official release. So please don’t expect to start staking right away when YP pt3 sees the light.
13) It is allegedly possible that ICX supply can be doubled in only 4 years thanks to a whopping 20% annual token inflation
Please go to this thread for my explanation: https://twitter.com/2infiniti/status/1060397068852748288
14) One of the things that got me excited about crypto was that there was no inflation. I'm a bit disappointed in Icons approach here.
Most crypto token issuance models can be broken down into these 3 categories
All of the above models can work in their own ways, depending on the behavior its trying to incentivize. Sustainable crypto economies are backed by a recursive loop of value transfer that all participants are incentivized to participate in. The goal is to create an incentive loop that all parties act in their own self-interest, then creating greater value.
Let’s take a look at bitcoin’s incentive loop, a simple model where mining is profitable, more miners create more security and security adds intrinsic value.
Mine bitcoin -> market dynamics decide value -> incentive to mine -> security of network increases -> more incentive to mine ←|
Augur’s case
Trusted prediction platform -> more stakes in events -> more incentive for REP holders to verify truth -> more people verifying, more trusted ←|
In ICON’s case, incentives are centered around i_score, which is a function of activities within the network. The incentive loop would look something like this
I_score rewards and governance control (votes) -> more incentive to participate in activities and governance policies -> increased network security and activity ←|
Similar incentive loop found in SCORE
SCORE staking (virtual steps) -> increased activities -> sustainable SCOREs ←|
Now for continuous issuance models, the goals are no different from other models. They want to issue tokens, just enough that it is optimal for maintaining security and encourage participations, creating a healthy incentive loop.
But can’t these models infinitely issue to a point where my money is worth next to nothing?
Yes, this is in theory possible. For Ethereum, with majority of network miners approving such change (say removing ice age), and a new Ethereum client to accommodate this change, resulting in an issuance similar to a 51% attack. Since issued ETH is also linked to the value of a single token, this will render ETH much less valuable. In practice, this is extremely unlikely to happen, as miners are financially discouraged by doing so, since they have much more to lose, just part of the game theory.
ICON’s issuance is a system implementation which depends on activities happening in the network. There are also preventive measures such as issuance upper bound and representative mitigations. I explained issuance model in full in this thread: https://twitter.com/2infiniti/status/1060397068852748288
15) Where is the DEX?
For this one hear the explanation directly from Min: https://youtu.be/tk2tZpnrI0o?t=1662
16) How far are we from interoperability? Am I correct in saying that interoperability is years from completion?
Not entirely. Interoperability will likely take a few phases to roll out, what we should be anticipating for right now is BTP (Blockchain TransfeTransmission Protocol) specification.
What is exactly is BTP?
From the abstract level, BTP creates a mechanism by which two channels may pass messages to each other. BTP assumes that multiple channels (eg. private blockchains from ICONLOOP) running on the ICON network under their own state and logic, at the same time connecting to the base channel for consensus mechanism. This is the simplest form of interoperability.
Down the road we should expect more and more advanced versions, handling threat models, connection lifecycles, asynchronous requests, and all sorts of optimization and so forth. This is enabling interoperability between blockchains one phase at a time, gradually reaching the end game of hyperconnecting the world.
So how long is this going to take?
I do not know. But the purpose of this reply is to explain that interoperability is not an on-off switch, but will likely take many phases to roll out.
submitted by msg2infiniti to helloicon [link] [comments]

After researching CryptoCurrencies I don't have favorable opinion of the current concept. Where am I wrong? (Long post)

Bitcoin and other currencies addresses some of the problems out current currencies have, but do not solve the bigger problems of inequality, and even create additional problems which current monetary system doesn't have. Right now it is a game money that gets value from the gambling thrill and promises of growth. Majority "play" because it still grows, not because of the coins' original mission. Cryptocurrency market is a stock market. Similar to a company that never made a profit but is worth billions on stock market, and its perceived value can be exchanged for real money in the amount the of the collective thrill other believers are ready to pay real money for.
Humans are inherently lazy, and the cryptocurrencies took off mostly because "mining" promised the free money without any manual labor. Computers did all the work while owner was spending their time better. But "mining difficulty" constantly increases and hours on mining of relatively weak PCs from coin's first days are worth more than days of mining on today's expensive mining farms.
It is based on Supply and Demand. Even though all economy is based on it, it correlates even less to the value of human work. All value is in the hands of early miners and believers, while new people don't have other good incentive to invest except promise it will grow in the future without any additional investment from their side.
People are hording it instead of circulating. Again, it is not invested into advancements of our civilization. It is the game of personal struggle and an emotional play between resisting to spend while fulfilling desire to live the lifestyle based on the newfound wealth - more early miners than the newcomers who are just doing the slave-mining at almost no profit after utility payments, equipment payout, and amortization. It creates new class-system not much different than the current one, were the wealth is the hands of the ones how learned the system, rather than the ones who do actual work.
Processing it consumes electricity as much as a small developed country. Biggest profiteers in actual money are utility providers for electricity and hardware manufacturers, while megatons of CO2 and raw heat are generated contributing to the Greenhouse effect in the age when we try to save the earth from climate change, so we all lose. It is volatile, and even though some cryptocurrencies more grow than fall, its large daily variation again does not correlate to the difficulty or value of daily human labor.
What happens when big companies with actual money behind them, like Apple, Google, Microsoft, Amazon, Alibaba or other make their own currencies that are more convenient to use than current money or all current cryptocurrencies?
It is clear that we need some of the benefits that cryptocurrencies offer that traditional monetary system does not possess, but we also need to get rid of all the flaws from both. Our monetary system is pretty transparent and relatively simple. Anyone can learn quickly how rigged it is for the ones who control it and how money is created from thin-air. How are crypto coins actually created differently than a thin-air dollar, what it represents, how it contributes to advancement of our civilization, or how could someone in the future achieve upward social mobility for their family and children with it, when it is not based on any of our human values or other resources, that is something that is not transparent or apparent. Is it even the beginning of a long term all-encompassing solution, or should we search for something completely different?
submitted by niels1234 to CryptoCurrencies [link] [comments]

[uncensored-r/Bitcoin] Some thoughts on the blocksize from a longtimer

The following post by hodlforthelongest is being replicated because some comments within the post(but not the post itself) have been silently removed.
The original post can be found(in censored form) at this link:
np.reddit.com/ Bitcoin/comments/7ks23h
The original post's content was as follows:
People need to realize, that at the current (and still raising) popularity of Bitcoin, bigger blocks wouldn't help much if at all.
The thing is, it is very easy to fill blocks. If blocks aren't consistently full, users can effectively set fees to as low as they want and miners will include them anyway. Maybe there's going to be some delay, maybe not. Nice and dandy, but it doesn't work for long. It worked for BTC because the number of users was tiny. And it will work for altcoins, as long as they are tiny. But as soon as a given altcoin gets popular enough to be even remotely significant, it will hit the same wall.
As soon as there is more demand than room on the blockchain, some transactions will be left-over and start piling up: the mempool will keep raising until some people are priced out. Some users will say: "well, that's too much, I'm not going to do that test transaction" or "I'm going to use an altcoin for this". There is a "cut-off cliff of pain". I estimate that this pain-price point to be around $10-$20 and kind-of fixed. Exactly between "too expensive for paying for any coffee" and "super-cheap way to make international wires". Where rich users are fine paying, but smaller users have been cut-off. Bitcoin got there already. That's why it's nearing $20k/BTC. That's what many of you wanted, right?
Tip for people with small amounts stuck: get your wallets ready and maybe, if you're lucky, there will another time when network will calm-down a bit (around new year maybe? or maybe when Coinbase finally start supporting SegWit, etc) and either: consolidate all your small outputs into one bigger TXO (segwit one!), or send to an exchange during that time so at least you can sell it. Just three weeks ago we had a period of 2-5sat/B transaction clearing out.
Anyway, there is no other way. We can't have billions of people on-chain. If we had 8MB blocks, we would still fill them up, until some people wouldn't be able to compete with the fees. Maybe we would buy ourselves a month or two.
Also: I've heard many people complain that using the coins is most important, and better for Bitcoin than holding it. It's absolute rubbish. The value of Bitcoin is set by how many people are willing to HODL it at a given price-point, not how many people are willing to spend it. "Spending" Bitcoin is just a transfer of Bitcoin from person A, to person B - nothing in the system changed except current owner of some coins. It's even worse if B automatically sells for fiat immediately. Holding BTC means that your consider it worth more than a current market price. Bitcoin could totally work and be worth millions per piece, even with transactions at $100, as long as people consider it safe and worth holding. As long as I can spend $100 once a year to increase my BTC-retirement-fund, and then spend $100 once a year, once I retired to cash out to some local currency, I'm all good.
Now, I now it sucks if you're not rich, and you can't toy with it, and keep sending between wallets etc. And you feel like altcoins are better etc. And it's true - ATM many altcoins a cheaper way to send small sums of money around. But saving / investing... let me tell you how it looks from my perspective...
I am a software engineer in Sillicon Valley. I have a well-paying job, I eat $20-worth of sushi for dinner, pay $10 every time I trade stocks, pay $3k each month for rent. I can invest $10k in BTC without thinking too much about it. And I'm not telling you this to make you jealous. The wealth inequality is so vast! That's just reality and I think it gives some perspective. I know as I wasn't born here. And I'm no one special here. I'm a nobody. I can't even afford a decent house here. (hindsight is always 20/20, ha)
And there are thousands of software engineers like this. They receive and trade stocks on a weekly/monthly basis, worry about the overpriced stock market, overpriced housing, pilling up cash that they have no idea what to do with. Do you think they care if Bitcoin transaction costs $10? No, they don't. And how many people who complain about $1 fees will take to invest as much as a person like me can? Hundreds. And as I said - I'm nobody. A CEOs here can drop $1MM on Bitcoin, just because they feel playful a given day, or they got jealous of some other CEO friend told them how awesome they are doing with BTC, during a golf game on Saturday. And they wouldn't worry about 50% correction much if at all. And do you think these people buy value-phones and look for good deals on economy-class cars? Do you think they have time to research which altcoin of the day has low transactions? Come on. They will all think something like: "let's put 0.1% of my cash into this magic internet money and see what happens. I want that Bitcoin thing too.".
So, you're free to have your own opinion, but if you ask me, for time being, the people who can not afford to transmit Bitcoin too often will and should just hold it, transferring it when it's relatively cheaper, and use altcoins for playfull spending etc. Just don't expect too much return on your altcoin holdings. I expect Bitcoin to consistently keep growing the fastest, while altcoins keep multiplying. It is a self-fulfilling prophecy. Or an iPhone vs hundreds of Android spin-offs thing. I use Android, but do I believe someone will dethrone iPhone? Nope.
In a sense... you want to invest in Apple stocks, even if you can't afford to drop $1k on an iPhone yourself. Because of people richer than you that can, and will.
And if it makes it any better, I know that LN will solve it all for us. We just need to wait a couple of months.. a year maybe for it to be more common. And I've been through all the early hacks, crashes, MtGox, great depression, forking drama... years and years of problems. And Bitcoin being too popular is like the smallest problem I've seen so far. The problem that smaller coins would like to have, haha. Being patient and some educated faith is what you are rewarded for.
Edit: I woke up, and I have to work, so I'm just going to address some common themes.
Obviously I created this account as throw-away. Duh.
I already can send quickly money for free. I send my friends money with Google Wallet every day. And in many countries in Europe free wires were a thing for like 10 years now. And for purchasing stuff I am very happy with credit cards. They give me points and stuff. If someone thinks Bitcoin can compete as a "payment processor", then I don't know what to say... Wake up, Bitcoin in itself was never really that great at it. Bitcoin won't be a payment processor for the masses. It will be an alternative monetary and banking system. And on top of it, we will get cheap payments and such.
The reason why I hold Bitcoin is that I have something that can't be taken away from me. Through theft, inflation, confiscation, economic crisis, banking collapse, unjust court order, you name it. Noone can prove I have it, noone can take it away. I can keep 1% of my wealth in this weird thing and sleep better at night. Other reasons are secondary, though sure... speculation on the price is a nice thing.
LN networks are going to work. As a software engineer, I understood how Bitcoin works since I've read the whitepaper and did some research. I've always admired how simple it is. Cryptography part requires expertise, but that's OK. LNs are very elegant and simple too. On a daily basis, I work and improve systems that are way, way more complex than BTC + LN.
submitted by censorship_notifier to noncensored_bitcoin [link] [comments]

Subreddit Stats: Economics top posts from 2016-12-11 to 2017-12-10 14:09 PDT

Period: 363.96 days
Submissions Comments
Total 998 124701
Rate (per day) 2.74 341.28
Unique Redditors 447 16507
Combined Score 499738 904919

Top Submitters' Top Submissions

  1. 24425 points, 17 submissions: speckz
    1. At $75,560, housing a prisoner in California now costs more than a year at Harvard (5125 points, 597 comments)
    2. America’s Lost Einsteins - Millions of children from poor families who excel in math and science rarely live up to their potential—and that hurts everyone. (3231 points, 440 comments)
    3. One in five American households have ‘zero or negative’ wealth (2951 points, 619 comments)
    4. Escaping Poverty Requires Almost 20 Years With Nearly Nothing Going Wrong. The MIT economist Peter Temin argues that economic inequality results in two distinct classes. And only one of them has any power. (2717 points, 631 comments)
    5. After decades of pushing bachelor’s degrees, U.S. needs more tradespeople (2386 points, 587 comments)
    6. The world’s most valuable resource is no longer oil, but data (2200 points, 198 comments)
    7. Employees Who Stay In Companies Longer Than Two Years Get Paid 50% Less (1873 points, 260 comments)
    8. Student Loan Debt Is Now As Big as the U.S. Junk Market (1392 points, 380 comments)
    9. The tech sector is leaving the rest of the US economy in its dust (614 points, 235 comments)
    10. The Countries Most (and Least) Likely to be Affected by Automation. Japan is at the top with 55.7% while the US is at 45.8%. (532 points, 138 comments)
  2. 19191 points, 26 submissions: jimrosenz
    1. Warren Buffett wins $1M bet made a decade ago that the S&P 500 stock index would outperform hedge funds (7205 points, 402 comments)
    2. The Gender Pay Gap Is Largely Because of Motherhood (3325 points, 661 comments)
    3. 'Negligible' link between executive pay and firm's performance, says study (1561 points, 165 comments)
    4. We need to challenge the myth that the rich are specially-talented wealth creators (1231 points, 552 comments)
    5. Will MySpace ever lose its monopoly? (2007) (1219 points, 193 comments)
    6. Should the Government Bring Back Trust-Busting? (1093 points, 201 comments)
    7. Economics isn't a bogus science — we just don't use it correctly (625 points, 176 comments)
    8. ‘Exclusionary zoning’ is opportunity hoarding by upper middle class (559 points, 240 comments)
    9. Index Funds Are Great for Investors, Risky for Corporate Governance (358 points, 75 comments)
    10. Milton Friedman's Cherished Theory Is Laid to Rest (324 points, 156 comments)
  3. 15893 points, 26 submissions: ghostofpennwast
    1. Student Debt Is a Major Reason Millennials Aren't Buying Homes (2228 points, 487 comments)
    2. Americans Are Paying $38 to Collect $1 of Student Debt (1598 points, 150 comments)
    3. Report: America’s marijuana industry headed for $24 billion by 2025 (1350 points, 74 comments)
    4. Solar Power Will Kill Coal Faster Than You Think (1336 points, 243 comments)
    5. Saudi Arabia signals end of tax-free living as oil revenues slump (1013 points, 264 comments)
    6. One-third of Americans say they’d have trouble coming up with an emergency $2,000 (979 points, 346 comments)
    7. Trump Seeks $3.6 Trillion in Spending Cuts to Reshape Government (977 points, 652 comments)
    8. Indian American community richest with median household income of $103,821 (846 points, 201 comments)
    9. Foreigners snap up record number of US homes (825 points, 363 comments)
    10. More Americans Are Falling Behind on Student Loans, and Nobody Quite Knows Why (679 points, 526 comments)
  4. 13354 points, 31 submissions: Splenda
    1. Study: The richest families in Florence in 1427 are still the richest families in Florence (5678 points, 501 comments)
    2. Handing Out Tax Breaks to Businesses Is Worse Than Useless: Study exposes the futility of the $45 billion that states spend on economic development incentives. (1410 points, 120 comments)
    3. The Never-Ending Foreclosure: How can the country survive the next economic crash if millions of families still haven't recovered from the last one? (1061 points, 331 comments)
    4. Memo To Steven Mnuchin: Trump's Tax Plan Would Add $7 Trillion To The Debt Over 10 Years (950 points, 317 comments)
    5. Rural America Is Aging and Shrinking (414 points, 364 comments)
    6. This Is What a Real Middle-Class Tax Cut Would Look Like (387 points, 252 comments)
    7. The coming battle between the Trump team and economists over the true cost of climate change (290 points, 102 comments)
    8. Here’s One Scary Way Trump’s Team Could Manipulate Government Data: It has plans to recalculate the social cost of carbon, which has been called “the most important number you’ve never heard of.” (256 points, 29 comments)
    9. Hot and Violent: Researchers have begun to understand the economic and social damage caused by climate change. (238 points, 90 comments)
    10. How Wall Street Once Killed the U.S. Solar Industry… and how it could happen again. (238 points, 53 comments)
  5. 12703 points, 31 submissions: DoremusJessup
    1. U.S. Wage Disparity Took Another Turn for the Worse Last Year: The rich-poor pay gap is getting wider (1307 points, 323 comments)
    2. European Union finance ministers agreed on Tuesday to close loopholes multinational corporations use to skip taxation on dividends, part of a drive to stop them from parking profits where they pay the least tax (1063 points, 131 comments)
    3. Trump Plan to Slash LLC Rate Is Boon for Top Earners: Cutting pass-through rate to 15% could cost $2 trillion; Top 1% would get tax cut of $76,000 - Tax Policy Center (1046 points, 216 comments)
    4. Robots Are Slashing U.S. Wages and Worsening Pay Inequality: Robots have a real impact on jobs and wages, new research shows (1014 points, 391 comments)
    5. US Adds 156K Jobs; Unemployment Rate Ticks up to 4.7 Pct. Hourly pay jumped 2.9 percent from a year earlier, the biggest increase in more than seven years (883 points, 350 comments)
    6. Norway's sovereign wealth fund, the world's largest, on Friday called for a cap on executive pay and fiscal transparency at the companies in which it invests, further buffing its reputation as an ethical investor (846 points, 78 comments)
    7. U.S. payrolls increase more than expected, wages rise (842 points, 142 comments)
    8. America’s Biggest Creditors Dump Treasuries in Warning to Trump (838 points, 309 comments)
    9. Unemployment in the U.S. Is Falling, So Why Isn’t Pay Rising? (571 points, 228 comments)
    10. Citigroup on Thursday became the first-ever bank to get hit with civil "spoofing charges," after U.S. derivatives regulators said one of its units entered U.S. Treasury futures market orders with the intent of canceling them (511 points, 46 comments)
  6. 12274 points, 1 submission: CADBP
    1. Freakonomics: You're twice as likely to go from low to high income in Canada than in the USA (12274 points, 809 comments)
  7. 11930 points, 4 submissions: trot-trot
    1. Trade school, not 4-year college, is a better bet to solve the US income gap, researchers say (11060 points, 1329 comments)
    2. Libor: Bank of England implicated in secret recording (517 points, 9 comments)
    3. 'These Boots are Made for Walking': Why Most Divorce Filers are Women (273 points, 268 comments)
    4. This Is Le Pen's Plan to Break Up the Euro (80 points, 11 comments)
  8. 11267 points, 16 submissions: unimployed
    1. Basically every problem in the US economy is because companies have too much power, new research argues (7086 points, 372 comments)
    2. The Fraternity Paradox: Lower GPA, Higher Incomes (1440 points, 319 comments)
    3. The Real Reason the U.S. Has Employer-Sponsored Health Insurance (566 points, 95 comments)
    4. US opioid crisis holds back jobs market recovery, says study (563 points, 74 comments)
    5. An important shift in the job market makes the mystery of weak wage growth less puzzling (345 points, 62 comments)
    6. The Economics and Politics Of Flooding and Insurance (266 points, 56 comments)
    7. Economic models are broken, and economists have wildly different ideas about how to fix them (198 points, 130 comments)
    8. Most Americans live paycheck to paycheck (128 points, 56 comments)
    9. Trump preparing withdrawal from South Korea trade deal (97 points, 46 comments)
    10. The Incredible Shrinking Corporate Tax Bill (93 points, 24 comments)
  9. 9635 points, 17 submissions: lingben
    1. I’m a Depression historian. The GOP tax bill is straight out of 1929 (2907 points, 577 comments)
    2. 35 of 37 economists said Trump was wrong. The other two misread the question. (2127 points, 198 comments)
    3. CEOs agree: Corporate tax cuts won't trickle down (738 points, 301 comments)
    4. Trump's Numbers Guy Isn't Great With Numbers (662 points, 111 comments)
    5. Trumponomics Gets The Thumbs Down From Nobel-Winning Economists (563 points, 268 comments)
    6. If Everyone Is So Confident, Why Aren’t They Borrowing? (466 points, 179 comments)
    7. Economists Have No Use for Republican Tax Cuts (447 points, 180 comments)
    8. Corruption Is Still a Problem Ten Months After India's Cash Ban (412 points, 39 comments)
    9. Should the rich be taxed more? (352 points, 554 comments)
    10. Trump Administration Considers Change in Calculating U.S. Trade Deficit (208 points, 19 comments)
  10. 9371 points, 1 submission: RegressToTheMean
    1. Poll: Economists Unanimous That Debt Would Balloon Under GOP Tax Plan (9371 points, 848 comments)
  11. 8887 points, 39 submissions: mberre
    1. Japan logs longest phase of growth in 16 years (846 points, 76 comments)
    2. British Employers Begin To See A Pre-Brexit Exit Of Foreign Workers (746 points, 268 comments)
    3. US unemployment falls to 10-year low (602 points, 228 comments)
    4. U.S. new home sales fall to seven-month low (546 points, 242 comments)
    5. US deficit rises to 2008 levels (538 points, 91 comments)
    6. Iceland to end capital controls from 2008 financial crisis - BBC News (463 points, 48 comments)
    7. Swiss say goodbye to banking secrecy (450 points, 122 comments)
    8. Pew Research: In a Recovering Market, Homeownership Rates Are Down Sharply for Blacks, Young Adults (439 points, 183 comments)
    9. UK wealth gap 'widening over past decade' says report - BBC News (429 points, 182 comments)
    10. Fed's Williams calls for global rethink of monetary policy (387 points, 158 comments)
  12. 7956 points, 6 submissions: johnmountain
    1. Martin Schulz to Trump: Dropping Paris agreement means no trade talks -- ‘Whoever wants to have access to our market needs to respect the European standards,’ Schulz says. (6708 points, 1020 comments)
    2. Paul Krugman in 1998: Internet’s Economic Impact No Greater Than Fax Machine (710 points, 261 comments)
    3. Without Power to Run A.T.M.s, Puerto Rico Is Cash Only (210 points, 15 comments)
    4. A basic income could boost the US economy by $2.5 trillion (150 points, 165 comments)
    5. America's housing inventory crisis is causing home prices to rise at double the rate of a 'normal' market (91 points, 15 comments)
    6. Why Do Cities Become Unaffordable? (87 points, 117 comments)
  13. 6952 points, 2 submissions: mjanes
    1. The U.S. Has Forgotten How to Do Infrastructure: The nation once built things fast and cheaply. Now experts are puzzled why costs are higher and projects take longer than in other countries. (5056 points, 575 comments)
    2. Reaganomics killed America’s middle class (1896 points, 468 comments)
  14. 6290 points, 2 submissions: Nolagamer
    1. 37 of 38 economists said the GOP tax plans would grow the debt. The 38th misread the question. (5268 points, 473 comments)
    2. Opioid crisis: Nearly half of working-age American men who are out of the labor force are using painkillers daily (1022 points, 137 comments)
  15. 5852 points, 7 submissions: PinkSlimeIsPeople
    1. Tax Cuts Don't Lead to Economic Growth, a New 65-Year Study Finds (3816 points, 352 comments)
    2. You're not imagining it: the rich really are hoarding economic growth (841 points, 546 comments)
    3. Vast Majority of Americans Would Likely Lose From Senate GOP’s $1.5 Trillion in Tax Cuts, Once They’re Paid For (347 points, 128 comments)
    4. Commentary: Signs Suggest Trump Budget Will Feature Unprecedented Cuts Plus Large Tax Cuts Favoring Wealthy (323 points, 212 comments)
    5. Eight Market-Oriented Proposals That Reduce Income Inequality (304 points, 280 comments)
    6. Republicans’ tax plan gives the top 1 percent of households a $207,000 tax cut; Bottom 20 percent get $50 (163 points, 154 comments)
    7. Eliminating Two ACA Medicare Taxes Means Huge Tax Cuts for High Earners and the Wealthy (58 points, 67 comments)
  16. 5489 points, 10 submissions: pipsdontsqueak
    1. Americans want U.S. goods, but not willing to pay more: Reuters/Ipsos poll (1219 points, 461 comments)
    2. After a Tax Crackdown, Apple Found a New Shelter for Its Profits (1216 points, 221 comments)
    3. Fed raises rates for third time since the recession (716 points, 170 comments)
    4. U.S. moves to impose tariffs of as much as 219 percent on Canadian jet maker, siding with Boeing (672 points, 120 comments)
    5. Bitcoin hits all-time high after CME Group says to launch futures (637 points, 365 comments)
    6. Trump Is Expected to Name Jerome Powell as Next Fed Chairman (451 points, 58 comments)
    7. Awaiting Trump's coal comeback, miners reject retraining (202 points, 118 comments)
    8. Republicans to propose keeping top tax rate for very wealthy, nodding to concerns (202 points, 63 comments)
    9. Experian fined $3M over 'inaccurate' credit scores (97 points, 3 comments)
    10. Paradise Papers: Apple's secret tax bolthole revealed (77 points, 8 comments)
  17. 5133 points, 2 submissions: MaxGhenis
    1. Something missing from Trump's Cabinet: Economists (4128 points, 575 comments)
    2. San Francisco Bans Salary History Questions (1005 points, 243 comments)
  18. 4744 points, 16 submissions: InvisibleTextArea
    1. New Zealand bans foreign home buyers (1744 points, 533 comments)
    2. EU Audit Admits Greek Bailouts Didn't Go as Planned (811 points, 291 comments)
    3. Renters in the UK spend average of 62 per cent of income on rent (627 points, 104 comments)
    4. Venezuela pulls most common banknote from circulation to 'beat mafia' (369 points, 80 comments)
    5. Yet again, today’s politicians are ignoring basic economics (166 points, 111 comments)
    6. The next crash risk is hiding in plain sight (159 points, 36 comments)
    7. After Universal Basic Income, The Flood (143 points, 118 comments)
    8. Slow economic growth is not the new normal, it's the old norm (124 points, 117 comments)
    9. Cryptoeconomics 101 (88 points, 9 comments)
    10. Of productivity in France and in Germany (85 points, 19 comments)
  19. 4258 points, 16 submissions: kludgeocracy
    1. How Corporations and the Wealthy Avoid Taxes (and How to Stop Them) (787 points, 296 comments)
    2. How “Shareholder Value” is Killing Innovation (637 points, 217 comments)
    3. Capitalism Can Thrive Without Cooking the Planet (547 points, 296 comments)
    4. American builders’ productivity has plunged by half since the late 1960s (519 points, 112 comments)
    5. There's a $136,400 reason so many Americans feel they haven't made economic progress (470 points, 186 comments)
    6. What Happened When 18 States Raised Their Minimum Wage? (242 points, 189 comments)
    7. Democrats just united on a $15-an-hour minimum wage (208 points, 252 comments)
    8. Avoiding Payday Loans Makes the Poor Richer (201 points, 44 comments)
    9. Maybe We’ve Been Thinking About the Productivity Slump All Wrong (167 points, 92 comments)
    10. Researchers have answered a big question about the decline of the middle class (95 points, 50 comments)

Top Commenters

  1. tcoop6231 (6607 points, 678 comments)
  2. SmokingPuffin (5048 points, 544 comments)
  3. MasterBerter (4931 points, 369 comments)
  4. louieanderson (4560 points, 710 comments)
  5. autotldr (3551 points, 333 comments)
  6. TitaniumDragon (3202 points, 693 comments)
  7. Adam_df (3193 points, 611 comments)
  8. HTownian25 (3165 points, 392 comments)
  9. slash196 (3002 points, 284 comments)
  10. thewimsey (2932 points, 534 comments)
  11. MELBOT87 (2835 points, 187 comments)
  12. HeFlipYa (2819 points, 380 comments)
  13. Ponderay (2809 points, 198 comments)
  14. Mylon (2732 points, 510 comments)
  15. ucstruct (2729 points, 241 comments)
  16. bartink (2473 points, 645 comments)
  17. throwittomebro (2360 points, 490 comments)
  18. holy_rollers (2318 points, 211 comments)
  19. Lando_Calrissian (2314 points, 14 comments)
  20. bokabo (2250 points, 487 comments)
  21. skatastic57 (2212 points, 284 comments)
  22. bobmarles3 (2179 points, 189 comments)
  23. Splenda (2159 points, 366 comments)
  24. mwatwe01 (2133 points, 34 comments)
  25. UpsideVII (2120 points, 171 comments)
  26. sunflowerfly (2032 points, 178 comments)
  27. OliverSparrow (2002 points, 362 comments)
  28. Rookwood (1965 points, 297 comments)
  29. besttrousers (1948 points, 181 comments)
  30. sethstorm (1928 points, 880 comments)
  31. roboczar (1899 points, 133 comments)
  32. HumanKapital_ (1889 points, 404 comments)
  33. itsreaditpeople (1887 points, 13 comments)
  34. cd411 (1880 points, 62 comments)
  35. brberg (1841 points, 287 comments)
  36. Brad_Wesley (1811 points, 183 comments)
  37. DrSandbags (1772 points, 164 comments)
  38. DefendedCobra29 (1727 points, 27 comments)
  39. Uptons_BJs (1660 points, 70 comments)
  40. TracyMorganFreeman (1655 points, 628 comments)
  41. whyrat (1652 points, 110 comments)
  42. FweeSpeech (1648 points, 68 comments)
  43. darwin2500 (1635 points, 229 comments)
  44. Holophonist (1612 points, 247 comments)
  45. Nolagamer (1569 points, 272 comments)
  46. Dave1mo1 (1553 points, 171 comments)
  47. WordSalad11 (1546 points, 167 comments)
  48. HeTalksToComputers (1511 points, 141 comments)
  49. number676766 (1475 points, 7 comments)
  50. matty_a (1445 points, 1 comment)

Top Submissions

  1. Freakonomics: You're twice as likely to go from low to high income in Canada than in the USA by CADBP (12274 points, 809 comments)
  2. Trade school, not 4-year college, is a better bet to solve the US income gap, researchers say by trot-trot (11060 points, 1329 comments)
  3. Poll: Economists Unanimous That Debt Would Balloon Under GOP Tax Plan by RegressToTheMean (9371 points, 848 comments)
  4. Warren Buffett wins $1M bet made a decade ago that the S&P 500 stock index would outperform hedge funds by jimrosenz (7205 points, 402 comments)
  5. Basically every problem in the US economy is because companies have too much power, new research argues by unimployed (7086 points, 372 comments)
  6. Martin Schulz to Trump: Dropping Paris agreement means no trade talks -- ‘Whoever wants to have access to our market needs to respect the European standards,’ Schulz says. by johnmountain (6708 points, 1020 comments)
  7. Study: The richest families in Florence in 1427 are still the richest families in Florence by Splenda (5678 points, 501 comments)
  8. Warren Buffett declared victory Saturday in his decade-long, $1 million bet that low-cost index funds would out earn more expensive hedge funds by deleted (5318 points, 311 comments)
  9. 37 of 38 economists said the GOP tax plans would grow the debt. The 38th misread the question. by Nolagamer (5268 points, 473 comments)
  10. At $75,560, housing a prisoner in California now costs more than a year at Harvard by speckz (5125 points, 597 comments)

Top Comments

  1. 1760 points: itsreaditpeople's comment in Freakonomics: You're twice as likely to go from low to high income in Canada than in the USA
  2. 1678 points: mwatwe01's comment in Trade school, not 4-year college, is a better bet to solve the US income gap, researchers say
  3. 1445 points: matty_a's comment in Trump Administration Rolls Back Protections for People in Default on Student Loans
  4. 1411 points: electrik_wizard's comment in The U.S. Has Forgotten How to Do Infrastructure: The nation once built things fast and cheaply. Now experts are puzzled why costs are higher and projects take longer than in other countries.
  5. 1326 points: number676766's comment in Something missing from Trump's Cabinet: Economists
  6. 1314 points: Lando_Calrissian's comment in Trump names Japan a currency manipulator
  7. 1201 points: DefendedCobra29's comment in Poll: Economists Unanimous That Debt Would Balloon Under GOP Tax Plan
  8. 1004 points: kristopolous's comment in Reaganomics killed America’s middle class
  9. 1000 points: TheWhitestOrca's comment in Poll: Economists Unanimous That Debt Would Balloon Under GOP Tax Plan
  10. 983 points: BmoreIntelligent's comment in The Fraternity Paradox: Lower GPA, Higher Incomes
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submitted by subreddit_stats to subreddit_stats [link] [comments]

4/18/13 Bricks of gold, bits of code: the worship of things shiny and useless from FT Alphaville

by Izabella Kaminska
If the meteoric rise and fall of the cyber crypto currency Bitcoin this month teaches us anything, it’s to what degree a market can be influenced by speculative flows pumped up by internet hysteria and viral marketing. There is no intrinsic value to a Bitcoin. The asset class, in many ways, behaves just like gold. Bitcoins can never be consumed. They can never be destroyed. They can only ever be hoarded or transacted. If there is value to a Bitcoin (or gold) it is tied to its cost of production, that being the energy it costs to produce it, its restricted supply — a function of a computer protocol — and the cult-like beliefs of its dedicated followers. In many ways the movement is akin to a religion, one spawned from the foundation myth of the pseudonymous Satoshi Nakamoto, the mysterious architect of the high-level programming that backs the system. Its followers are attracted by the promise of a new age of decentralised currency markets, in which Bitcoin reigns supreme under no authority but its own, free of government interference. This anarchic philosophy is propagated on a daily basis through the counterculture internet community, often by vested interests, vying for the hearts and minds of a disillusioned and vulnerable post-financial crisis generation. But just like with any product being pitched by snake oil salesmen there is a twist. The marketing reads “fairer system for all” but the content is actually intended quite strategically to concentrate wealth amongst the view and increase inequality more generally. Proponents of Bitcoin (and gold), of course, cry out for its currency status. But while the nature of money has been long debated, there is a general consensus that its core attributes consist of it being a stable store of value, a universal unit of account and a liquid form of exchange. Some have even argued it is primitive version of technological memory.
If last week has shown anything, it is that the Bitcoin system is fundamentally flawed in that capacity. It is at worst a useless commodity and at best a speculative asset class resembling an investment in a high-risk technology stock. Or even worse than that a money laundering scheme for criminal economy. If it was a currency, it would be a deflationary one by design — hardly the makings of a viable monetary system that spreads wealth. The problem lies in the rigidity of the source code, and its inherent inflexibility and volatility. In a normal commodity market when prices go up, the mining industry responds by producing more to capture as much of the price rise as possible. This inevitably brings more supply to the market, leading prices to adjust to the downside. At that point miners rein in their supply and a new price equilibrium is set. The only exception to that model is if speculators believe, for some reason — perhaps due to marketing — that miners will never be able to satisfy demand in the future even with increased production today. In that case speculators end up paying too high a price for the commodity’s delivery in the future, which incentivises miners to keep producing regardless. These supplies, instead of being consumed, go into financialised hoards — kept safe for the eventual day that consumption demand returns. Like the biblical Joseph encouraging pharaoh to hoard during the seven years of plenty. With Bitcoin (and gold), however, there is never any potential for consumption. These coins can never be consumed, leaving them fit only for hoarding. Miners can also never produce more to respond to a demand shock, making them in some ways worse than the now-notoriously indisciplined Opec cartel. For Bitcoin, when prices go up, production discipline is maintained by the need to solve a statistical cryptogramme, whose difficulty increases as more players enter the game. If you happen to crack the code you get to benefit from the high price. If you don’t, you have to invest in more computer power so that the code can be cracked more quickly. Consequently, the perception of a shortage in the future is always maintained and prices continue to go up until the rush of speculative “retail” interest realises that there is more logic in learning how to mine than in competing for existing supply. When that happens, demand is diverted from speculative inflow to production — or perhaps even into forging a competitive system (like Litecoin, or Ripple) that compromises the monopoly. Either way, the inflection point creates a powerful incentive for more-established miners to cash out. It is greed and fear in its purest form. At that point, the dam holding back hoarded supply inevitably breaks, and the price has no choice but to correct lower. At least until a new Bitcoin cartel can be revived. Exactly the same mechanics apply to gold.
All that said, the phenomenon has had its uses. People are debating the nature of money and the economic system on an entirely new level. It has also taught us that the current e-money infrastructure must be lacking in some capacity. A better universal payments system on a digital level, though hopefully one underpinned by central bank digital currency and not new manifestations of gold in digital form, is what we should be striving for instead.
submitted by Aniolla to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

some questions for smarterer shibes

here are some of my concers regarding the future of crypto currencies and i hope someone smarter than me can debunk my issues. i also hope my english is sufficient.
as i understand it "mining" is just an entropy pissing contest, the one who wastes the most energy (by making the most guesses while trial and error "solving" meaningless mathematical inequations) has the highest chance of "winning the lottery".
question one: would it be possible to use the calculation power of the network to something more meaningful, e.g. [email protected] or [email protected] or similar while still ensuring the functionality of a decentralized blockchain ?
as the finite number of coins of a currency approaches its limit the rewards for each block go down. at the end only the transaction fees will be distributed between the miners. am i right in the assumption that the relative net hashrate would drop until the difficulty is so low that the costs of hashing (electricity) is covered by the now low rewards. imagine the whole networks mining power is only at 10% of what it was. almost everybody quit mining because it wouldn't even cover the power costs. in as an example bitcoin right now there is one "mining pool" that has over 30% of the whole networks hashing power. wouldn't it be possible for anybody, or better, any corporation with such a high hashing power to completely alter the blockchain to its will by switching the pool on/off as it pleases ? so could a huge company with a very big server farm switch it's servers to mining for let's say an hour immediately after they've given a huge transaction to alter the blockchain so that it says they diddn't.
if so, are there any ideas/ways to prevent this ?
thanks in advance
submitted by lewwerwoschd to dogecoin [link] [comments]

Radio Host goes Anti-BTC, help me set this straight.

So the following negative article was written by a radio host that is obviously of a different mindset regarding Bitcoin. I would like to ask my fellow bitcoin enthusiasts to rebut and set this straight. I'd like to address this to Mr Dietrich. I am requesting your assistance in forming a logical and comprehensive reply to the points addressed here:
BITCOIN PROVES THE LIBERTARIAN IDEAL OF PARADISE IS HELL-ON-EARTH DOP (Direct Open Post) From MISTER SHON CLEMONS To > DOUGLAS DUANE DIETRICH: "Douglas, I was curious as to your thoughts on Bit Coins and the surge to make all drugs across the board legal and the advent of darknet BlackMarket sites such as The Silkroad and Agora? I reference silk road because that is the one most are aware of due to the media. "There are many such sites on the DarkNet as I am sure you are aware of. "Such sites are no different than a gun or even knowledge. It can be used with honorable or dishonorable intent."
Per DOUGLAS DIETRICH: Not So By Way of Bitcoinage, Mister Clemons. As a Supervillain-of-Necessity myself, I can Assure Thee BITCOIN IS FOR CRIMINALS. Libertarians love Bitcoin (a Warning Signal if ever there was one [Libertarians Advocate Elimination of Child Labour Laws]).
About 44% of the online cryptocurrency's users self-identify as Libertarians (id est, Clinical Psychopaths). They love the fact that it's not controlled by a government or central bank — so no online Fed can "print" more of it and inflate our way out of trouble. They love that it's decentralized; it's the currency of The People, not The Man. They love that it's "mined," a bit like gold, because that makes it a bit like the gold standard, which libertarians think real currencies ought to be tied to. They love that Bitcoin isn't taxed, so you can hide your income from the government if you want to. They love the way its value reflects pure supply and demand, and not a value forced into the system by regulation or monopoly. And they love that it's fairly lawless — it's difficult to enforce rules (other than the rules of the market) when everyone in the market is anonymous.
So the Bitcoin experience gives us a glimpse of Libertarian paradise: What life would be like with as little government interference as possible, in a market free of burdensome laws and taxes. Unfortunately, that experience proves itself a total nightmare. It's characterized by radical instability, chaos, the rise of a boss-class of criminals who assassinate people they don't like, and a mass handover of wealth to a minority even smaller than the 1% that currently lauds it in the United States.
If Bitcoin were a state — Libertarialand ? — it would be like Somalia (a State-In-Failure). Consider: Bitcoin is most exploitable to Sociopaths.
Currently, for ordinary people, cash and credit work just fine. While some mainstream businesses do take Bitcoin, there is no compelling reason — yet — for ordinary people to use it. If you're a criminal, however, there are very compelling reasons to use it: you can transfer vast sums of cash completely anonymously. Cash transfers are a real problem for criminals. When you can't use bank accounts, lugging around vast sums of cash gets old pretty quickly. Bitcoin solves that. So Bitcoin is very, very empowering for criminals. The Bitcoin "Economy" manifests as a crime wave.
Given that Bitcoin is good for criminals, it should not be surprising that those criminals are targeting other Bitcoin users for thefts. The most spectacular theft so far is the Sheep Marketplace robbery, in which one hacker appears to have emptied a massive Bitcoin marketplace of up to U$D220 million in Bitcoins. Note that Sheep Marketplace was basically a trading post for drug dealers. Bitcoin exchange and account thefts are very common. Herewith a historical scan of recent moral atrocities as committed in currency of Bitcoinaige.
Bitcoin-backed Libertarian "law" is enforced by paid assassins.
The most shocking aspect about the indictment of the Silk Road operator Ross Ulbricht was not the amount of money in Bitcoin he controlled (U$D28 million, approximated). Rather, it was the fact that when other drug dealers ripped him off, he didn't put it down as the price of doing business. Instead, he is accused of hiring a hitman to murder six people he believed had stolen from him. Ulbricht was a Libertarian. In other words, there will be laws in the Bitcoin Libertarian paradise: And the people with the most Bitcoins will decide what that law is, when it should be applied, and how "justice" will be meted out. In Libertarialand, the sentence for nonviolent financial crimes evidently includes the death penalty.
There is literally a Bitcoin market for assassinations.
There have always been people engaging in murder for hire, using old-fashioned cash. But the operator of this Bitcoin website seems to believe that Bitcoin creates enough anonymity to allow assassination to take place "at scale (to borrow the parlance of the tech startup world)." He wants to destroy "all governments, everywhere." Bitcoin as a currency is horribly unstable.
This chart (e[lectronically]-ttached) tells you all you need to know. One day you're rich, when Bitcoin approaches U$D1200; the next day half your wealth is wiped out as it plummets to U$D700. Bitcoin isn't backed by any government's bonds or central bank gold. It's literally an asset without an underlying asset. So its price is determined entirely by its flows.
Libertarialand makes the Weimar Republic look sedate. Even if you could live with the crime, the instability makes transactions wildly unfair to the party on the downside. Bitcoin has produced farcical wealth inequality.
Libertarians don't care about inequality, of course. They see it as a reflection of individuals' natural talents, and as an incentive to work harder. But even the most hardcore free marketeer ought to blanche at the incredible level of inequality already endemic to Bitcoin. Just 47 individuals own nearly one-third of all Bitcoins. About 927 people control half the entire currency. There are just over 1 million Bitcoin holders — the vast majority of them own mere crumbs.
Bitcoin hoarding will inevitably produce a cartel that controls all Bitcoin. A study from Cornell has concluded that if Bitcoin miners co-öperate, they could end up controlling most Bitcoins and thus control the currency's price. The cartel could beggar or enrich all Bitcoin holders overnight, depending on how they trade it.
That kind of thing just doesn't happen with the dollar.
Even if you can live with the crime, the inequality and the cartel, you might not tolerate the accidental chaos. When you have a normal bank account with cash in it, you're almost guaranteed not to lose the money. The bank can burn to the ground, be robbed or even go out of business and because of federal deposit insurance you'll always get your money back. You can't "lose" US dollars if they're parked in a checking account.
Not so with Bitcoin. If you're ever unlucky or careless with your Bitcoin wallet, you're just completely f__ked: This guy lost about U$D600 because he reset his mobile phone — permanently deleting his Bitcoin wallet. This guy threw away an old hard drive — and now he's looking for U$D6.5 million in a landfill. This guy lost about U$D90 000 because he hit "delete" at the wrong time. Sure, the entire Bitcoin economy isn't run by criminals YET — but it WILL be. There is a price to pay for the freedom and anonymity that Bitcoin provides, and that price is a lack of enforceable laws that benefits only the most ruthless.
The Bitcoin dream of Libertarianism is a literally criminal idea, and you don't ever want to live there ....
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Date: 2013-05-24
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Hi all! I was wondering, what do you think it would take to get bitcoin from a niche currency used mainly by internet denizens to go mainstraim? I know the slow creep of more small companies accepting bitcoin helps, but what do you think that final cusp will be, and will it ever come to that? Thanks for taking the time to do this! There are several potential tipping points, but my favorite one is a large corporation accepting Bitcoin.
Amazon has an incredibly small operating margin, less than 1% - They have more than that in transaction costs, so if they were to accept Bitcoins for product and offer Bitcoins as payment to their affiliates it would cause a rush of other companies to jump onboard for the same reasons.
Once that happens with one large company, it sets a precedent. Doing something new is scary, and when the regulatory environment is uncertain like it is with Bitcoin the choice to accept could potentially cost you a lot of money later if it's retroactively made not OK and the value of the currency plummets.
But once a company like Amazon or Google jumps in, they have enough political swing and momentum that attacking Bitcoin becomes attacking them, and they'll fight that tooth and nail if it's saving them money.
Another example of a tipping point would be a country, ANY country, adopting it as their formal currency OR issuing a