Everything You Should Know About Bitcoin Address Formats

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Bitcoin Cash: Peer-to-Peer Electronic Cash (BCH)

Bitcoin Cash (BCH) brings sound money to the world. Merchants and users are empowered with low fees and reliable confirmations. The future shines brightly with unrestricted growth, global adoption, permissionless innovation, and decentralized development. All Bitcoin holders as of block 478558 are now owners of Bitcoin Cash. All Bitcoiners are welcome to join the Bitcoin Cash community as we move forward in creating sound money accessible to the whole world.
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So I get a fairly constant stream of people who send me messages about situations where they have sent Bitcoin to a BCH address and don't know what to do. Fortunately, recovery in this situation is straight forward and can be done directly with your hardware wallet.

So I get a fairly constant stream of people who send me messages about situations where they have sent Bitcoin to a BCH address and don't know what to do. Fortunately, recovery in this situation is straight forward and can be done directly with your hardware wallet. submitted by Crypto-Guide to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

So I get a fairly constant stream of people who send me messages about situations where they have done things like sent Litecoin to a Bitcoin Segwit address and don't know what to do. Fortunately, recovery in this situation is straight forward and can be done directly with your hardware wallet.

So I get a fairly constant stream of people who send me messages about situations where they have done things like sent Litecoin to a Bitcoin Segwit address and don't know what to do. Fortunately, recovery in this situation is straight forward and can be done directly with your hardware wallet. submitted by Crypto-Guide to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

What's the worst thing that can be done to a would-be scammer/blackmailer if all you really have is the bitcoin wallet address they provided for payment?

submitted by AnGabhaDubh to AskReddit [link] [comments]

For Beginners: Vanity addresses. Explaining what vanity addresses are and how you can set up your own address

For Beginners: Vanity addresses. Explaining what vanity addresses are and how you can set up your own address

https://preview.redd.it/16hk9v71y1v11.png?width=2970&format=png&auto=webp&s=aea305e2f81d5280de5c24680af6b93cd09e1486
When accessing or setting up your own Bitcoin wallet, you may notice that it just ends up being a bunch of numbers and letters that have no relevance to you or anything involved with you. What if you had the ability, though, to personalize that Bitcoin address so that it wasn’t just another random string of numbers and letter? Well, that’s exactly what vanity addresses are used for, giving you the opportunity to create a Bitcoin wallet which contains certain starting letters that spell out words like your name or brand. Let’s discuss these vanity addresses some more and learn how you can make your own personalized address.
This is not financial investment advice. This article will explain what vanity addresses are and how you can make your own.

Terminology

Bitcoin Wallet: A Bitcoin wallet is a software program where Bitcoins are stored. To be technically accurate, Bitcoins are not stored anywhere; there is a private key (secret number) for every Bitcoin address that is saved in the Bitcoin wallet of the person who owns the balance. Bitcoin wallets facilitate sending and receiving Bitcoins and gives ownership of the Bitcoin balance to the user.
Wallet Address: A Bitcoin wallet address is similar to a bank account number. It’s a unique 26-35 digit combination of letters and numbers and it looks something like this: 1ExAmpLe0FaBiTco1NADr3sSV5tsGaMF6hd
You can share your Bitcoin wallet address with others. With this, they will be able to send you Bitcoin.
Public Key: A cryptographic code that allows a user to receive cryptocurrencies into his or her account. The public key coupled with the private key are significant tools required to ensure the security of the crypto economy.

Familiarize yourself with these key terms in order to better understand how vanity addresses work.

What’s A Vanity Address?

To put simply, a vanity address is a Bitcoin address with certain starting letters that spell out words such as your name or your brand. This can make your own wallet stand out when receiving or sending Bitcoin, as it can tie in your name or any other word you might want as part of your Bitcoin wallet address. Think of your wallet address as your bank number which you give or show to people so that they can send you cryptocurrencies.
Currently, most - if not all - Bitcoin addresses are just made up of random numbers and letters. Getting a vanity address will definitely make you stand out and give your wallet a unique aspect. Here’s an example of what a basic vanity address would look like:

1googLemzFVj8ALj6mfBsbifRoD4miY36v

A vanity address is essentially a personalized bitcoin address. Most - if not all - Bitcoin wallet addresses are just a string of random letters and numbers, so getting a vanity address gives your wallet a unique aspect.

How Can I Make My Own?

There are two methods to create your own vanity address. The first way is to do it yourself, which is probably the most secure way as nobody can see the private key and public key pair. This does involve knowing a little bit of computing and downloading the correct software. You can then choose how much of your processing power you wish to dedicate to the process, but be aware that dedicating a large proportion of your CPU can make the program crash.
The other method - which might not be as secure - is to go onto a pool such as bitcoinvanitygen.com where you can outsource the work to Bitcoin vanity address miners. These miners dedicate their CPU & GPU power to finding the address you want and send it to you either via email or in the post (if you are paying for it). Although this is a quick process, there is the risk that miners could hold onto the private key that generated the address and use it at some point in the future to hack your funds and steal the millions your vanity address has stored in it.

To get a vanity address you can either make you own, which is the most secure way, or outsource it to vanity address miners.

Conclusion

When the world of cryptocurrency begins to get a bit boring, vanity addresses introduce a unique and even creative aspect to the process of sending and receiving cryptocurrencies. If you ever want to spice things up or make your address stand out, you can always get a vanity address to do so. Although it does take a significant amount of computing power, generating these addresses can make your overall experience much more personalized and allow you to stand out among other wallets.
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Have you made a vanity address before? Let us know why in the comments!
submitted by CoinBundle to u/CoinBundle [link] [comments]

I tried to bump a transaction time using CPFP in the Mycelium app, and now half of the balance on my wallet is being transferred to another address. What is going on? Did i just make an expensive mistake? /r/Bitcoin

I tried to bump a transaction time using CPFP in the Mycelium app, and now half of the balance on my wallet is being transferred to another address. What is going on? Did i just make an expensive mistake? /Bitcoin submitted by cryptoanalyticabot to cryptoall [link] [comments]

Can someone in this group do a simple explanation of wallets & what the prefixes mean? For example: this is one of my Bitcoin addresses-- 19KKcqaJvGFKHC8KJiaHr7m6n1w6E4TZT5 so how on my Nano S do I update to Sedwic... Or do I even need to? Some on this group are saying the Sedwic address is better?

submitted by apharmtech to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

I tried to bump a transaction time using CPFP in the Mycelium app, and now half of the balance on my wallet is being transferred to another address. What is going on? Did i just make an expensive mistake? /r/Bitcoin

I tried to bump a transaction time using CPFP in the Mycelium app, and now half of the balance on my wallet is being transferred to another address. What is going on? Did i just make an expensive mistake? /Bitcoin submitted by ABitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

What will happen if I recover my funds with Electrum wallet from only one private key (not seed)? Exactly, Q1: How can I get my change address and my private key to this change address? Q2: Is there such a "BIP" to derive the whole needed tree structure from one private key? /r/Bitcoin

What will happen if I recover my funds with Electrum wallet from only one private key (not seed)? Exactly, Q1: How can I get my change address and my private key to this change address? Q2: Is there such a submitted by ABitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Hey everyone, I’ve got a bunch of bitcoin in a wallet from back in 2013 but I’ve deleted all of my wallet apps since and now only remembered about them now is the last transaction id that I sent to the wallet as well as the bitcoin address number what can I do to find out which wallet I used

submitted by Lordspitemedown to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Can someone in this group do a simple explanation of wallets & what the prefixes mean? For example: this is one of my Bitcoin addresses-- 19KKcqaJvGFKHC8KJiaHr7m6n1w6E4TZT5 so how on my Nano S do I update to Sedwic... Or do I even need to? Some on this group are saying the Sedwic address /r/Bitcoin

Can someone in this group do a simple explanation of wallets & what the prefixes mean? For example: this is one of my Bitcoin addresses-- 19KKcqaJvGFKHC8KJiaHr7m6n1w6E4TZT5 so how on my Nano S do I update to Sedwic... Or do I even need to? Some on this group are saying the Sedwic address /Bitcoin submitted by HiIAMCaptainObvious to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

I have an old wallet.dat that I've loaded into bitcoin core - it shows a few small incoming transactions, and it's up to date with the network, but the balance is 0.00 and the incoming address shows not to have been used in blockchain.info. Any idea what that's about?

Best guess is that it's a wallet.dat from another coin - any way to determine which one?
Update: turns out it was a dogecoin wallet. So - bitcoin core loaded it and showed that there were some incoming BTC ... don't know why it loaded at all, but I know nobody has sent me several hundred thousand BTC.
submitted by kickasstimus to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

What is the difference between an xpub address, a HD wallet, and a BIP32 key? /r/Bitcoin

What is the difference between an xpub address, a HD wallet, and a BIP32 key? /Bitcoin submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Paper wallet as a tip in restaurants etc? what is the website address? /r/Bitcoin

Paper wallet as a tip in restaurants etc? what is the website address? /Bitcoin submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

I have an old wallet.dat that I've loaded into bitcoin core - it shows a few small incoming transactions, and it's up to date with the network, but the balance is 0.00 and the incoming address shows not to have been used in blockchain.info. Any idea what that's about? /r/Bitcoin

I have an old wallet.dat that I've loaded into bitcoin core - it shows a few small incoming transactions, and it's up to date with the network, but the balance is 0.00 and the incoming address shows not to have been used in blockchain.info. Any idea what that's about? /Bitcoin submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Restored a pre-fork wallet from backup post-fork, and sent coins to a new wallet. Blockchain shows coins move through multiple unfamiliar wallets (dated pre-fork) to the address of new one (dated post-fork)? What happened and is the BCC unrecoverable? /r/Bitcoin

Restored a pre-fork wallet from backup post-fork, and sent coins to a new wallet. Blockchain shows coins move through multiple unfamiliar wallets (dated pre-fork) to the address of new one (dated post-fork)? What happened and is the BCC unrecoverable? /Bitcoin submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Hey guys I'm new to bit coin, my question is what happens if I accidentally type in the wrong wallet address? Like not capitalize a letter or something? /r/Bitcoin

Hey guys I'm new to bit coin, my question is what happens if I accidentally type in the wrong wallet address? Like not capitalize a letter or something? /Bitcoin submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Is it safe to buy a cold storage wallet off eBay or elsewhere? What's to keep the seller from jotting down the addresses and accessing later? /r/Bitcoin

Is it safe to buy a cold storage wallet off eBay or elsewhere? What's to keep the seller from jotting down the addresses and accessing later? /Bitcoin submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Maybe a stupid question but....is it possible to identify who/what a btc address/wallet belongs to? /r/Bitcoin

Maybe a stupid question but....is it possible to identify who/what a btc address/wallet belongs to? /Bitcoin submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

What is an xpub address and how is it different from usual bitcoin addresses? I created a new wallet on blockchain.info and it works nothing like it used to. /r/Bitcoin

What is an xpub address and how is it different from usual bitcoin addresses? I created a new wallet on blockchain.info and it works nothing like it used to. /Bitcoin submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

What is a good blockchain explorer for mobile devices? Or are there any wallets that allow looking up addresses? /r/Bitcoin

What is a good blockchain explorer for mobile devices? Or are there any wallets that allow looking up addresses? /Bitcoin submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Technical: Taproot: Why Activate?

This is a follow-up on https://old.reddit.com/Bitcoin/comments/hqzp14/technical_the_path_to_taproot_activation/
Taproot! Everybody wants it!! But... you might ask yourself: sure, everybody else wants it, but why would I, sovereign Bitcoin HODLer, want it? Surely I can be better than everybody else because I swapped XXX fiat for Bitcoin unlike all those nocoiners?
And it is important for you to know the reasons why you, o sovereign Bitcoiner, would want Taproot activated. After all, your nodes (or the nodes your wallets use, which if you are SPV, you hopefully can pester to your wallet vendoimplementor about) need to be upgraded in order for Taproot activation to actually succeed instead of becoming a hot sticky mess.
First, let's consider some principles of Bitcoin.
I'm sure most of us here would agree that the above are very important principles of Bitcoin and that these are principles we would not be willing to remove. If anything, we would want those principles strengthened (especially the last one, financial privacy, which current Bitcoin is only sporadically strong with: you can get privacy, it just requires effort to do so).
So, how does Taproot affect those principles?

Taproot and Your /Coins

Most HODLers probably HODL their coins in singlesig addresses. Sadly, switching to Taproot would do very little for you (it gives a mild discount at spend time, at the cost of a mild increase in fee at receive time (paid by whoever sends to you, so if it's a self-send from a P2PKH or bech32 address, you pay for this); mostly a wash).
(technical details: a Taproot output is 1 version byte + 32 byte public key, while a P2WPKH (bech32 singlesig) output is 1 version byte + 20 byte public key hash, so the Taproot output spends 12 bytes more; spending from a P2WPKH requires revealing a 32-byte public key later, which is not needed with Taproot, and Taproot signatures are about 9 bytes smaller than P2WPKH signatures, but the 32 bytes plus 9 bytes is divided by 4 because of the witness discount, so it saves about 11 bytes; mostly a wash, it increases blockweight by about 1 virtual byte, 4 weight for each Taproot-output-input, compared to P2WPKH-output-input).
However, as your HODLings grow in value, you might start wondering if multisignature k-of-n setups might be better for the security of your savings. And it is in multisignature that Taproot starts to give benefits!
Taproot switches to using Schnorr signing scheme. Schnorr makes key aggregation -- constructing a single public key from multiple public keys -- almost as trivial as adding numbers together. "Almost" because it involves some fairly advanced math instead of simple boring number adding, but hey when was the last time you added up your grocery list prices by hand huh?
With current P2SH and P2WSH multisignature schemes, if you have a 2-of-3 setup, then to spend, you need to provide two different signatures from two different public keys. With Taproot, you can create, using special moon math, a single public key that represents your 2-of-3 setup. Then you just put two of your devices together, have them communicate to each other (this can be done airgapped, in theory, by sending QR codes: the software to do this is not even being built yet, but that's because Taproot hasn't activated yet!), and they will make a single signature to authorize any spend from your 2-of-3 address. That's 73 witness bytes -- 18.25 virtual bytes -- of signatures you save!
And if you decide that your current setup with 1-of-1 P2PKH / P2WPKH addresses is just fine as-is: well, that's the whole point of a softfork: backwards-compatibility; you can receive from Taproot users just fine, and once your wallet is updated for Taproot-sending support, you can send to Taproot users just fine as well!
(P2WPKH and P2WSH -- SegWit v0 -- addresses start with bc1q; Taproot -- SegWit v1 --- addresses start with bc1p, in case you wanted to know the difference; in bech32 q is 0, p is 1)
Now how about HODLers who keep all, or some, of their coins on custodial services? Well, any custodial service worth its salt would be doing at least 2-of-3, or probably something even bigger, like 11-of-15. So your custodial service, if it switched to using Taproot internally, could save a lot more (imagine an 11-of-15 getting reduced from 11 signatures to just 1!), which --- we can only hope! --- should translate to lower fees and better customer service from your custodial service!
So I think we can say, very accurately, that the Bitcoin principle --- that YOU are in control of your money --- can only be helped by Taproot (if you are doing multisignature), and, because P2PKH and P2WPKH remain validly-usable addresses in a Taproot future, will not be harmed by Taproot. Its benefit to this principle might be small (it mostly only benefits multisignature users) but since it has no drawbacks with this (i.e. singlesig users can continue to use P2WPKH and P2PKH still) this is still a nice, tidy win!
(even singlesig users get a minor benefit, in that multisig users will now reduce their blockchain space footprint, so that fees can be kept low for everybody; so for example even if you have your single set of private keys engraved on titanium plates sealed in an airtight box stored in a safe buried in a desert protected by angry nomads riding giant sandworms because you're the frickin' Kwisatz Haderach, you still gain some benefit from Taproot)
And here's the important part: if P2PKH/P2WPKH is working perfectly fine with you and you decide to never use Taproot yourself, Taproot will not affect you detrimentally. First do no harm!

Taproot and Your Contracts

No one is an island, no one lives alone. Give and you shall receive. You know: by trading with other people, you can gain expertise in some obscure little necessity of the world (and greatly increase your productivity in that little field), and then trade the products of your expertise for necessities other people have created, all of you thereby gaining gains from trade.
So, contracts, which are basically enforceable agreements that facilitate trading with people who you do not personally know and therefore might not trust.
Let's start with a simple example. You want to buy some gewgaws from somebody. But you don't know them personally. The seller wants the money, you want their gewgaws, but because of the lack of trust (you don't know them!! what if they're scammers??) neither of you can benefit from gains from trade.
However, suppose both of you know of some entity that both of you trust. That entity can act as a trusted escrow. The entity provides you security: this enables the trade, allowing both of you to get gains from trade.
In Bitcoin-land, this can be implemented as a 2-of-3 multisignature. The three signatories in the multisgnature would be you, the gewgaw seller, and the escrow. You put the payment for the gewgaws into this 2-of-3 multisignature address.
Now, suppose it turns out neither of you are scammers (whaaaat!). You receive the gewgaws just fine and you're willing to pay up for them. Then you and the gewgaw seller just sign a transaction --- you and the gewgaw seller are 2, sufficient to trigger the 2-of-3 --- that spends from the 2-of-3 address to a singlesig the gewgaw seller wants (or whatever address the gewgaw seller wants).
But suppose some problem arises. The seller gave you gawgews instead of gewgaws. Or you decided to keep the gewgaws but not sign the transaction to release the funds to the seller. In either case, the escrow is notified, and if it can sign with you to refund the funds back to you (if the seller was a scammer) or it can sign with the seller to forward the funds to the seller (if you were a scammer).
Taproot helps with this: like mentioned above, it allows multisignature setups to produce only one signature, reducing blockchain space usage, and thus making contracts --- which require multiple people, by definition, you don't make contracts with yourself --- is made cheaper (which we hope enables more of these setups to happen for more gains from trade for everyone, also, moon and lambos).
(technology-wise, it's easier to make an n-of-n than a k-of-n, making a k-of-n would require a complex setup involving a long ritual with many communication rounds between the n participants, but an n-of-n can be done trivially with some moon math. You can, however, make what is effectively a 2-of-3 by using a three-branch SCRIPT: either 2-of-2 of you and seller, OR 2-of-2 of you and escrow, OR 2-of-2 of escrow and seller. Fortunately, Taproot adds a facility to embed a SCRIPT inside a public key, so you can have a 2-of-2 Taprooted address (between you and seller) with a SCRIPT branch that can instead be spent with 2-of-2 (you + escrow) OR 2-of-2 (seller + escrow), which implements the three-branched SCRIPT above. If neither of you are scammers (hopefully the common case) then you both sign using your keys and never have to contact the escrow, since you are just using the escrow public key without coordinating with them (because n-of-n is trivial but k-of-n requires setup with communication rounds), so in the "best case" where both of you are honest traders, you also get a privacy boost, in that the escrow never learns you have been trading on gewgaws, I mean ewww, gawgews are much better than gewgaws and therefore I now judge you for being a gewgaw enthusiast, you filthy gewgawer).

Taproot and Your Contracts, Part 2: Cryptographic Boogaloo

Now suppose you want to buy some data instead of things. For example, maybe you have some closed-source software in trial mode installed, and want to pay the developer for the full version. You want to pay for an activation code.
This can be done, today, by using an HTLC. The developer tells you the hash of the activation code. You pay to an HTLC, paying out to the developer if it reveals the preimage (the activation code), or refunding the money back to you after a pre-agreed timeout. If the developer claims the funds, it has to reveal the preimage, which is the activation code, and you can now activate your software. If the developer does not claim the funds by the timeout, you get refunded.
And you can do that, with HTLCs, today.
Of course, HTLCs do have problems:
Fortunately, with Schnorr (which is enabled by Taproot), we can now use the Scriptless Script constuction by Andrew Poelstra. This Scriptless Script allows a new construction, the PTLC or Pointlocked Timelocked Contract. Instead of hashes and preimages, just replace "hash" with "point" and "preimage" with "scalar".
Or as you might know them: "point" is really "public key" and "scalar" is really a "private key". What a PTLC does is that, given a particular public key, the pointlocked branch can be spent only if the spender reveals the private key of the given public key to you.
Another nice thing with PTLCs is that they are deniable. What appears onchain is just a single 2-of-2 signature between you and the developemanufacturer. It's like a magic trick. This signature has no special watermarks, it's a perfectly normal signature (the pledge). However, from this signature, plus some datta given to you by the developemanufacturer (known as the adaptor signature) you can derive the private key of a particular public key you both agree on (the turn). Anyone scraping the blockchain will just see signatures that look just like every other signature, and as long as nobody manages to hack you and get a copy of the adaptor signature or the private key, they cannot get the private key behind the public key (point) that the pointlocked branch needs (the prestige).
(Just to be clear, the public key you are getting the private key from, is distinct from the public key that the developemanufacturer will use for its funds. The activation key is different from the developer's onchain Bitcoin key, and it is the activation key whose private key you will be learning, not the developer's/manufacturer's onchain Bitcoin key).
So:
Taproot lets PTLCs exist onchain because they enable Schnorr, which is a requirement of PTLCs / Scriptless Script.
(technology-wise, take note that Scriptless Script works only for the "pointlocked" branch of the contract; you need normal Script, or a pre-signed nLockTimed transaction, for the "timelocked" branch. Since Taproot can embed a script, you can have the Taproot pubkey be a 2-of-2 to implement the Scriptless Script "pointlocked" branch, then have a hidden script that lets you recover the funds with an OP_CHECKLOCKTIMEVERIFY after the timeout if the seller does not claim the funds.)

Quantum Quibbles!

Now if you were really paying attention, you might have noticed this parenthetical:
(technical details: a Taproot output is 1 version byte + 32 byte public key, while a P2WPKH (bech32 singlesig) output is 1 version byte + 20 byte public key hash...)
So wait, Taproot uses raw 32-byte public keys, and not public key hashes? Isn't that more quantum-vulnerable??
Well, in theory yes. In practice, they probably are not.
It's not that hashes can be broken by quantum computes --- they're still not. Instead, you have to look at how you spend from a P2WPKH/P2PKH pay-to-public-key-hash.
When you spend from a P2PKH / P2WPKH, you have to reveal the public key. Then Bitcoin hashes it and checks if this matches with the public-key-hash, and only then actually validates the signature for that public key.
So an unconfirmed transaction, floating in the mempools of nodes globally, will show, in plain sight for everyone to see, your public key.
(public keys should be public, that's why they're called public keys, LOL)
And if quantum computers are fast enough to be of concern, then they are probably fast enough that, in the several minutes to several hours from broadcast to confirmation, they have already cracked the public key that is openly broadcast with your transaction. The owner of the quantum computer can now replace your unconfirmed transaction with one that pays the funds to itself. Even if you did not opt-in RBF, miners are still incentivized to support RBF on RBF-disabled transactions.
So the extra hash is not as significant a protection against quantum computers as you might think. Instead, the extra hash-and-compare needed is just extra validation effort.
Further, if you have ever, in the past, spent from the address, then there exists already a transaction indelibly stored on the blockchain, openly displaying the public key from which quantum computers can derive the private key. So those are still vulnerable to quantum computers.
For the most part, the cryptographers behind Taproot (and Bitcoin Core) are of the opinion that quantum computers capable of cracking Bitcoin pubkeys are unlikely to appear within a decade or two.
So:
For now, the homomorphic and linear properties of elliptic curve cryptography provide a lot of benefits --- particularly the linearity property is what enables Scriptless Script and simple multisignature (i.e. multisignatures that are just 1 signature onchain). So it might be a good idea to take advantage of them now while we are still fairly safe against quantum computers. It seems likely that quantum-safe signature schemes are nonlinear (thus losing these advantages).

Summary

I Wanna Be The Taprooter!

So, do you want to help activate Taproot? Here's what you, mister sovereign Bitcoin HODLer, can do!

But I Hate Taproot!!

That's fine!

Discussions About Taproot Activation

submitted by almkglor to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Yay got my first Bitcoin Cash

Yay got my first Bitcoin Cash submitted by arldyalrdy to btc [link] [comments]

What is a Bitcoin Address? Coinbase – How to find your Bitcoin Wallet address 2020! How to Locate your BlockChain Wallet Address What are Bitcoin Wallet ? What is a Luno Bitcoin wallet address

Your BTC address is a string of 26-35 letters and numbers that identify your Bitcoin wallet. BTC addresses begin with either a 1 or a 3 and are case-sensitive. When you want to receive funds, this is the information that you provide to the person paying you. Your BTC address is oftentimes called your wallet address or your public address. What is a Bitcoin Wallet? Bitcoin wallet is an application that contains a collection of public (Bitcoin address) and private keys. As we explained; the public address is the key which you need to receive Bitcoins and private key is the data needed to spend Bitcoins associated with that public address. A wallet address, comprising a string of 26-35 alphanumeric characters, is all it takes to send and receive bitcoin. Any bitcoin address can be used to With multiple address formats to choose from An email address is the best illustration of a Bitcoin Wallet. Once an account/address is established and set up, you can send and receive emails to that account or address. A piece of software like Gmail, Yahoo, or Microsoft allows the communication to route back and forth. Like an email, a Bitcoin Wallet needs a username and password. What is a Bitcoin wallet address? A Bitcoin wallet address is a user identifier. It is a string of alphanumeric numbers and letters the Bitcoin payment network uses to direct payments sent to you by others. Using the email analogy, a Bitcoin wallet address is like an email address that others need to send you an email.

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What is a Bitcoin Address?

Convert between your local currency, Bitcoin and Ethereum with Luno Instant Buy Whether you’re new to digital currency or an advanced user, the Luno Wallet is a must-have for those looking for a ... is to define it as a Bitcoin wallet identifier, of which there can be many. Unlike a bank account number, a Bitcoin wallet can generate an unlimited number of Bitcoin addresses, which can be used... The Super Mario Effect - Tricking Your Brain into Learning More Mark Rober TEDxPenn - Duration: 15:09. TEDx Talks Recommended for you Go to accounts or choose Bitcoin On the app on the top left corner is your Bitcoin address and scan address. On the website go to Portfolio click Bitcoin and then click receive. Hi friends, this is my next video in the series of BITCOIN. In this video you will get all information about "How to create Bitcoin Wallet". Hope you like this video... ##### What is Bitcoin ...

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