Running a full node using Bitcoin-daemon. Instructions for

[For Hire] Python back-end development, desktop app development, sysadmin and cloud expert

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PM me on Reddit and we can take it from there.
submitted by SkullTech101 to Jobs4Bitcoins [link] [comments]

Homelab collective ressources post!

Hey guys!
I'm fairly new to this sub and to having a home lab in general and I found this community to be so kind and helping, I wanted to give back what I've learned. I'm seeing a lot of questions asked around on improvements and on what to do with x extra hardware so I thought it would be nice to have a thread to regroup that.
 
I'll put here some stuff I gathered and the most common questions I've seen, feel free to contribute and i'll update the post along.
 
Latest Additions
 
Homelab Dashboard
Posts about dashboards have been growing lately and here are some of the best that were kind enough to provide us with their sources.
User Screenshot Source
yours truly http://imgur.com/a/GhCNH https://github.com/Gabisonfire/dashboard-q
lastditchefrt http://i.imgur.com/5zQdao4.png https://github.com/d4rk22/Network-Status-Page
_SleepingBag_ http://i.imgur.com/Ql9ZM4W.png https://github.com/jsank/homelabdash
NiknakSi https://niknak.org/extras/sysinfo TBA
DainBramaged http://imgur.com/jYNlUEQ https://github.com/gordonturneBigBoard
michaelh4u https://i.imgur.com/XkZwMKj.png https://github.com/michaelh4u/homelabfrontpage
spigotx http://imgur.com/a/1zMht https://github.com/spigotx/HomeLab2
SirMaster https://nicko88.com/ https://github.com/dashbad/plex-server-status
yourofl10 http://imgur.com/a/AyROa TBA
TheBobWiley http://imgur.com/a/oU6d3 https://github.com/TheBobWiley/ManageThis-LandingPages
0110010001100010 http://i.imgur.com/iwtQcsL.jpg https://github.com/danodemano/monitoring-scripts
mescon & SyNiK4L https://i.imgur.com/gqdVM6p.jpg https://github.com/mescon/Muximux
ak_rex http://i.imgur.com/a/RJkrT https://github.com/ak-rex/homelab-dashboard
 
Or build yours from scratch: PRTG API, ELK, Grafana, freeboard, JumpSquares
 
Some other resources: Custom Monitoring Scripts by 0110010001100010
 
Credits to apt64 for his original post
= Pi specific =
 
= Download Automation =
 
= Virtualization =
 
= Monitoring =
 
= Media Center =
 
= Remote access =
 
= VOIP =
 
= Networking =
 
= File Servers/Storage/RAID =
 
= Cameras =
 
= Documentation =
 
= Dynamic DNS =
 
= Backup =
 
= Creating network diagrams =
 
= Guides =
 
= Misc =
 
That's all I could come up with on top of my head + some research, passing over to you guys so we can get a nice complete list!
 
Let's try and stick with free(or mostly) softwares, let me know if you guys feel otherwise.
submitted by Gabisonfire to homelab [link] [comments]

A Guide to Keeping Keys Offline Using Armory +rPi

Hi Redditors.
I am going to post in this thread my experiences in getting my Desktop (Debian) machine running Armory in watch-only mode, and coupling that with an offline Raspberry Pi (which holds my private keys) for signing the transactions previously made in watch-only mode.
I actually compiled Armory from source directly on my Pi. This guide is probably more for the bitcoin 'power user', as to run Armory online, and broadcast the signed transactions, you need to have a bitcoin full node running (bitcoind).
Basic requirements:
Aimed-for Setup:
I'll post the guide in digestible sections...

Section 1

I should begin by saying I installed source code from git, and got Armory to build the DB on my desktop initially, WITHOUT creating a wallet.. (This allowed me to debug what was going on a little!)
Go to Bitcoin.org, select Armory..
It leads to a Download from Git:
https://github.com/goatpig/BitcoinArmory/releases
Followed the procedure for Linux Debian verify code, compile, install, all straight-forward..
Began by running bitcoind, and telling Armory where to find it. This is the command I used, obviously it was all on one line and didn't include the arrows/explanations!:
python ArmoryQt.py \ --satoshi-datadir=/BlockChain/chain20180414/blocks \ # <-----(where my bitcoind blocks live) --datadir=/ArmoryDataDi \ # <-----(this is instead of ~/.armory) --dbdir=/ArmoryDataDidatabases # <-------(again, non std. place used for Armory's databases.. my choice.) 
So, on the Desktop, after the initial "build databases"
(NB the initial "Build Databases" took about 1.5h and my two CPUs were maxed the whole time, Temps up to 62C. Not ideal; Im not in a rush!)
I then wanted to import a watch-only wallet.
Before I did this, I took a full backup of the Armory data dir:
/ArmoryDataDi
(or ~/.armory in a default installation).
I'd hate to have to make Armory do another full sync with the bitcoind node!

Section 2

Next step: offline wallet (with Private Keys) is on a Raspberry Pi.
I downloaded the source and managed to compile it on the pi itself! :)
Though there were some gymnastics needed to setup the Pi.
My Pi is running Raspbian based on Wheezy.. quite old!
I did the following on the Pi:
apt-get update apt-get upgrade (<---took about an hour!) apt-get install autotools-dev apt-get install autoconf 
Then I followed the instructions exactly as I had done for my Debian Desktop machine, EXCEPT:
I had to increase the Pi's swap space. I upped it from 100Mb to 400Mb.
The compilation took 7 hours, and my poor SD card got a thrashing.
But after compilation, I put the Swap back to 100Mb and Armory runs ok with about 150Mb of memory (no swap needed).
Swap increase on the Pi:
use your favourite editor, and open the file /etc/dphys-swapfile
add/change the following line:
CONF_SWAPSIZE=400 
Then, REBOOT the Pi:
sudo shutdown -h -P now 
Once the compilation was done on the Pi, put the swap back, rebooted and created an Armory wallet.
I added manual entropy and upped the encryption 'time' from 250ms to 2500ms - since the Pi is slow, but I'll be happy to wait for more iterations in the Key Derivation Function.
Once the wallet was created, it obviously prompts you for backup.
I want to add a private key of my own (i.e. import), so don't do the backup until this is over.
I import my Private Key, and Armory checks that this corresponds to a Public Key, which I check is correct.
This is the point now where the Pi storage medium (e.g an SD card) has to be properly destroyed if you ever get rid of it.
I had thought that now would be a good time to decide if your new wallet will generate Segwit receiving addresses, and also addresses used to receive 'change' after a transaction..
But it seems Armory WON'T let you switch to P2SH-P2WPKH unless your Armory is connected to a node offering "WITNESS" service.
Obviously, my Pi is offline and will never connect to a node, so the following will not work on the Pi:
NB: I thought about setting this on the Debian "watch-only" wallet, but that would surely mean doom, as the Pi would not know about those addresses and backups might not keep them.. who knows...
So, end result:- no segwit for me just yet in my offline funds.

--If anyone can offer a solution to this, I'd be very grateful--

Section 3

Ok, now this is a good point to back up your wallet on the Pi. It has your imported keys. I choose a Digital Backup - and put it on a USB key, which will never touch the internet and will be stored off-site. I also chose to encrypt it, because I'm good with passwords..
NB: The Armory paper backup will NOT back up your imported private keys, so keep those somewhere if you're not sweeping them. It would be prudent to have an Armory paper backup anyway, but remember it will likely NOT help you with that imported key.
Now for the watch-only copy of the wallet. I want to get the "watch-only" version onto my Desktop Debian machine.
On the Pi, I created (exported to a USB key) a "watching-only" copy of my wallet.
I would use the RECOMMENDED approach, export the "Entire Wallet File".
As you will see below, I initially exported only the ROOT data, which will NOT capture the watching-only part of the Private Key I entered manually above (i.e. the public Key!).
Now, back on the Debian Desktop machine...
I stopped all my crontab jobs; just give Armory uninterrupted CPU/memory/disk...
I also stopped bitcoind and made a backup prior to any watch-only wallet being imported.
I already made a backup of Armory on my Desktop, before any wallet import.
(this was needed, as I made a mistake.. see below)
So on the Debian Desktop machine, I begin by firing up bitcoind.
my command for this is:
./bitcoind -daemon -datadir=/BlockChain/chain20180414 -dbcache=400 -maxmempool=400 

Section 4

I try running Armory like this:
(I'm actually starting Armory from a script - StartArm.sh)
Inside the script StartArm.sh, it has the line:
python ArmoryQt.py --ram-usage=4 --satoshi-datadir=/BlockChain/chain20180414/blocks --datadir=/ArmoryDataDi --dbdir=/ArmoryDataDidatabases 
I know from bitter experience that doing a scan over the blockchain for a new wallet takes a looong time and a lot of CPU, and I'd like it to play nicely; not gobble all the memory and swap and run my 2xCPUs both at 100% for four hours...
So... I aim to run with --ram-usage=X and --thread-count=X
(For me in the end, X=1 but I began with X=4)
I began with --ram-usage=4 (<--- = 4x128Mb)
The result is below...
TypeError: cannot concatenate 'str' and 'int' objects 
It didn't recognise the ram-usage and carried on, crippling my Debian desktop PC.
This is where it gets dangerous; Armory can gobble so much memory and CPU that the windowing environment can cease up, and it can take over 30 minutes just to exit nicely from bitcoind and ArmoryDB.
So, I ssh to the machine from another computer, and keep an eye on it with the command
"free -h" 
I'd also be able to do a "sudo reboot now" if needed from here.

Section 5

So, trying to get my --ram-usage command recognised, I tried this line (added quotes):
python ArmoryQt.py --ram-usage="4" --satoshi-datadir=/BlockChain/chain20180414/blocks --datadir=/ArmoryDataDi --dbdir=/ArmoryDataDidatabases 
But no, same error...
Loading Armory Engine: Armory Version: 0.96.4 Armory Build: None PyBtcWallet Version: 1.35 Detected Operating system: Linux OS Variant : ('debian', '9.4', '') User home-directory : /home/ Satoshi BTC directory : /BlockChain/chain20180414 Armory home dir : /ArmoryDataDi ArmoryDB directory : /ArmoryDataDidatabases Armory settings file : /ArmoryDataDiArmorySettings.txt Armory log file : /ArmoryDataDiarmorylog.txt Do wallet checking : True (ERROR) ArmoryUtils.py:3723 - Unsupported language specified. Defaulting to English (en) (ERROR) ArmoryQt.py:1833 - Failed to start Armory database: cannot concatenate 'str' and 'int' objects Traceback (most recent call last): File "ArmoryQt.py", line 1808, in startArmoryDBIfNecessary TheSDM.spawnDB(str(ARMORY_HOME_DIR), TheBDM.armoryDBDir) File "/BitcoinArmory/SDM.py", line 387, in spawnDB pargs.append('--ram-usage=' + ARMORY_RAM_USAGE) TypeError: cannot concatenate 'str' and 'int' objects 

Section 6

So, I edit the Armory python file SDM.py:
if ARMORY_RAM_USAGE != -1: pargs.append('--ram-usage=4') #COMMENTED THIS, SO I CAN HARDCODE =4 # ' + ARMORY_RAM_USAGE) 
Running it, I now have acknowledgement of the --ram-usage=4:
(WARNING) SDM.py:400 - Spawning DB with command: /BitcoinArmory/ArmoryDB --db-type="DB_FULL" --cookie --satoshi-datadir="/BlockChain/chain20180414/blocks" --datadir="/ArmoryDataDi" --dbdir="/ArmoryDataDidatabases" --ram-usage=4 
Also, even with ram-usage=4, it used too much memory, so I told it to quit.
It took over 30 minutes to stop semi-nicely. The last thing it reported was:
ERROR - 00:25:21: (StringSockets.cpp:351) FcgiSocket::writeAndRead FcgiError: unexpected fcgi header version 
But that didn't seem to matter or corrupt the Armory Database, so I think it's ok.
So, I get brave and change SDM.py as below, and I make sure my script has a command line for --ram-usage="ABCDE" and --thread-count="FGHIJ"; the logic being that these strings "ABCDE" will pass the IF criteria below, and my hardcoded values will be used...
if ARMORY_RAM_USAGE != -1: pargs.append('--ram-usage=1') #COMMENTED THIS, SO I CAN HARDCODE =1 # ' + ARMORY_RAM_USAGE) if ARMORY_THREAD_COUNT != -1 pargs.append('--thread-count=1') #COMMENTED THIS, SO I CAN HARDCODE =1 #' + ARMORY_THREAD_COUNT) 
So, as usual, I use my script and start this with: ./StartArm.sh
(which uses command line:)
python ArmoryQt.py --ram-usage="ABCDE" --thread-count="FGHIJ" --satoshi-datadir=/BlockChain/chain20180414/blocks --datadir=/ArmoryDataDi --dbdir=/ArmoryDataDidatabases 
(this forces it to use my hard-coded values in SDM.py...)
So, this is the command which it reports that it starts with:
(WARNING) SDM.py:400 - Spawning DB with command: /BitcoinArmory/ArmoryDB --db-type="DB_FULL" --cookie --satoshi-datadir="/BlockChain/chain20180414/blocks" --datadir="/ArmoryDataDi" --dbdir="/ArmoryDataDidatabases" --ram-usage=1 --thread-count=1 
Again, this is where it gets dangerous; Armory can gobble so much memory and CPU that the windowing environment can cease up. So I ssh to the machine and keep an eye on it with:
"free -h" 

Section 7

So, on the Debian Desktop PC, I inserted the USB stick with the watch-only wallet I exported from the Pi.
Start Armory...
Import "Entire Wallet File" watch-only copy.
Wait 4 hours..
YAY!!!
After running Armory for about 30m, the memory usage dropped by 400m... wierd...
It took ~2 hours to get 40% completion.
After 3.5 hours it's almost there...
The memory went up to about 1.7Gb in use and 900Mb of Swap, but the machine remained fairly responsive throughout, apart from a few (10?) periods at the start, where it appeared to freeze for 10-30s at a time.
(That's where my ssh session came in handy - I could check the machine was still ok with a "free -h" command)
Now, I can:
Create an unsigned transaction on my Desktop,
Save the tx to USB stick,
Move to the Pi,
Sign the tx,
Move back to the Desktop,
Broadcast the signed tx.

Section 8

My initial Mistake:
This caused me to have to roll-back my Armory database, using the backup. so you should try to avoid doing this..
On the Pi, I exported only the ROOT data, which will NOT capture the watching-only part of the Private Key
It is RECOMMENDED to use the Digital Export of Entire Wallet File from the Pi when making a watch-only copy. If you just export just the "ROOT data", not the "Entire Wallet File", you'll have problems if you used an imported Private Key in the offline wallet, like I did.
Using the ROOT data text import, after it finished... my balance was zero. So,. I tried a Help->Rescan Balance (Restart Armory, takes 1minute to get back up and running) No Luck. Still zero balance.
So, I try Rescan Databases.. This will take longer. Nah.. no luck.
So, I tried again, thinking it might be to do with the fact that I imported the text "root data" stuff, instead of following the (Recommended) export of watching-wallet file.
So, I used my Armory backup, and wound back the ArmoryDataDi to the point before the install of the (zero balance) wallet. (you should not need to do this, as you will hopefully use the RECOMMENDED approach of exporting the "Entire Wallet File"!)
submitted by fartinator to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Ravencoin Open Developer Meeting - 2/15/2019

RavencoinDev (Jesse/Wolfsokta) - Last Friday at 2:02 PM
Hello everybody!

theking - Last Friday at 2:02 PM

Seems likes it’s been so long since this meeting was held. At least a month 📷

Tron - Last Friday at 2:02 PM

Hi all!!!

Tom - Last Friday at 2:02 PM

Big boss is here !(edited)

BigZim - Last Friday at 2:03 PM

Oh hi

theking - Last Friday at 2:04 PM

Hi @Tron

RavencoinDev (Jesse/Wolfsokta) - Last Friday at 2:04 PM

Topics for today: Release 2.2.2, Mobile Wallet, Restricted Assets, SLC Raven Meetup📷1

truedev - Last Friday at 2:05 PM

hello

RavencoinDev (Jesse/Wolfsokta) - Last Friday at 2:05 PM

Release 2.2.2 GO

J. | ravenland.org - Last Friday at 2:05 PM

Hey

RavencoinDev (Jesse/Wolfsokta) - Last Friday at 2:05 PM

BTW, blondfrogs won't be able to join us today. 📷

corby - Last Friday at 2:05 PM

Hi all

Chatturga - Last Friday at 2:05 PM

Blondefrogs has been working on the 2.2.2 update. He isnt here today, but he left this tidbit for the meeting:(edited)"Release 2.2.2 has a bunch of new updates. The sync speed fix that was released in 2.2.1 has been updated even more to use less memory/ram and uses less CPU. Each node used to hold all addresses that contained an asset as well as the amount in those addresses. That is now optional with the -assetindex flag. Which can be put into the raven.conf or added as a parameter when starting the wallet. Some other wallet issues were also fixed with this memory update. This is considered an mandatory update, especially if you haven't updated to 2.2.1 which resolved a potential fork bug fix. I would still suggest updating to 2.2.2 even if you are on 2.2.1."📷6

Jeroz - Last Friday at 2:07 PM

wen source?📷1

RavencoinDev (Jesse/Wolfsokta) - Last Friday at 2:07 PM

There's a PR that was just moved to Develop.When is now

Jeroz - Last Friday at 2:08 PM

great 📷

RavencoinDev (Jesse/Wolfsokta) - Last Friday at 2:08 PM

It'll be merged by the devs to master and then binaries should be posted soon

truedev - Last Friday at 2:09 PM

any idea when dividends will be functional?

RavencoinDev (Jesse/Wolfsokta) - Last Friday at 2:09 PM

A bunch of testing has been happening and is currently running on the seed-nodes.

Tron - Last Friday at 2:10 PM

No timeline for dividends, but it is the one function that doesn't need any changes to consensus. And it can be done on tier 2 with a python script. The plan is still to build in a rpc call.📷2

truedev - Last Friday at 2:11 PM

alright

SpyderDev - Last Friday at 2:12 PM

We have been focusing on sync performance and have been running many tests. I've added an image of the results of this testing. Currently we still want to work on getting the Windows QT sync times faster (at least closer to what they are using just ravend). Overall we are very happy with the speeds and hope it will help people that have struggled getting their nodes up to date.(edited)📷

Jeroz - Last Friday at 2:13 PM

Yeah that table completely puzzled me

[Master] Roshii - Last Friday at 2:13 PM

hello!📷6

Jeroz - Last Friday at 2:13 PM

Fast branch is 2.2.1? or 2.2.2? Develop branch is 2.2.0?

SpyderDev - Last Friday at 2:15 PM

Sorry, should have clarified that. I was testing while it was still under development. On the table the top is the new-sync code, the bottom is the old "assets" release. As of about 5 minutes ago all of this code is on the develop branch.

Jeroz - Last Friday at 2:15 PM

Although syncing is mostly bottlenecked by cpu speed, that 16 core windows-qt still looks off to me. I synced windows Qt using 2.2.2 in ~2h on a i5-7600K.ok

RavencoinDev (Jesse/Wolfsokta) - Last Friday at 2:17 PM

Okay, we good to move to the Mobile update?

SpyderDev - Last Friday at 2:17 PM

The Windows box is an AWS instance and there is some concern that the remote desktop could be slowing the QT UI down causing the horrible sync times. I am working on getting a local Windows 10 resource and will have updated information once that is ready (early next week).

Jeroz - Last Friday at 2:18 PM

ah that might explain. Ubuntu qt was 45 mins for me

RavencoinDev (Jesse/Wolfsokta) - Last Friday at 2:18 PM

CoolOkay, Mobile!Go!

[Master] Roshii - Last Friday at 2:18 PM

📷📷1

RavencoinDev (Jesse/Wolfsokta) - Last Friday at 2:19 PM

@[Master] Roshii has been working closely with some of the other devs to get the iOS version out the door.Android will follow closely.

Jeroz - Last Friday at 2:20 PM

is android an easy port?

J. | ravenland.org - Last Friday at 2:20 PM

Usually its the case(?), i mean easier 📷(edited)

SpyderDev - Last Friday at 2:20 PM

Just copy and paste right Roshii 📷

RavencoinDev (Jesse/Wolfsokta) - Last Friday at 2:20 PM

LOLNo, usually its a completely new development effort.For the RVN Wallets they are both written in native iOS/Android code.

[Master] Roshii - Last Friday at 2:21 PM

So the iOS and Android use the same Core SPV module written in C, and it's the most difficult part.I have already did some work when it comes to Android, and it's 70% finishedHave also to port all the changes we lately did to the iOS wallet ...

boatsandhoes - Last Friday at 2:21 PM

yeah, unfortunately its not as easy as cut and paste for ios to android

RavencoinDev (Jesse/Wolfsokta) - Last Friday at 2:21 PM

Anybody interested in installing the TestFlight version and helping us test?

boatsandhoes - Last Friday at 2:22 PM

yes

J. | ravenland.org - Last Friday at 2:22 PM

For android? sure.

BW__ - Last Friday at 2:22 PM

Android? yes.(edited)

RavencoinDev (Jesse/Wolfsokta) - Last Friday at 2:22 PM

I'll talk to Apple about adding Android support to TestFlight.Might be a while.

J. | ravenland.org - Last Friday at 2:22 PM

lol

RavencoinDev (Jesse/Wolfsokta) - Last Friday at 2:22 PM

Anybody on here using iOS?

Jeroz - Last Friday at 2:22 PM

Yeh me

RavencoinDev (Jesse/Wolfsokta) - Last Friday at 2:22 PM

besides me...

[Master] Roshii - Last Friday at 2:23 PM

Android is very close, fortunately I'll have enough coffee in Morocco to finish the wallet in two weeks.(edited)📷4📷5

RavencoinDev (Jesse/Wolfsokta) - Last Friday at 2:23 PM

https://testflight.apple.com/join/NTVQ2FfY (400 installs available)Join the RVN Wallet betaAvailable on iOS📷

theking - Last Friday at 2:23 PM

I will test iOS if needed

[Master] Roshii - Last Friday at 2:23 PM

@shiny

RavencoinDev (Jesse/Wolfsokta) - Last Friday at 2:24 PM

Some of the devs have been doing a bunch of testing on iOS but we would love others to help.Bugs can be reported on GitHubhttps://github.com/RavenProject/ravenwallet-iosGitHubRavenProject/ravenwallet-iosContribute to RavenProject/ravenwallet-ios development by creating an account on GitHub.📷

truedev - Last Friday at 2:25 PM

how confident are you that apple will allow it on the appstore

RavencoinDev (Jesse/Wolfsokta) - Last Friday at 2:25 PM

It's already in the App store.

truedev - Last Friday at 2:25 PM

ok

RavencoinDev (Jesse/Wolfsokta) - Last Friday at 2:25 PM

That wasn't easy though.

truedev - Last Friday at 2:26 PM

yah figured, a lot of coins have been completely rejected(edited)

Chatturga - Last Friday at 2:26 PM

The devs already jumped through Apples 152,315 flaming hoops to get it in there.

RavencoinDev (Jesse/Wolfsokta) - Last Friday at 2:26 PM

Yup, many meetings and phone calls.

J. | ravenland.org - Last Friday at 2:26 PM

wen rvn modular phone

Jeroz - Last Friday at 2:27 PM

Looking good📷📷7

RavencoinDev (Jesse/Wolfsokta) - Last Friday at 2:28 PM

Okay, any questions about iOS release?

jaysonb - Last Friday at 2:28 PM

seed word format changed? i seem to have to have same words. did i need to delete and install fresh?

RavencoinDev (Jesse/Wolfsokta) - Last Friday at 2:29 PM

No, it used your old ones.Always have your 12 words. especially when testing.

ravencoin maximalist 🧘🏻♂ - Last Friday at 2:30 PM

I’ve got iOS

Tron - Last Friday at 2:30 PM

If you use your 12-words, and then sync, and you're missing funds. Go here: https://medium.com/@tronblack/ravencoin-testing-ios-wallet-b713deb2c800MediumRavencoin — Testing iOS Wallet – Tron Black – MediumThank you for helping us test the Ravencoin iOS mobile wallet. Since you are in an early group of testers, you might have used the…

RavencoinDev (Jesse/Wolfsokta) - Last Friday at 2:30 PM

Sweet, install and report bugs.

Tron - Last Friday at 2:30 PM

Or just go there...

jaysonb - Last Friday at 2:30 PM

that article scared me so i moved everything off.but i'll put some back on now

ravencoin maximalist 🧘🏻♂ - Last Friday at 2:31 PM

📷

RavencoinDev (Jesse/Wolfsokta) - Last Friday at 2:31 PM

That's unfortunate. You don't need to be scared ever if you have your 12 words.

[Master] Roshii - Last Friday at 2:31 PM

android current state(edited)📷

RavencoinDev (Jesse/Wolfsokta) - Last Friday at 2:32 PM

Here's the install link one more time for those that have joined late: https://testflight.apple.com/join/NTVQ2FfYJoin the RVN Wallet betaAvailable on iOS📷Okay, Tron's topic: Restricted Tokens

Tron - Last Friday at 2:33 PM

I have an idea.(edited)📷7📷6

RavencoinDev (Jesse/Wolfsokta) - Last Friday at 2:34 PM

That several other devs have helped with. 📷

Tron - Last Friday at 2:34 PM

📷

SpyderDev - Last Friday at 2:34 PM

and lawyers

Tron - Last Friday at 2:34 PM

When the project started, ICOs were the big thing. Now it is STOsThe main difference is the legal wrapping and rules around securities.If Ravencoin has two more token types (Tags and Restricted Assets), there are lots of ways to make compliant tokens.Importantly, it doesn't affect the existing tokens at all.Tags - Tokens that can be sent only by the issuer once (with metadata).These tokens start with (hashtag)(edited)📷8

SpyderDev - Last Friday at 2:37 PM

^(octothorpe)

Tron - Last Friday at 2:37 PM

The Restricted Assets start with $, and can be frozen by the issuer. But they only move between tagged addresses.(edited)

RavencoinDev (Jesse/Wolfsokta) - Last Friday at 2:38 PM

Tags can be sent to a user's address after the issuer has done the necessary due diligence for an STO issuance.(edited)

Tron - Last Friday at 2:38 PM

The issuer determines which tags the Restricted Asset will honor.This can be used for lots of different use cases.

EEE - Last Friday at 2:38 PM

Stunning interface guys

boatsandhoes - Last Friday at 2:39 PM

will that determination be a setting in the wallet?

RavencoinDev (Jesse/Wolfsokta) - Last Friday at 2:39 PM

Restricted assets can then only be sent to addresses that are allowed and have the proper Tags.

boatsandhoes - Last Friday at 2:39 PM

interesting📷1

J. | ravenland.org - Last Friday at 2:39 PM

Did you guys get contacted by some entity* whos forcing the restricted address policy? or is this done as precautionary measure? At first glance your idea sounds good Tron.(edited)

Tron - Last Friday at 2:39 PM

Example: $UBER token only moves among addresses tagged with #KYC

RavencoinDev (Jesse/Wolfsokta) - Last Friday at 2:40 PM

So Ravenland will have to buy a bunch more spam tokens.📷4

SpyderDev - Last Friday at 2:40 PM

#ravenland.

boatsandhoes - Last Friday at 2:40 PM

so is the $ something that can be added to an existing asset?

RavencoinDev (Jesse/Wolfsokta) - Last Friday at 2:40 PM

It's not a forced thing. But adding the ability for Raven to be used in new use cases where legal requirements exist.

Tron - Last Friday at 2:40 PM

Not contacted by anyone, and not precautionary. Ravencoin Assets are just tools. This is just another tool that will help issuers of security tokens.📷9📷4

BW__ - Last Friday at 2:41 PM

Love it.

RavencoinDev (Jesse/Wolfsokta) - Last Friday at 2:41 PM

It'll be a new token type that you can create @boatsandhoes📷1

ravencoin maximalist 🧘🏻♂ - Last Friday at 2:41 PM

That sounds awesome

SpyderDev - Last Friday at 2:41 PM

I for one am very excited about this...📷4

Hans_Schmidt - Last Friday at 2:41 PM

How does the $ token owner specify the required # tags?

DeejayQQ - Last Friday at 2:41 PM

Can the same name have different token type?Sorry need time to digest

RavencoinDev (Jesse/Wolfsokta) - Last Friday at 2:42 PM

Still working out the details. Tron will be posting additional info about the idea soon.

Steelers - Last Friday at 2:42 PM

Cool

RavencoinDev (Jesse/Wolfsokta) - Last Friday at 2:42 PM

Feedback is wanted!

Tron - Last Friday at 2:42 PM

Q: Was this originally the plan for Ravencoin? A: No. This is in response to the regulatory ramp up in 2018 in some jurisdictions which requires that only known individuals or entities to operate peer-to-peer on certain tokens. For jurisdictions that allow unrestricted peer-to-peer transfer, we strongly encourage use of the original Ravencoin assets. The Restricted Assets are an adaptation to satisfy burdensome, privacy-destroying regulations, with a goal of reducing information replication which makes Ravencoin Restricted Assets a better alternative to those being promoted now.

jaysonb - Last Friday at 2:43 PM

all nodes will validate the transactions not just those interested in the transaction - i assume all will validate..

boatsandhoes - Last Friday at 2:43 PM

so essentially any name already secured in the hopes of having that functionality are worth less because they wont be able to?

theking - Last Friday at 2:44 PM

Can the restricted assets be time based in any way? For instance, in some STO regulated environment, there is a lockup for some period of time after issuance, but then after a certain period of time the restriction goes away and the securities can be traded. Is that contemplated at all?

DeejayQQ - Last Friday at 2:44 PM

If I already have Tron as my asset, there could be another Tron but under a different token type such as restricted assets?

RavencoinDev (Jesse/Wolfsokta) - Last Friday at 2:44 PM

Yes all nodes will do consensus checks.

corby - Last Friday at 2:44 PM

@boatsandhoes there's going to be a grace period where you can purchase $XXX if you own XXXon the order of months

boatsandhoes - Last Friday at 2:45 PM

📷 📷 📷 📷

RavencoinDev (Jesse/Wolfsokta) - Last Friday at 2:45 PM

Yes, you have the TRON asset and you can also have the $TRON asset.(edited)

Tron - Last Friday at 2:45 PM

Regarding the lockup....

boatsandhoes - Last Friday at 2:45 PM

how many RVN for that?

Tron - Last Friday at 2:45 PM

Rule 144 under the Securities Act of 1933 This is an important rule to be aware of in terms of privately held securities. This rule provides the most commonly used exemption for holders to sell restricted securities (Note: For context, a restricted security is a security sold in an exempt offering, except for Reg A+). The general idea is that you can publicly resell your “restricted” (privately sold) securities only when the restricted legend is removed. The solution Ravencoin Restricted Assets provides is the ability for the Iissuer to Freeze the asset ininto the holders account. The qty will be visible, and the frozen status will be visible. The meta-data for a Freeze can specify 144_Restricted. The issuer can Unfreeze to release the 144 restriction.Similar for Reg D 1-year lockup.@theking

RavencoinDev (Jesse/Wolfsokta) - Last Friday at 2:46 PM

@theking ^^

DeejayQQ - Last Friday at 2:46 PM

What is the timeline for this restricted asset to be implemented?📷1

RavencoinDev (Jesse/Wolfsokta) - Last Friday at 2:46 PM

No timelines yetStill in the ideation phase.

SpyderDev - Last Friday at 2:46 PM

Fresh off the press...

DeejayQQ - Last Friday at 2:46 PM

Ok, idea for nowGot it

RavencoinDev (Jesse/Wolfsokta) - Last Friday at 2:46 PM

Wanting input for the idea.

boatsandhoes - Last Friday at 2:47 PM

a preset for lock up settings would be nice

Jeroz - Last Friday at 2:47 PM

What about the ability to move an asset from restricted to unrestricted after grace period similar to the reissue ability? By the issuer(edited)

boatsandhoes - Last Friday at 2:47 PM

adjustable preset*

DeejayQQ - Last Friday at 2:48 PM

If this restricted assets would help underlying token listed on exchanges for trading by satisfying the legal requirements, I don’t see why not. There are only benefits📷2

boatsandhoes - Last Friday at 2:48 PM

yeah, win win

RavencoinDev (Jesse/Wolfsokta) - Last Friday at 2:48 PM

There is something similar in vote tokens.

corby - Last Friday at 2:48 PM

@Jeroz the issuer would be able to "reissue" and relax restrictions

DeejayQQ - Last Friday at 2:48 PM

Just throwing things out here. Can we just make all existing tokens crested so far restricted assets?*created

boatsandhoes - Last Friday at 2:49 PM

stupid question, is it possible to have burned rvn cost for the $ to add onto the block reward as a bonus?(edited)

RavencoinDev (Jesse/Wolfsokta) - Last Friday at 2:49 PM

No, @DeejayQQ there should be both usecases available in the platform.

corby - Last Friday at 2:49 PM

We (my dog and I) are envisioning a differentiated space where we can charge a lot more RVN to keep non-serious people out..(edited)

Tron - Last Friday at 2:49 PM

@Jeroz Yes, as long as the asset is still "reissuable", you could change the logic from (#KYC & #ACCREDITED) to just #KYC📷3

Jeroz - Last Friday at 2:49 PM

I'm just worrying about the name uniqueness if you can have #BANANA and $BANANA

BW__ - Last Friday at 2:50 PM

Is it fair to assume that tags can be standardized for specific purposes? If so, should we create something akin to an 'ERC' in git repo?

Jeroz - Last Friday at 2:50 PM

@Tron sounds cool

truedev - Last Friday at 2:50 PM

honestly, I think you should be able to buy/create an asset in a set, with all types(edited)

boatsandhoes - Last Friday at 2:50 PM

^that part

Hans_Schmidt - Last Friday at 2:51 PM

Since the #KYC tag is just locked to an address, what prevents someone from selling their address and thereby the KYC?

corby - Last Friday at 2:51 PM

The "#" types won't trade -- they're just stamps to stamp addresses as qualified-to-hold-some-stuff..

Tron - Last Friday at 2:51 PM

The tags are created by the users. The system is still jurisidiction agnostic.

RavencoinDev (Jesse/Wolfsokta) - Last Friday at 2:51 PM

@Hans_Schmidt nothing really, the same thing as selling your username password to any other existing financial app account.

corby - Last Friday at 2:51 PM

@Hans_Schmidt Real world networks, high cost of entry (for serious applications)For non-serious applications, nothing

RavencoinDev (Jesse/Wolfsokta) - Last Friday at 2:51 PM

You still have the liability associated with that account though.

Jeroz - Last Friday at 2:52 PM

@corby what about BANANA/ vs $BANANA/ ?Or do you want to make them subassets?

boatsandhoes - Last Friday at 2:52 PM

@Jeroz better safe than sorry, just swoop both

Tron - Last Friday at 2:52 PM

A country could require that #SOMECOUNTRY tag has to exist before moving $SPECIALASSET to an address. The users set the rules. #KYC was just an example because it is an industry problem at the moment.

corby - Last Friday at 2:52 PM

#BANANA, $BANANA, TRICYCLE, and BANANA can all coexist just fine I think..

theking - Last Friday at 2:53 PM

Thanks @Tron. This is great and I think something that will enable raven to become an even more widely used platform.📷4

Tron - Last Friday at 2:53 PM

That's the hope. I think it solves some real problems that the industry is trying to solve through incompatible ERC-20 experiments.📷3

RavencoinDev (Jesse/Wolfsokta) - Last Friday at 2:54 PM

/hacks📷3

boatsandhoes - Last Friday at 2:54 PM

what is the purposed cost for $ in addition to an existing asset?

corby - Last Friday at 2:54 PM

People that own #THESE I am calling "Qualifiers" -- they just stamp their mark on addresses. Issuers of $THESE need to establish trust with #THESE and #THOSE and then decide what restrictions to apply.📷1

RavencoinDev (Jesse/Wolfsokta) - Last Friday at 2:54 PM

5 mins left. Stay on this topic or switch to meetup?

Tron - Last Friday at 2:55 PM

@boatsandhoes Not determined.

Jeroz - Last Friday at 2:55 PM

yeah the idea is a nice proof of ownership / membership

DeejayQQ - Last Friday at 2:55 PM

Meetup

Chatturga - Last Friday at 2:55 PM

TL;DR - The SLC meetup is in 1 month. Go to https://www.meetup.com/Salt-Lake-City-salt-lake-city-Meetup/ to indicate if you plan on attending so that we have a somewhat accurate headcount.MeetupSalt Lake City Ravencoin (Salt Lake City, UT)Ravencoin is a blockchain and platform optimized for transferring assets, such as tokens, from one holder to another, and is built on a fork of the Bitcoin code. It is intended to prioritize security,📷

corby - Last Friday at 2:55 PM

@boatsandhoes One Million Raven

Chatturga - Last Friday at 2:55 PM

Punch and pie

J. | ravenland.org - Last Friday at 2:56 PM

Can the SLC meetup made interactive for people that cant make it there?

theking - Last Friday at 2:56 PM

What about having just one name ( you first buy the standard raven token under whatever name you like) and then the holder of the owner token is the only one to create restricted tokens ? Might be some way to ensure no name confusion.📷4

boatsandhoes - Last Friday at 2:56 PM

what about that block reward bonus concept for purchasing $. would that work?

Chatturga - Last Friday at 2:56 PM

I dont know that we have the ability to make it interactive as far as Q&A goes, but I'll look into it. We should have it live streaming. @J. | ravenland.org(edited)📷2

BW__ - Last Friday at 2:56 PM

@Tron Is there same kind of logic layer to restricted assets?(edited)

Tron - Last Friday at 2:57 PM

@theking I like that idea.

Jeroz - Last Friday at 2:57 PM

Quick question that is offtopic but I think deserves an answer because it was asked a couple of times earlier this week: Will unique assets get a reissuable function? To change IPFS.(edited)📷2

Tron - Last Friday at 2:57 PM

@BW__ Yes. Simple and, or, not and parenthesis - limited in length.(edited)

boatsandhoes - Last Friday at 2:57 PM

@theking thats a good idea

RavencoinDev (Jesse/Wolfsokta) - Last Friday at 2:58 PM

@Jeroz There is not a way to do that currently.

BW__ - Last Friday at 2:58 PM

@Tron That makes sense. Thank you.

RavencoinDev (Jesse/Wolfsokta) - Last Friday at 2:58 PM

Just make sure your changes to the information have the same hash as the previous data and your golden. 📷📷1

Jeroz - Last Friday at 2:59 PM

Any plans on changing that, perhaps when introducing new types of assets?

boatsandhoes - Last Friday at 2:59 PM

i like that it cant be changed

corby - Last Friday at 3:00 PM

Thanks everyone!

theking - Last Friday at 3:00 PM

@Tron there was some info floating around about a 2nd later KYC solution ( from your recent podcast w Crypto Koala). Is that a separate solution someone is working on or part of this new concept?📷1

Tron - Last Friday at 3:01 PM

Starting with the introduction of messaging, every transaction can have an IPFS hash. Can be used as an public invoice, details about the transaction, etc.@theking The same new concept.

[Master] Roshii - Last Friday at 3:02 PM

Ok, we're done.

Steelers - Last Friday at 3:02 PM

How would Raven handle for instance a stock split?

BW__ - Last Friday at 3:02 PM

Are there sync concerns if a restricted asset logic layer is added?

Tron - Last Friday at 3:02 PM

@theking The KYC provider would store the KYC info, and send the Tag to an address with meta data that specifies that they're holding the KYC data. The KYC data would not be public, but could be audited.

RavencoinDev (Jesse/Wolfsokta) - Last Friday at 3:02 PM

That way you could update information about the original unique asset with each transaction.@Steelers Just a simple re-issue of the asset

Tron - Last Friday at 3:03 PM

@bw_ The logic layer is only a small db that stores the meta-data about the Restricted Asset, and enforces the restriction in the consensus rules. Rule returns true/false.(edited)

RavencoinDev (Jesse/Wolfsokta) - Last Friday at 3:03 PM

Thanks everybody! I have to run.

Jeroz - Last Friday at 3:04 PM

I'm looking forward to the discussions to let this take shape. Thanks all! 📷📷4

Tron - Last Friday at 3:05 PM

@BW__ It would work very similarly to the way the units works now. Each asset has number of units and any transaction that makes it too granular (more satoshis) will fail in consensus -- even if it gets past the RPC checks.Signing off. Thanks all!!!📷9📷4📷9
submitted by Chatturga to Ravencoin [link] [comments]

Sono tornato e voglio sapere tutto quello che è successo in mia assenza!

Buongiorno eccomi qui. Per anni ho avuto la fissa della tecnologia. Appena mi alzavo la mattina la prima cosa che facevo era...la pipì. Ma poi correvo a leggere tutte le news che ruotavano intorno al mondo tecnologico e quindi: slashdot, techchrunch, punto-informatico ecc...
Poi nel 2011 ho perso completamente interesse, mi sembrava che il mondo con le app si fosse appiattito e che la tecnologia intorno al mondo IT fosse meno interessante, ma forse ero solo io che avevo bisogno di staccare la spina. Ora però voglio tornare, voglio di nuovo sapere tutto ciò che sta accadendo e che è accaduto negli anni passati.
Ho voglia però di essere aggiornato. Quali sono state secondo voi le tecnologie software/hardware, i servizi e le acquisizioni più importanti degli ultimi sei anni?
Aggiornerò questo post creando una timeline man mano che ognuno di voi fornirà informazioni attraverso i commenti.
TIMELINE
submitted by ildormiglione to ItalyInformatica [link] [comments]

Interested in contributing to the BTC network? Here is the steps to get a full node up and running in Linux.

These instructions will work both on a VPS cloud server or a personal computer. You may find cheap VPS somewhere online for rent.
What Is A Full Node?
A full node is a program that fully validates transactions and blocks. Almost all full nodes also help the network by accepting transactions and blocks from other full nodes, validating those transactions and blocks, and then relaying them to further full nodes.
Most full nodes also serve lightweight clients by allowing them to transmit their transactions to the network and by notifying them when a transaction affects their wallet. If not enough nodes perform this function, clients won’t be able to connect through the peer-to-peer network—they’ll have to use centralized services instead.
Many people and organizations volunteer to run full nodes using spare computing and bandwidth resources—but more volunteers are needed to allow Bitcoin to continue to grow. This document describes how you can help and what helping will cost you.
Costs And Warnings
Running a Bitcoin full node comes with certain costs and can expose you to certain risks. This section will explain those costs and risks so you can decide whether you’re able to help the network.
Special Cases
Miners, businesses, and privacy-conscious users rely on particular behavior from the full nodes they use, so they will often run their own full nodes and take special safety precautions. This document does not cover those precautions—it only describes running a full node to help support the Bitcoin network in general.
Please consult an expert if you need help setting up your full node correctly to handle high-value and privacy-sensitive tasks.
Secure Your Wallet
It’s possible and safe to run a full node to support the network and use its wallet to store your bitcoins, but you must take the same precautions you would when using any Bitcoin wallet. Please see the securing your wallet page for more information.
Minimum Requirements
Bitcoin Core full nodes have certain requirements. If you try running a node on weak hardware, it may work—but you’ll likely spend more time dealing with issues. If you can meet the following requirements, you’ll have an easy-to-use node.
Note: many operating systems today (Windows, Mac, and Linux) enter a low-power mode after the screensaver activates, slowing or halting network traffic. This is often the default setting on laptops and on all Mac OS X laptops and desktops. Check your screensaver settings and disable automatic “sleep” or “suspend” options to ensure you support the network whenever your computer is running.
Possible Problems
Legal: Bitcoin use is prohibited or restricted in some areas.
Bandwidth limits: Some Internet plans will charge an additional amount for any excess upload bandwidth used that isn’t included in the plan. Worse, some providers may terminate your connection without warning because of overuse. We advise that you check whether your Internet connection is subjected to such limitations and monitor your bandwidth use so that you can stop Bitcoin Core before you reach your upload limit.
Anti-virus: Several people have placed parts of known computer viruses in the Bitcoin block chain. This block chain data can’t infect your computer, but some anti-virus programs quarantine the data anyway, making it more difficult to run a full node. This problem mostly affects computers running Windows.
Attack target: People who want to disrupt the Bitcoin network may attack full nodes in ways that will affect other things you do with your computer, such as an attack that limits your available download bandwidth or an attack that prevents you from using your full node’s wallet for sending transactions.
Linux Instructions
The following instructions describe installing Bitcoin Core on Linux systems.
Ubuntu 14.10 Instructions for Bitcoin Core 0.10.0.
If you use Ubuntu Desktop, click the Ubuntu swirl icon to start the Dash and type “term” into the input box. Choose any one of the terminals listed:
Alternatively, access a console or terminal emulator using another method, such as SSH on Ubuntu Server or a terminal launcher in an alternative desktop environment.
Type the following line to add the Bitcoin Personal Package Archive (PPA) to your system:
sudo apt-add-repository ppa:bitcoin/bitcoin
You will be prompted for your user password. Provide it to continue. Afterwards, the following text will be displayed:
Stable Channel of bitcoin-qt and bitcoind for Ubuntu, and their dependencies
More info: https://launchpad.net/~bitcoin/+archive/ubuntu/bitcoin
Press [ENTER] to continue or ctrl-c to cancel adding it
Press enter to continue. The following text (with some variations) will be displayed and you will be returned to the command line prompt:
gpg: keyring /tmp/tmpixuqu73x/secring.gpg' created gpg: keyring/tmp/tmpixuqu73x/pubring.gpg' created gpg: requesting key 8842CE5E from hkp server > > > >keyserver.ubuntu.com gpg: /tmp/tmpixuqu73x/trustdb.gpg: trustdb created gpg: key 8842CE5E: public key "Launchpad PPA for Bitcoin" imported gpg: no ultimately trusted keys found gpg: Total number processed: 1 pg: imported: 1 (RSA: 1) OK
Type the following line to get the most recent list of packages:
sudo apt-get update
A large number of lines will be displayed as different update files are downloaded. This step may take several minutes on a slow Internet connection.
To continue, choose one of the following options
sudo apt-get install bitcoin-qt
sudo apt-get install bitcoind
sudo apt-get install bitcoin-qt bitcoind
After choosing what packages to install, you will be asked whether you want to proceed. Press enter to continue.
If you’re logged in as an administrative user with sudo access, you may log out. The steps in this section should be performed as the user you want to run Bitcoin Core. (If you’re an expert administrator, you can make this a locked account used only by Bitcoin Core.)
Before using the Bitcoin Core daemon, bitcoind, you need to create its configuration file with a user name and password. First create the .bitcoin directory, create (touch) the file, and set the file’s permissions so that only your user account can read it. From the terminal, type:
mkdir ~/.bitcoin touch ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf chmod 600 ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf
Then you can run the command bitcoind. It will print output similar to this:
bitcoind Error: To use the "-server" option, you must set a rpcpassword in the configuration file: /home/bitcoinorg/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf It is recommended you use the following random password: rpcuser=bitcoinrpc rpcpassword=XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX (you do not need to remember this password)
The username and password MUST NOT be the same.
If the file does not exist, create it with owner-readable-only file permissions. It is also recommended to set alertnotify so you are notified of problems; for example: alertnotify=echo %s | mail -s "Bitcoin Alert" [email protected] The “rpcpassword” displayed will be unique for your system. You can copy the rpcuser and rpcpassword lines into your configuration file using the following commands. Note that in most Ubuntu terminals, you need to press Ctrl-Shift-C to copy and Ctrl-Shift-V to paste because Ctrl-C and Ctrl-V have different meanings in a Unix-style terminal.
echo rpcuser=bitcoinrpc >> ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf echo rpcpassword=XXXXXX >> ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf (Warning: Don’t use XXXXXX as your RPC password. Copy the rpcpassword displayed by bitcoind for your system.)
Now you can start Bitcoin Core daemon for real. Type the following command:
bitcoind -daemon
It will print a message that Bitcoin Core is starting. To interact with Bitcoin Core daemon, you will use the command bitcoin-cli (Bitcoin command line interface). Note: it may take up to several minutes for Bitcoin Core to start, during which it will display the following message whenever you use bitcoin-cli:
error: {"code":-28,"message":"Verifying blocks..."}
After it starts, you may find the following commands useful for basic interaction with your node:
to safely stop your node, run the following command:
bitcoin-cli stop
A complete list of commands is available in the Bitcoin.org developer reference.
When Bitcoin Core daemon first starts, it will begin to download the block chain. This step will take at least several hours, and it may take a day or more on a slow Internet connection or with a slow computer. During the download, Bitcoin Core will use a significant part of your connection bandwidth. You can stop Bitcoin Core at any time using the stop command; it will resume from the point where it stopped the next time you start it.
Optional: Start Your Node At Boot
Starting your node automatically each time your computer boots makes it easy for you to contribute to the network. The easiest way to do this is to start Bitcoin Core daemon from your crontab. To edit your crontab, run the following command:
crontab -e
@reboot bitcoind -daemon Save the file and exit; the updated crontab file will be installed for you. Now Bitcoin Core daemon will be automatically started each time your reboot your computer.
If you’re an Ubuntu expert and want to use an init script instead, see this Upstart script.
You have now completed installing Bitcoin Core. If you have any questions, please ask in one of Bitcoin’s many communities, such as Bitcoin StackExchange, BitcoinTalk technical support, or the #bitcoin IRC chatroom on Freenode.
To support the Bitcoin network, you also need to allow incoming connections. Please read the Network Configuration section for details.
Network Configuration
If you want to support the Bitcoin network, you must allow inbound connections.
When Bitcoin Core starts, it establishes 8 outbound connections to other full nodes so it can download the latest blocks and transactions. If you just want to use your full node as a wallet, you don’t need more than these 8 connections—but if you want to support lightweight clients and other full nodes on the network, you must allow inbound connections.
Servers connected directly to the Internet usually don’t require any special configuration. You can use the testing instructions below to confirm your server-based node accepts inbound connections.
Home connections are usually filtered by a router or modem. Bitcoin Core will request your router automatically configure itself to allow inbound connections to Bitcoin’s port, port 8333. Unfortunately many routers don’t allow automatic configuration, so you must manually configure your router. You may also need to configure your firewall to allow inbound connections to port 8333. Please see the following subsections for details.
Testing Connections
The BitNodes project provides an online tool to let you test whether your node accepts inbound connections. To use it, start Bitcoin Core (either the GUI or the daemon), wait 10 minutes, and then visit the GetAddr page (https://getaddr.bitnodes.io/). The tool will attempt to guess your IP address—if the address is wrong (or blank), you will need to enter your address manually.
For more instruction and reviews based off BTC please follow my subreddit /BTC_Reviews
all material from this post was found here --> https://bitcoin.org/en/full-node
submitted by Mattjhagen to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Lore v2 QT on Raspberry Pi

Hello,
 
To follow up to mindphuk's excellent piece on building the headless client on Raspberry Pi (https://www.reddit.com/blackcoin/comments/6gkjrw/wip_blackpi_a_stake_device_based_on_raspberry/), I thought if anyone was interested I'd show you how to get the full QT version running on the Pi on the Jessie with Pixel desktop. This works and has been soak tested for several days now on a standard Raspberry Pi 3. I have since added some coins and it stakes a handful of times a day.
 
Running staking Lore clients paves the way for some of the future use cases of BLK utilising the Bitcoin 0.12 (and newer) core tech, including colored coins. So I'm going to leave this one going indefinitely to kickstart the number of Lore clients staking. It's certainly not mandatory but it will be good in the longer term to have a nice distribution of Lore staking clients.
 
The cross-compile which lets you create binaries for multiple platforms didn't work for the QT version on the Pi, so there is more to do than just running the binary unfortunately, as below. There are folks working on some much cleaner solutions than this for the Pi, with a custom front end, and where you won't have to do any mucking about. That is coming soon. In the meantime, if you enjoy a fiddle with such things, here's how to get this QT client working on your Pi.
 
These instructions assume you are starting from scratch with a completely blank OS.
 
Download Jessie with Pixel from: http://downloads.raspberrypi.org/raspbian/images/raspbian-2017-07-05/2017-07-05-raspbian-jessie.zip
 
Note they have since (August 2017) released a version called 'Stretch' which does not work with this guide. I'll see if I can come up with something new for that at some point and link to it here when I have. In the meantime the guide should work with the Jessie image above.
 
Unzip the file and extract the .img file to burn it onto Fresh SD card to boot from (to be safe, use 16GB or larger), using a tool like win32diskimager or Etcher.
 
Assuming you have keyboard/mouse and monitor plugged into your pi, boot it up and the Jessie Desktop will show.
 
Before we do anything else, you should increase the default swap size on the pi, as compiling certain libraries can exhaust the RAM and get stuck otherwise. To do this, launch a Terminal window and type:
 
sudo nano /etc/dphys-swapfile 
 
and Change the CONF_SWAPSIZE from 100 to:
 
CONF_SWAPSIZE=1024 
 
Exit nano with control + x to write out the file.
 
Then, run the following to restart the swapfile manager:
 
sudo /etc/init.d/dphys-swapfile stop sudo /etc/init.d/dphys-swapfile start 
 
Now, launch the browser and download the Lore 2.12 binaries for ARM here: https://mega.nz/#!k2InxZhb!iaLhUPreA7LZqZ-Az-0StRBUshSJ82XjldPsvhGBBH4 (Version with fee fix from 6 September 2017)
 
(If you prefer to compile it yourself instead, it is possible by following the instructions in the original article by Mindphuk just taking into account this is the newer version of the Lore client than when that was written (https://github.com/janko33bd/bitcoin/releases) and the versions of Boost and the Berkeley DB need to be the same as below.)
 
Double click the zip and extract the Lore binary files. Yes, at the moment they are all called 'bitcoin', not 'blackcoin' or 'Lore' - this is because the code derives from a recent bitcoin core implementation so this has not yet been updated. You can place these wherever you like.
 
In the Terminal window, change directory to where you put the binaries, e.g.:
 
cd Downloads/lore-raspberrypi-armv7-jessie-pixel chmod +x * 
 
That marks the binaries as executable.
 
Now, we need the Boost libraries installed for any of the Lore binaries to work. The project was done with Boost 1.62.0. Unfortunately the Jessie repository only goes up to 1.55, so we need to download and build 1.62 manually on the device.
wget https://sourceforge.net/projects/boost/files/boost/1.62.0/boost_1_62_0.tar.gz/download tar -xvzf download cd boost_1_62_0 sudo ./bootstrap.sh sudo ./b2 install 
 
(This will take almost 2 hours. Have a nice cup of tea and a sit down.)
 
When I came to run the binaries, I found they couldn't find Boost. Running this command fixes that:
sudo ldconfig 
 
Now we are going to install the packages which aren't already included in the default OS installation which the binaries need in order to run:
sudo apt-get install qrencode libprotobuf-dev libevent-pthreads-2.0-5 
 
Now we need to install the Berkeley Database version 6.2.23. This is the version Lore v2 uses. Bitcoin still uses 4.8 which is 10 years old! This doesn't take too long.
wget http://download.oracle.com/berkeley-db/db-6.2.23.tar.gz tar -xvzf db-6.2.23.tar.gz cd db-6.2.23/build_unix ../dist/configure --prefix=/usr --enable-compat185 --enable-dbm --disable-static --enable-cxx 
 
I find this next section of the Berkeley instructions worked better just switching to root, which can be fudged by running sudo su before the rest:
sudo su make make docdir=/usshare/doc/db-6.2.23 install chown -v -R root:root /usbin/db_* /usinclude/db{,_185,_cxx}.h /uslib/libdb*.{so,la} /usshare/doc/db-6.2.23 
 
Now we're going to go up a couple of directories to where the binaries were:
cd ../.. 
 
Then run the client!
./bitcoin-qt 
 
And there you have it. Should hopefully end up looking a bit like this: http://imgur.com/a/eEHGa
 
Using the Bootstrap can save a while syncing. Download it at: https://www.reddit.com/blackcoin/comments/6b3imq/blackcoin_bootstrapdat_up_to_block_1631800
 
Place the bootstrap.dat file into the ~/.lore directory.
 
Run ./bitcoin-qt again, it will say 'Importing Blocks' rather than 'Synchronising with Network'. My pi sync'ed fully in about 5-6 hours.
 
If you want peace of mind that Lore will always start on bootup into the Jessie w/Pixel desktop (i.e. after a power cycle), then you need to create a .desktop file in the following place.
sudo nano ~/.config/autostart/Lore.desktop 
 
And in it, enter the following (tailoring the Exec line below to the whereabouts of your bitcoin-qt file):
[Desktop Entry] Name=Blackcoin Lore Comment=Mining without the waste Exec=/home/pi/Downloads/lore-raspberrypi-armv7-jessie-pixel/bitcoin-qt Type=Application Encoding=UTF-8 Terminal=false Categories=None; 
 
Power usage and payback time
 
After a good while leaving it going by itself, the CPU load averages got down to almost zero, all of the time. Idling, the Pi uses a bit less than 3 watts. This means it would take two weeks to use one 1Kw/h of electricity.
 
If you pay e.g. 12.5 cents a unit, that's what you'd expect this to cost to run in a fortnight. That's around $0.25 a month or $3 a year. Green and cheap and helping to secure the BLK network. I paid for the year's worth of electricity in 2 days staking with 25k BLK. Makes mining look silly, huh? ;)
 
Securing your Pi
 
With staking, your wallet needs to be unlocked and as such, the keys to your wallet are on the device. In a clean and newly installed environment as described above, and if you don't allow others to use your device and there is no other software or nasties running on it, there is no real cause for concern. However, there are some basic security precautions you can take.
 
Firstly, if you have enabled SSH and are playing with your pi across your LAN (or worse, the Internet), you should immediately change the password for the default 'pi' user (which is preconfigured to be 'raspberry'). Simply log in as normal, then type:
 
passwd 
 
You'll be prompted to enter the old and the new passwords.
 
Security by default
 
Your Pi is likely, by default, to not be exposed to incoming connections from the outside world because your router is likely generating a private address range for your LAN (192.168.x.x or 10.0.x.x or 172.x.x.x) which means all incoming connections are effectively blocked at the router anyway unless you set up a 'port forward' record to allow packets arriving on certain ports to be forwarded to a specific internal IP address.
 
As for accessing your Pi across the internet, if you have set up a port forward, this likely has security ramifications. Even basic old fashioned protocols have proven in recent times to have uncaught flaws, so it's always advisable to lock down your device as much as possible, and even if you only plan to access the Pi over your LAN, install a firewall to configure this. I used one called ufw, because it's literally an uncomplicated firewall.
 
sudo apt-get install ufw sudo ufw allow from 192.168.0.0/16 to any port 22 sudo ufw --force enable 
 
This allows just port 22 (SSH) to be open on the Pi to any device on my LAN's subnet (192.168.0.x). You can change the above to a single IP address if paranoid, or add several lines, if you want to lock it down to your LAN and a specific external static IP address (e.g. a VPN service you use). To find out what subnet your router uses, just type:
 
ifconfig 
 
and you'll see on the interface you are using (either hard wired or wifi) the 192.168 or 10. or 172. prefix. Change the above rule so it matches the first two octets correctly (e.g. 10.0.0.0/16 if you're on a 10.0. address).
 
You may already use VNC to access your Pi's desktop across your LAN, this uses port 5900. Add a line like above to lock it down to an internal address. It's not a good idea to expose this port to the wider world because those connections are not encrypted and potentially could be subjected to a MITM attack.
 
You can query the status of the firewall like this:
ufw status 
 
And of course, try connecting remotely once you change the rules to see what works. You should consult the official documentation for further options: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/UFW
 
Back up & Recovery
 
There are again many ways to tackle this so I'll just speak about my basic precautions in this regard. Don't take it as a be-all-and-end-all!
 
The wallet.dat file is the key file (literally) containing all the private/public keys and transactions. This can be found in:
 
~/.lore 
 
You can navigate there using Jessie w/Pixel's own file manager or in a terminal window (cd ~/.lore). You can copy this file or, if you'd rather keep a plain text file of all your public and private keys, use the 'dumpwallet' command in the console. In Lore, go to Help > Debug Window > Console and type 'dumpwallet myfilename' where myfilename is the file you want it to spit out with all your keys in it. This file will end up in the same place you launch bitcoin-qt from.
 
The instructions earlier on, when running Lore for the first time intentionally left out encrypting your wallet.dat file because in order for the wallet to stake upon startup, it needs to have a decrypted key already. This isn't perfect, but after a power cycle, it would never stake unless you left it decrypted. So the best practice here is as soon as the wallet.dat file has left your device, i.e. you copy it to a USB stick for example, put it in an encrypted folder or drive (or both).
 
In Windows, one way is to use Bitlocker drive encryption for the entire drive. You should follow the instructions here to encrypt your flash drive before your wallet.dat is on there, and don't forget the password!!
http://infosec.nmsu.edu/instructions-guides/how-to-enable-bitlocker-to-go-for-external-hard-drives-and-usb-flash-drives/
 
On the Mac, I use a software package called Concealer to encrypt files I store on the Mac itself: http://www.belightsoft.com/products/conceale   There are almost certainly free packages with similar functionality, I have just used that one for years.
 
Either way, if you want to just make sure your USB drive is encrypted, you can do so in one-click in Finder before you put the sensitive files on it: http://lifehacker.com/encrypt-a-usb-stick-in-finder-with-a-click-1594798016
 
Note that these disk encryption methods may mean having to access the USB stick on a PC or Mac in order to retrieve the files in the event of a disaster. Be aware this may mean exposing them to more security issues if your computer is in any way compromised or someone nefarious has access to your computer. There are more 'manual' ways of backing up and recovering, such as literally writing down private/public key pairs which this guide doesn't go into, but may suit you better if paranoid about your setup.
 
Recovery
 
The wallet.dat file has everything in it you need to recover your wallet, or if you used 'dumpwallet', the file you saved out has all the keys.
 
Wallet.dat method: Install Lore as normal then replace any auto-generated wallet.dat in ~/.lore directory with your backup. If a lot of time has elapsed and many transactions have occurred since your backup, launch lore with:
./bitcoin-qt -rescan 
 
And if that doesn't do the job, do a full reindex of the blockchain:
 
./bitcoin-qt -reindex 
 
If you used the dumpwallet command, install Lore then place the file containing all the keys that you saved out in the same directory as bitcoin-qt. In Lore, go to Help > Debug Window > Console and type 'importwallet myfilename' where myfilename is that file containing all the keys. The wallet should automatically rescan for transactions at that point and you should be good to go.
 
There are a million ways to do effective security and disaster recovery, but I hope this shows you a couple of basic precautionary ways. There are discussions about better ways to stake without compromising too much security which are happening all the time and developments in this regard will happen in time.
 
In the meantime, feel free to comment with your best practices.
 
submitted by patcrypt to blackcoin [link] [comments]

It's about time Bitcoin was associated to biomedical research

Introducing Bitsolve, no it's not a alt coin. This is, however, a work in progress, and is constructed to provide a direction, if not, a potential architecture to how we can use Bitcoin technology to accomplish goals that directly contribute to the betterment and understanding of human health. Edits, correction, improvements are the goals for this post. Be explicit.
BitSolve: An open source incentivized decentralized free-market peer-2- peer architecture that harnesses the computational power of the world in order to solve complex and/or large-scale biological problems while providing real-time monetary compensation in bitcoin to anyone with a CPU.
The computational resources required to solve biological problems are hard to over-estimate. Since the 1990s, bioinformatics and computational biology have emerged as crucial elements in solving problems in virtually every field of biology. Such needs are predicted to increase as dataset generation explodes due to technologies such as next-generation sequencing, high-throughput proteomics, metabolomics and epigenomics. Furthermore, scientists are beginning to appreciate holistic approaches in modeling biological systems such as whole cell, and organ level dynamics via integrating several datasets from multiple sub-cellular technologies that utilize computationally intensive algorithms.
There is an enormous amount of computation power that is currently inaccessible to the life scientist. This power is available not in laboratories or institutions, but rather in personal computers in homes and hands (smart phones, tablets) that belong to people all around the world. These computers are often idle or are underperforming because of computationally trivial activities such as web browsing, checking e-mail or typing into a word processor. There would be an exponential boost in computation power available to life scientists if such CPU power could be harnessed for solving biological problems. Furthermore, as each individual would upgrade their hardware for their own private use, this would free scientists from this task, freeing them to focus on hypothesis testing and the scientific questions at hand.
BitSolve would enable any scientist in any part of the world to ask sophisticated questions from an ever more increasing dataset without ever having to worry about updating hardware or statistical software. Distributed computational architectures are not entirely novel, not even for biological analysis. However, previous systems have had one major flaw: they have relied on the voluntary donation of computation resources by individuals at home. As individuals have had zero monetary incentive to lend their power, many of them have been reluctant to do so.
We propose a system called BitSolve that provides a direct monetary incentive to anyone in the world with a computational unit and an internet connection, where individuals get paid directly and immediately for devoting their computer's CPU time over the internet. Such a system could have additional benefits as well. For instance, it would allow individuals and scientists to bid for a CPU poweprice that would drive down the price of computation power in a free market environment. This would encourage third world citizens to participate in the network due to their relatively lower electricity costs. BitSolve will thus enable truly global participation on an even competitive plane, where the mere ownership of a device with a computational unit will simultaneously be a revenue source for the owner, and a cheap and ample computational source for researchers.
How does it work?
The architecture would be a piece of software that anyone could download. The software would be coded in a cross-platform programming language such as C++, Java, QT etc, so that it could be run on most desktops, laptops, smart phones, and tablets. Once the software is run, the user's computational unit becomes part of a network of computers running the same software. Anyone running the software can choose to become a “CPU giver” or a “CPU requester.” It is important to note that, nowhere during the process is there a need for entering any personal information, making this a relatively friction free adoption technology.
A CPU giver: A CPU giver is someone whom has downloaded the software and agrees on renting out their CPU for a certain time on an agreed upon price. A “CPU giver” would ask for a certain price for example x BTC/min or at a market price. The software would determine the market price of the “CPU giver” after running a test on the CPU to estimate the available resources and then strike a price based on the real-time market exchange. The “CPU giver” could then leave the computational unit, which, if selected in the market, would conduct parts of an analysis, broadcast the completion of analysis, and after receiving confirmation from the network of true completion, would receive funds from the CPU requester that would directly be transferred to the CPU giver's wallet. All of this would happen automatically and without the need for a third party. A CPU requester: A CPU requester is someone who is seeking computational power in the network and has funds in bitcoin allotted for the required analysis. The CPU requester would have a statistical algorithm to be conducted with a certain dataset. After choosing the dataset and copying the R script to the software, the CPU requester then chooses the price that they are willing to pay for the analysis. “CPU givers” that have fast CPUs would ask for a high price, and those with slower CPUs would ask for a lower one. In other words, if CPU requesters wants the analysis conducted in a small amount of time, they would pay a higher price, whereas, they would bid for a lower price if the analysis can be run in a longer period of time. The software would also include a real time CPU/price exchange market that would serve as a reference for bidding. Once the price is chosen, the information is broadcasted across the network and CPU givers are chosen automatically (corresponding with asking prices). The request is then processed and the parts of the data are analyzed securely. Once the analysis is complete, the network using existing Bitcoin proof-of-work algorithm verifies the completion, and the payment of bitcoin is made from the CPU requester to the CPU giver. The results are then returned to the requester and operation is complete.
Can you describe the software?
The software would have four main components 1. R Statistical package (http://www.r-project.org/): R is the open source, statistical engine that would be the interface for the analyst to program their analysis. R is also the most widely used and rapidly evolving statistical platform used by life scientists due in part to its open source and thus free nature. 2. MutliThreader:Java based open source interpreter that converts the R program into smaller portions that can be sent to separate computers in the network to conduct the analysis and also handles the peer-2-peer communication. 3. A Bitcoin (http://bitcoin.org/en/) (open-source) client that would handle the real-time financial transactions. 4. Java based open source exchange system and handles the bidding for CPU by price for the CPU requester and the bidding of CPU by price for the CPU giver. 5. Java based open source allocation for integrating other types of computation not applicable to R for future expansion. * Note the specific software requirements are not mandatory but use the framework of what is possible in 2013. We also acknowledge that some parts of the systems can be implemented with software such as mastercoin (open-source) and colored coins(open-source). The two essential parts would be a bitcoin client and R statistical software. Why Peer-2-peer and not distributed? Is there a difference? Past architectures that have sought to harness the computational power of personal computers have been distributed from one to many, as in one laboratory aims to distribute their software to many individuals to conduct their analysis exclusively and specifically.(Pande Lab, Stanford). A peer-2- peer united open source system, would entail that any one that uses the free software can act as a CPU “giver” as well as a CPU “requester”. More importantly, because the entire process does not require personal information, the bidding process for CPU time would be free of considerations regarding project scope or vocational seniority. Due to this “freedom,” a graduate student in Boston, could program his personalized analysis of black hole dynamics to run on super computers in Stanford by bidding a higher price, while on the same market a precocious 15 year old in Korea, could bid a lower price to have his father's farm optimization algorithm run on slower and thus cheaper smart phones in India. The diversity in juxtapositions is intentional and should highlight that although this paper discusses the benefits with the life scientist in mind, the implementation does not limit, and to a certain degree, demands context and identity free analysis. This provision is primarily meant to ensure swift and diverse advancement of the software and to have enough CPU 'requesters' to implicate free market dynamics that will lower the prices and thus ensure highest value for CPU speed per houprice. It may be useful to note this will be the first time CPU speed/price will self stabilize on a global level to an optimal value that will be devoid of price inflation due to taxes associated with local governments and geographical distance to the CPU manufacturer etc. Peer-2-peer is extremely robust. Since previous distributed systems have had one governing computational node that does all its CPU requesting, they have been vulnerable to attacks and other security risks. Since this system is peer-2-peer, anonymous, and decentralized, there would never be a target to attack in the first place, ensuring security and robustness. Taking the system down would only be attainable by compromising the Internet in its entirety. Can you explain how the monetary compensation works? Bitcoin is a revolutionary technology. It is a completely decentralized, peer- 2-peer, open source, Internet currency/asset. Bitcoin uses peer-to-peer technology to operate with no central authority or banks. The network collectively carries out the managing of transactions and the issuing of bitcoins. Bitcoin's unique and groundbreaking properties make new applications for financial transactions that were virtually non-existent with legacy technologies now possible. This project would not be possible if monetary compensation of CPU givers entailed entering personal data, bank information etc. This would carry significant friction for scaling and in some countries wouldn't be possible even in theory because of high numbers of unbanked individuals and archaic financial systems. The only friction in this model is where anyone requesting a CPU would first need to exchange their local currency into bitcoin, which can be done in several online bitcoin exchanges that accept a plethora of local currencies. Since the ratio of CPU givers to CPU requesters is expected to be very high, this is unlikely to cause major problems in scaling now or in the future. CPU givers would only be required to download the software and run it in order to start accepting monetary compensation. It is also useful to note that the bitcoin network itself may be used as a source for computational power, although this would carry with it limited diversity in the type of computation possible.
submitted by bitcoinsSG to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Interested in contributing to the BTC community? Here is a exhaustive manual to get you up and running. (Only takes about 20-30 minutes if you are fluent in command prompt on linux).

These instructions will work both on a VPS cloud server or a personal computer. You may find cheap VPS somewhere online for rent.
What Is A Full Node?
A full node is a program that fully validates transactions and blocks. Almost all full nodes also help the network by accepting transactions and blocks from other full nodes, validating those transactions and blocks, and then relaying them to further full nodes.
Most full nodes also serve lightweight clients by allowing them to transmit their transactions to the network and by notifying them when a transaction affects their wallet. If not enough nodes perform this function, clients won’t be able to connect through the peer-to-peer network—they’ll have to use centralized services instead.
Many people and organizations volunteer to run full nodes using spare computing and bandwidth resources—but more volunteers are needed to allow Bitcoin to continue to grow. This document describes how you can help and what helping will cost you.
Costs And Warnings
Running a Bitcoin full node comes with certain costs and can expose you to certain risks. This section will explain those costs and risks so you can decide whether you’re able to help the network.
Special Cases
Miners, businesses, and privacy-conscious users rely on particular behavior from the full nodes they use, so they will often run their own full nodes and take special safety precautions. This document does not cover those precautions—it only describes running a full node to help support the Bitcoin network in general.
Please consult an expert if you need help setting up your full node correctly to handle high-value and privacy-sensitive tasks.
Secure Your Wallet
It’s possible and safe to run a full node to support the network and use its wallet to store your bitcoins, but you must take the same precautions you would when using any Bitcoin wallet. Please see the securing your wallet page for more information.
Minimum Requirements
Bitcoin Core full nodes have certain requirements. If you try running a node on weak hardware, it may work—but you’ll likely spend more time dealing with issues. If you can meet the following requirements, you’ll have an easy-to-use node.
Note: many operating systems today (Windows, Mac, and Linux) enter a low-power mode after the screensaver activates, slowing or halting network traffic. This is often the default setting on laptops and on all Mac OS X laptops and desktops. Check your screensaver settings and disable automatic “sleep” or “suspend” options to ensure you support the network whenever your computer is running.
Possible Problems
Legal: Bitcoin use is prohibited or restricted in some areas.
Bandwidth limits: Some Internet plans will charge an additional amount for any excess upload bandwidth used that isn’t included in the plan. Worse, some providers may terminate your connection without warning because of overuse. We advise that you check whether your Internet connection is subjected to such limitations and monitor your bandwidth use so that you can stop Bitcoin Core before you reach your upload limit.
Anti-virus: Several people have placed parts of known computer viruses in the Bitcoin block chain. This block chain data can’t infect your computer, but some anti-virus programs quarantine the data anyway, making it more difficult to run a full node. This problem mostly affects computers running Windows.
Attack target: People who want to disrupt the Bitcoin network may attack full nodes in ways that will affect other things you do with your computer, such as an attack that limits your available download bandwidth or an attack that prevents you from using your full node’s wallet for sending transactions.
Linux Instructions
The following instructions describe installing Bitcoin Core on Linux systems.
Ubuntu 14.10 Instructions for Bitcoin Core 0.10.0.
If you use Ubuntu Desktop, click the Ubuntu swirl icon to start the Dash and type “term” into the input box. Choose any one of the terminals listed:
Alternatively, access a console or terminal emulator using another method, such as SSH on Ubuntu Server or a terminal launcher in an alternative desktop environment.
Type the following line to add the Bitcoin Personal Package Archive (PPA) to your system:
sudo apt-add-repository ppa:bitcoin/bitcoin
You will be prompted for your user password. Provide it to continue. Afterwards, the following text will be displayed:
Stable Channel of bitcoin-qt and bitcoind for Ubuntu, and their dependencies
More info: https://launchpad.net/~bitcoin/+archive/ubuntu/bitcoin
Press [ENTER] to continue or ctrl-c to cancel adding it
Press enter to continue. The following text (with some variations) will be displayed and you will be returned to the command line prompt:
gpg: keyring /tmp/tmpixuqu73x/secring.gpg' created gpg: keyring/tmp/tmpixuqu73x/pubring.gpg' created gpg: requesting key 8842CE5E from hkp server > > > >keyserver.ubuntu.com gpg: /tmp/tmpixuqu73x/trustdb.gpg: trustdb created gpg: key 8842CE5E: public key "Launchpad PPA for Bitcoin" imported gpg: no ultimately trusted keys found gpg: Total number processed: 1 pg: imported: 1 (RSA: 1) OK
Type the following line to get the most recent list of packages:
sudo apt-get update
A large number of lines will be displayed as different update files are downloaded. This step may take several minutes on a slow Internet connection.
To continue, choose one of the following options
sudo apt-get install bitcoin-qt
sudo apt-get install bitcoind
sudo apt-get install bitcoin-qt bitcoind
After choosing what packages to install, you will be asked whether you want to proceed. Press enter to continue.
If you’re logged in as an administrative user with sudo access, you may log out. The steps in this section should be performed as the user you want to run Bitcoin Core. (If you’re an expert administrator, you can make this a locked account used only by Bitcoin Core.)
Before using the Bitcoin Core daemon, bitcoind, you need to create its configuration file with a user name and password. First create the .bitcoin directory, create (touch) the file, and set the file’s permissions so that only your user account can read it. From the terminal, type:
mkdir ~/.bitcoin touch ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf chmod 600 ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf
Then you can run the command bitcoind. It will print output similar to this:
bitcoind Error: To use the "-server" option, you must set a rpcpassword in the configuration file: /home/bitcoinorg/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf It is recommended you use the following random password: rpcuser=bitcoinrpc rpcpassword=XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX (you do not need to remember this password)
The username and password MUST NOT be the same.
If the file does not exist, create it with owner-readable-only file permissions. It is also recommended to set alertnotify so you are notified of problems; for example: alertnotify=echo %s | mail -s "Bitcoin Alert" [email protected] The “rpcpassword” displayed will be unique for your system. You can copy the rpcuser and rpcpassword lines into your configuration file using the following commands. Note that in most Ubuntu terminals, you need to press Ctrl-Shift-C to copy and Ctrl-Shift-V to paste because Ctrl-C and Ctrl-V have different meanings in a Unix-style terminal.
echo rpcuser=bitcoinrpc >> ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf echo rpcpassword=XXXXXX >> ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf (Warning: Don’t use XXXXXX as your RPC password. Copy the rpcpassword displayed by bitcoind for your system.)
Now you can start Bitcoin Core daemon for real. Type the following command:
bitcoind -daemon
It will print a message that Bitcoin Core is starting. To interact with Bitcoin Core daemon, you will use the command bitcoin-cli (Bitcoin command line interface). Note: it may take up to several minutes for Bitcoin Core to start, during which it will display the following message whenever you use bitcoin-cli:
error: {"code":-28,"message":"Verifying blocks..."}
After it starts, you may find the following commands useful for basic interaction with your node:
to safely stop your node, run the following command:
bitcoin-cli stop
A complete list of commands is available in the Bitcoin.org developer reference.
When Bitcoin Core daemon first starts, it will begin to download the block chain. This step will take at least several hours, and it may take a day or more on a slow Internet connection or with a slow computer. During the download, Bitcoin Core will use a significant part of your connection bandwidth. You can stop Bitcoin Core at any time using the stop command; it will resume from the point where it stopped the next time you start it.
Optional: Start Your Node At Boot
Starting your node automatically each time your computer boots makes it easy for you to contribute to the network. The easiest way to do this is to start Bitcoin Core daemon from your crontab. To edit your crontab, run the following command:
crontab -e
@reboot bitcoind -daemon Save the file and exit; the updated crontab file will be installed for you. Now Bitcoin Core daemon will be automatically started each time your reboot your computer.
If you’re an Ubuntu expert and want to use an init script instead, see this Upstart script.
You have now completed installing Bitcoin Core. If you have any questions, please ask in one of Bitcoin’s many communities, such as Bitcoin StackExchange, BitcoinTalk technical support, or the #bitcoin IRC chatroom on Freenode.
To support the Bitcoin network, you also need to allow incoming connections. Please read the Network Configuration section for details.
Network Configuration
If you want to support the Bitcoin network, you must allow inbound connections.
When Bitcoin Core starts, it establishes 8 outbound connections to other full nodes so it can download the latest blocks and transactions. If you just want to use your full node as a wallet, you don’t need more than these 8 connections—but if you want to support lightweight clients and other full nodes on the network, you must allow inbound connections.
Servers connected directly to the Internet usually don’t require any special configuration. You can use the testing instructions below to confirm your server-based node accepts inbound connections.
Home connections are usually filtered by a router or modem. Bitcoin Core will request your router automatically configure itself to allow inbound connections to Bitcoin’s port, port 8333. Unfortunately many routers don’t allow automatic configuration, so you must manually configure your router. You may also need to configure your firewall to allow inbound connections to port 8333. Please see the following subsections for details.
Testing Connections
The BitNodes project provides an online tool to let you test whether your node accepts inbound connections. To use it, start Bitcoin Core (either the GUI or the daemon), wait 10 minutes, and then visit the GetAddr page (https://getaddr.bitnodes.io/). The tool will attempt to guess your IP address—if the address is wrong (or blank), you will need to enter your address manually.
For more instruction and reviews based off BTC please follow my subreddit /BTC_Reviews
all material from this post was found here --> https://bitcoin.org/en/full-node
submitted by Mattjhagen to rBitcoin [link] [comments]

Running a full node using Bitcoin-daemon. Instructions for Linux.

These instructions will work both on a VPS cloud server or a personal computer. You may find cheap VPS somewhere online for rent.
What Is A Full Node?
A full node is a program that fully validates transactions and blocks. Almost all full nodes also help the network by accepting transactions and blocks from other full nodes, validating those transactions and blocks, and then relaying them to further full nodes.
Most full nodes also serve lightweight clients by allowing them to transmit their transactions to the network and by notifying them when a transaction affects their wallet. If not enough nodes perform this function, clients won’t be able to connect through the peer-to-peer network—they’ll have to use centralized services instead.
Many people and organizations volunteer to run full nodes using spare computing and bandwidth resources—but more volunteers are needed to allow Bitcoin to continue to grow. This document describes how you can help and what helping will cost you.
Costs And Warnings
Running a Bitcoin full node comes with certain costs and can expose you to certain risks. This section will explain those costs and risks so you can decide whether you’re able to help the network.
Special Cases
Miners, businesses, and privacy-conscious users rely on particular behavior from the full nodes they use, so they will often run their own full nodes and take special safety precautions. This document does not cover those precautions—it only describes running a full node to help support the Bitcoin network in general.
Please consult an expert if you need help setting up your full node correctly to handle high-value and privacy-sensitive tasks.
Secure Your Wallet
It’s possible and safe to run a full node to support the network and use its wallet to store your bitcoins, but you must take the same precautions you would when using any Bitcoin wallet. Please see the securing your wallet page for more information.
Minimum Requirements
Bitcoin Core full nodes have certain requirements. If you try running a node on weak hardware, it may work—but you’ll likely spend more time dealing with issues. If you can meet the following requirements, you’ll have an easy-to-use node.
Note: many operating systems today (Windows, Mac, and Linux) enter a low-power mode after the screensaver activates, slowing or halting network traffic. This is often the default setting on laptops and on all Mac OS X laptops and desktops. Check your screensaver settings and disable automatic “sleep” or “suspend” options to ensure you support the network whenever your computer is running.
Possible Problems
Legal: Bitcoin use is prohibited or restricted in some areas.
Bandwidth limits: Some Internet plans will charge an additional amount for any excess upload bandwidth used that isn’t included in the plan. Worse, some providers may terminate your connection without warning because of overuse. We advise that you check whether your Internet connection is subjected to such limitations and monitor your bandwidth use so that you can stop Bitcoin Core before you reach your upload limit.
Anti-virus: Several people have placed parts of known computer viruses in the Bitcoin block chain. This block chain data can’t infect your computer, but some anti-virus programs quarantine the data anyway, making it more difficult to run a full node. This problem mostly affects computers running Windows.
Attack target: People who want to disrupt the Bitcoin network may attack full nodes in ways that will affect other things you do with your computer, such as an attack that limits your available download bandwidth or an attack that prevents you from using your full node’s wallet for sending transactions.
Linux Instructions
The following instructions describe installing Bitcoin Core on Linux systems.
Ubuntu 14.10 Instructions for Bitcoin Core 0.10.0.
If you use Ubuntu Desktop, click the Ubuntu swirl icon to start the Dash and type “term” into the input box. Choose any one of the terminals listed:
Alternatively, access a console or terminal emulator using another method, such as SSH on Ubuntu Server or a terminal launcher in an alternative desktop environment.
Type the following line to add the Bitcoin Personal Package Archive (PPA) to your system:
sudo apt-add-repository ppa:bitcoin/bitcoin
You will be prompted for your user password. Provide it to continue. Afterwards, the following text will be displayed:
Stable Channel of bitcoin-qt and bitcoind for Ubuntu, and their dependencies
More info: https://launchpad.net/~bitcoin/+archive/ubuntu/bitcoin
Press [ENTER] to continue or ctrl-c to cancel adding it
Press enter to continue. The following text (with some variations) will be displayed and you will be returned to the command line prompt:
gpg: keyring /tmp/tmpixuqu73x/secring.gpg' created gpg: keyring/tmp/tmpixuqu73x/pubring.gpg' created gpg: requesting key 8842CE5E from hkp server > > > >keyserver.ubuntu.com gpg: /tmp/tmpixuqu73x/trustdb.gpg: trustdb created gpg: key 8842CE5E: public key "Launchpad PPA for Bitcoin" imported gpg: no ultimately trusted keys found gpg: Total number processed: 1 pg: imported: 1 (RSA: 1) OK
Type the following line to get the most recent list of packages:
sudo apt-get update
A large number of lines will be displayed as different update files are downloaded. This step may take several minutes on a slow Internet connection.
To continue, choose one of the following options
sudo apt-get install bitcoin-qt
sudo apt-get install bitcoind
sudo apt-get install bitcoin-qt bitcoind
After choosing what packages to install, you will be asked whether you want to proceed. Press enter to continue.
If you’re logged in as an administrative user with sudo access, you may log out. The steps in this section should be performed as the user you want to run Bitcoin Core. (If you’re an expert administrator, you can make this a locked account used only by Bitcoin Core.)
Before using the Bitcoin Core daemon, bitcoind, you need to create its configuration file with a user name and password. First create the .bitcoin directory, create (touch) the file, and set the file’s permissions so that only your user account can read it. From the terminal, type:
mkdir ~/.bitcoin touch ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf chmod 600 ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf
Then you can run the command bitcoind. It will print output similar to this:
bitcoind Error: To use the "-server" option, you must set a rpcpassword in the configuration file: /home/bitcoinorg/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf It is recommended you use the following random password: rpcuser=bitcoinrpc rpcpassword=XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX (you do not need to remember this password)
The username and password MUST NOT be the same.
If the file does not exist, create it with owner-readable-only file permissions. It is also recommended to set alertnotify so you are notified of problems; for example: alertnotify=echo %s | mail -s "Bitcoin Alert" [email protected] The “rpcpassword” displayed will be unique for your system. You can copy the rpcuser and rpcpassword lines into your configuration file using the following commands. Note that in most Ubuntu terminals, you need to press Ctrl-Shift-C to copy and Ctrl-Shift-V to paste because Ctrl-C and Ctrl-V have different meanings in a Unix-style terminal.
echo rpcuser=bitcoinrpc >> ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf echo rpcpassword=XXXXXX >> ~/.bitcoin/bitcoin.conf (Warning: Don’t use XXXXXX as your RPC password. Copy the rpcpassword displayed by bitcoind for your system.)
Now you can start Bitcoin Core daemon for real. Type the following command:
bitcoind -daemon
It will print a message that Bitcoin Core is starting. To interact with Bitcoin Core daemon, you will use the command bitcoin-cli (Bitcoin command line interface). Note: it may take up to several minutes for Bitcoin Core to start, during which it will display the following message whenever you use bitcoin-cli:
error: {"code":-28,"message":"Verifying blocks..."}
After it starts, you may find the following commands useful for basic interaction with your node:
to safely stop your node, run the following command:
bitcoin-cli stop
A complete list of commands is available in the Bitcoin.org developer reference.
When Bitcoin Core daemon first starts, it will begin to download the block chain. This step will take at least several hours, and it may take a day or more on a slow Internet connection or with a slow computer. During the download, Bitcoin Core will use a significant part of your connection bandwidth. You can stop Bitcoin Core at any time using the stop command; it will resume from the point where it stopped the next time you start it.
Optional: Start Your Node At Boot
Starting your node automatically each time your computer boots makes it easy for you to contribute to the network. The easiest way to do this is to start Bitcoin Core daemon from your crontab. To edit your crontab, run the following command:
crontab -e
@reboot bitcoind -daemon Save the file and exit; the updated crontab file will be installed for you. Now Bitcoin Core daemon will be automatically started each time your reboot your computer.
If you’re an Ubuntu expert and want to use an init script instead, see this Upstart script.
You have now completed installing Bitcoin Core. If you have any questions, please ask in one of Bitcoin’s many communities, such as Bitcoin StackExchange, BitcoinTalk technical support, or the #bitcoin IRC chatroom on Freenode.
To support the Bitcoin network, you also need to allow incoming connections. Please read the Network Configuration section for details.
Network Configuration
If you want to support the Bitcoin network, you must allow inbound connections.
When Bitcoin Core starts, it establishes 8 outbound connections to other full nodes so it can download the latest blocks and transactions. If you just want to use your full node as a wallet, you don’t need more than these 8 connections—but if you want to support lightweight clients and other full nodes on the network, you must allow inbound connections.
Servers connected directly to the Internet usually don’t require any special configuration. You can use the testing instructions below to confirm your server-based node accepts inbound connections.
Home connections are usually filtered by a router or modem. Bitcoin Core will request your router automatically configure itself to allow inbound connections to Bitcoin’s port, port 8333. Unfortunately many routers don’t allow automatic configuration, so you must manually configure your router. You may also need to configure your firewall to allow inbound connections to port 8333. Please see the following subsections for details.
Testing Connections
The BitNodes project provides an online tool to let you test whether your node accepts inbound connections. To use it, start Bitcoin Core (either the GUI or the daemon), wait 10 minutes, and then visit the GetAddr page (https://getaddr.bitnodes.io/). The tool will attempt to guess your IP address—if the address is wrong (or blank), you will need to enter your address manually.
For more instruction and reviews based off BTC please follow my subreddit /BTC_Reviews
all material from this post was found here --> https://bitcoin.org/en/full-node
submitted by Mattjhagen to BTC_Reviews [link] [comments]

How-to install KDE, CINNAMON, RAZOR-QT and LXDE on MANJARO LINUX [HD] Lubuntu 20.04 Review – First LTS with LXQt Desktop Razor qt....Sharp And Light A Razor-qt asztali környezet beállítások. Razor-Qt Desktop Environment Preview

Bitcoin-QT is the original Bitcoin wallet which offers the highest level of security, privacy and stability. The application allows: sending and receiving coins; displaying the wallet status; browsing transaction history; organizing contacts in the address book; securing the wallet with password; creating backup copy of the wallet When you create a bitcoin wallet for your desktop search and also want to contribute to the upkeep of the entire bitcoin network, then you would zker Bitcoin Qt should install. Please keep in mind that this is a lot of hard disk space and takes (at this moment more than 7 gigabytes) and that it is the first time a lot of time to sync (about 24 2. 3 Easy Methods to Buy Bitcoin Anonymously. Note: In June 2019, the popular website LocalBitcoins removed its option for in person cash trades. Method 1 – Paxful. If you’re looking to buy Bitcoins anonymously then the easiest way would be to buy Bitcoins in cash and in person. Use Paxful to find someone who is willing to sell Bitcoins for cash next to your physical location. Armory Armory is an advanced Bitcoin client that expands its features for Bitcoin power users. It offers many backup and encryption features, and it allows secure cold-storage on offline computers. Bitcoin Core Bitcoin Core is a full Bitcoin client and builds the backbone of the network. It offers high levels of security, privacy, and stability. However, it has fewer features and it takes a lot of space and memory.

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How-to install KDE, CINNAMON, RAZOR-QT and LXDE on MANJARO LINUX [HD]

Razor-qt — Razor-qt is an advanced, easy-to-use, and fast desktop environment based on Qt technologies. It has been tailored for users who value simplicity, speed, and an intuitive interface. Lubuntu 20.04, Focal Fossa, is a Long Term Support Release and uses the Lightweight Qt Desktop Environment (LXQt) version 0.14.1. Most of the pre-installed apps are lightweight and designed ... Razor-Qt, environnement léger créé avec QT Lubuntu 18.10 is the latest release of Lubuntu. this release officially uses the Lightweight Qt Desktop Environment (LXQt) version 0.13.0 as the main desktop environment. The next video is starting stop. Loading... Watch Queue

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