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What is money?

Hey all, this might be a bit outside of the "Bitcoin" realm, but I wanted to create a sounding board to help me grasp what money is, how it relates to economies, and where Bitcoin can come in. I'm just writing out my thoughts, and I'm open to comments and opinions or corrections :). Hopefully this can be helpful to others too.
Note, that I live in the UK and I feel like a lot of information talks about the dollar, and I never know if it applies the same to my currency. I will give examples in dollars, but they should apply to any world currency (eg. GBP) to the best of my understanding.
I saw a link recently on this subreddit to this site: https://modernmoneybasics.com/. If I were to summarise what I learnt, it is a mental model that frames fiat currency in an interesting way, but I wouldn't be surprised if it did contain some misinformation. -- It claims that the model applies to any fiat currency.
OK. Pretend that all of a countries money = 1. If you own $100, you own a fraction of the countries money, so if there is $10,000 in the world you own 0.001 of all dollars. So naturally, if more money is printed, you start to own a smaller fraction of that money.
The Modern Money Theory (MMT) gives me the impression that money is basically a tool owned by the countries government (owned by someone who isn't the general public). Money is not an asset, it is a liability (hence why it loses value over time). People pay taxes and the Government will try to redistribute the wealth by investing in projects like The Army, Green Energy, etc.
This is supposed to be distributed in ways that help the country's economy, ensuring that the country is productive and is exporting things to other countries. When deemed necessary, more money can be printed to help redistribute wealth to the areas that the Government wants to invest in. I think that the more successful your economy, the more your money is worth.
This means one thing to me; PEOPLE DO NOT OWN/HAVE MONEY. Don't save fiat; it is a tool to help the economy, not a thing of value that you should store. I feel like saving actually keeps money from circulating in the economy and probably works towards needing to print money. Instead, buy assets; you put money back into the economy, and you get to hold onto your wealth. What can you invest in? Ok, that's not such an easy question to answer. Maybe buy gold (or *ahem* Bitcoin), or invest in yourself to make something valuable and ultimately start your own business.
MMT says that fiat has value because people pay taxes in fiat. Ultimately, we work, and earn in order to pay taxes (income, VAT, road tax, etc.). We spend in fiat, because the person accepting fiat will need to pay taxes and the next person will do the same, so now the whole country values your fiat currency.
Because of this, you need liquidity, you need to have some money to spend on groceries and living, and you need some money for a rainy day lest you end up in an emergency situation with not enough time to handle it with money. -- I think the more something costs, the more time you typically will have to pay it, so there might even be a formula you could create or use that helps you decide what to keep as cash, and what to spend.
So long story short, money is a token that represents a tiny fraction of your countries economy. It is also something that the government can manipulate and move around as it pleases in the same way a business invests in departments for its company. We are all just a cog in the machine that is our country's economy.
One thing I have not talked about, is the role of banks and credit and interest. I haven't expanded my thoughts in that area yet, but I feel like that they serve a different purpose.
Where does Bitcoin fit in? Well, just like gold, it is a potential asset. It has an interesting property though; it has liquidity. This give it the potential to be used for local trades, meaning that people can save their wealth and use it for local transactions too. It is global, so it also has the ability to be used for global transactions too. For now, it is an asset for saving your wealth; I think that as more people use it and favour it as a storage mechanism, more people will start to accept it for small trades too. Hey, maybe if there's a tool to easily calculate taxes from Bitcoin trades, that could help with adoption.
What would happen to fiat currency if everyone collected fiat for the sake of paying taxes, but used conversion tools to allow them to keep the majority of their wealth in Bitcoin while knowing the appropriate taxes to pay? Honestly, I fall short here, because at that point, you can no longer measure a country's economy by its currency. This is where I need to maybe learn how countries that do not have their own currency measure their economy.
I suppose governments, or ourselves, will have to invent new ways to measure and manage our economies, and I imagine i will be a much more transparent. I think it is an important question to answer as Bitcoin would shift wealth from being country wealth, to individual wealth (for everyone, not just those with enough income and education to invest in assets).
submitted by tookthisusersoucant to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

If I buy Bitcoin in the UK and sell it in Australia (or vice versa) how does that complicate tax?

I'm a dual citizen but reside in AU - My initial plan is to buy with my UK tax-free inheritance using £GBP, probably wait for a short time for the value to increase to cover the fees, and sell partially for AUD$, while holding the rest as a Bitcoin investment for more than a year, or until the peak of the next bull run.
In Australia if you hold for more than a year there's a 50% discount in capital gains tax, but what if I didn't buy it in Aus?
I'm unsure how to pay the least tax when I sell Bitcoin. The UK tax-free exemption yearly limit for all investments is £11,700 so perhaps I can sell this much worth for £ each year. Then if I spend it with my UK debit card in AU does that have tax implications in AU?
Thanks!
submitted by aceventura33 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

A guide to index funds

A few weeks ago I wrote a post about some things it took me a while to figure out when I started investing. This was well received, and there were some interesting follow up questions, especially around what to invest in. A commonly recommended strategy on this sub-reddit is to invest in index funds, but that was another thing that it took me a while to figure out, and my first post didn't really get that far, so I present the spiritual successor: Things I Wish I'd Known Earlier About Index Funds
This write-up is intended to broadly answer the question:
How do I invest in a way that my returns will track the overall UK, US, or global stock market?
N.B. I've also cross-posted this to a https://reboapp.co.uk/content/index-funds/, which is a knowledge base I'm building for UK investors. Let me know if there are any particular topics you'd like me to write about in future.

What is an index?

An index is a calculated value that summarises the performance of some category of assets into a single number which can be tracked over time. For indexes which track stock markets, this is typically the total valuation of the companies in some section of the stock market. For example, the FTSE 100 is an index which tracks the value of the largest 100 companies listed on the London Stock Exchange.
Market indexes are normally calculated using capitalisation weighting, where the companies included in the index are selected based on their market valuation, and the larger the market valuation of a company, the more weight it is given in the index.

What is a capitalisation-weighted index?

In a capitalisation-weighted index, the index is calculated by summing the total market value of all of the companies. This means that if one company is worth £20 billion, and another is worth £10 billion, the former company will contribute twice as much to the index. A 10% increase in the price of the former company would increase the index by twice as much as a 10% rise in the latter company.
An index is also usually normalised, so that it starts at a nice value like 1,000 on the first day it is measured. This normalisation happens by recording the sum of the market values of the companies on the first day, and then dividing later measures by this amount.

What is an index fund?

An index fund (also commonly referred to as a 'tracker') is a wrapper which will hold shares in the various assets in an index, weighted by the same weighting as in the index, so that the value of the index fund should track the underlying index closely over time. If the index goes up by 3%, then so should the index fund.
For example, an index fund which tracks the FTSE 100 has £1 billion invested in it in total, then that £1 billion will be used by the fund manager to buy £1 billion worth of shares in the FTSE 100 companies, weighted by their market value, so that the fund would hold twice as much of a £20 billion company than a £10 billion company. As the valuations rise and fall, and as companies come in and out of the FTSE 100, the index fund will buy and sell shares to keep their allocation as close to the FTSE 100 weighting as possible.

Why use capitalisation weighting for an index?

By using a capitalisation-weighted index, the index is measuring how the market is choosing to allocate capital. If the market value of one company in the index is £20 billion (the total value of all of the company's shares adds up to £20 billion), and another company has a market value of £10 billion, then the shareholders are valuing the first company at twice as much as the second. If they weren't, then some people would sell shares in the company that they thought was overvalued, and buy shares in the other company that they thought was undervalued, until the prices shifted to match what people think. Of course some people might think this, while others think the opposite, so the market value only represents the average sentiment of the shareholders. There is no correct objective valuation, only the valuation that comes from the average of all the shareholder decisions. This is why we talk about market value rather than just value. By using a capitalisation-weighted index, the index tracks this market valuation.
Now we could define loads of different indexes based on completely different criteria. For example, rather than worrying about market capitalisation, we could form an index based upon the value of all companies whose names begin with an 'L'. It's unlikely that this would tell us anything particularly interesting about the market though!

Why the market average is the best you can do

When you invest in an index fund tracking a capitalisation-weighted index, you are delegating your investment decisions to the market. You will be investing in companies in the index in proportion to how much capital everyone else has invested in these companies. This may seem like blindly following the herd, and you might think that you can do better than this, but you almost certainly can't.
The reason you can't beat the market is that it's a zero-sum game - if you're going to do better than the average, someone else has to do worse than the average. So if you are going to do better than the market average over the long term, you need to make better decisions than at least 50% of the other people making active investment decisions. When the market contains institutional investors, hedge funds, people with PhDs, very fast computers, and significant amounts of money, it's unlikely that you're going to be in the upper half.
Instead of trying to beat the market average yourself, you might be tempted to invest in an actively managed fund, where the investors try to make strategic picks to beat the market. The managers of such funds certainly have more resources available to them than you, and some even have excellent histories of market beating returns. However, there's no way for you to tell if an actively managed fund is actually better than the market average, or if they've just been lucky in the past.
To illustrate this, consider the following thought experiment: If I pick 500 people and ask them to flip a coin 10 times in a row, I'd expect one or two of them to get 10 heads in row. If we pick one of those people, and look at their coin flipping record, then this person appears to be very talented at flipping a coin and getting heads. However, if I asked them to flip the coin again, they would have a 50/50 chance, just like everyone else. So in a world where there are many actively managed funds, some will have done better than the market average in the past. But how can we tell whether they were just lucky, or, on the contrary, if they will continue to beat the market? The unfortunate answer is you likely can't.

Structure of Index Funds

So far, we've covered the basics of the index fund concept, but in order to actually get your money invested, you'll need to know a little bit about what real index funds look like in practice. If you haven't already, this might be a good time to review my original post on getting started with investing.
In the UK there are two common types index funds:
The legal structure of these funds doesn't matter too much to you as a personal investor, but there are some differences between OEICs and ETFs that you should be familiar with:
For more information on the differences between OEICs and ETFs, check out this write up from Monevator, as well as the wiki here in /ukpersonalfinance:

Company size, geography and other factors

Hopefully the previous sections have demystified the workings of indexes and index funds to some degree. However, you may still have questions about which index funds to invest in. That's worth a whole separate write up, but here is a brief overview of the landscape of some of the different types of index funds that are available:

Large cap, mid cap and small cap

Large cap companies are those with the largest capitalisations, and in the UK typically refers to the FTSE 100 companies. That is, the largest 100 companies in the UK. The smallest company in the FTSE 100 has a market capitalisation of around £4 billion. Some example index funds tracking large cap companies are:
Mid cap companies are those with smaller capitalisations, typically referring to the FTSE 250 companies, which are the 101st-350th companies in the UK by market capitalisation. The market capitalisation of these ranges between around £4 billion to £500 million. Some example index funds:
Small cap companies are those with smaller market capitalisations still, but it's a less well defined list than large or mid cap companies. An example index fund:

Geography

Index funds also provide a convenient way to invest in foreign markets, outside the UK. The funds are located in the UK, and priced in GBP, so they are very accessible to a UK investor, but can hold investments in European, US, or global markets.
The S&P 500 index is similar to the FTSE 100 index in the UK, but tracking the top 500 companies in the US. The Vanguard S&P 500 ETF is an index fund tracking the S&P 500.
Likewise, the EURO STOXX 50 index tracks the largest 50 companies in Europe, and can be invested in through index funds such as the iShares EURO STOXX 50 UCITS ETF.
There also exist indexes which aim to track the global market, such as the MSCI World index.

Other assets

As well as indexes which track company valuations, there are indexes which track bond valuations. For example the Vanguard UK Government Bond Index Fund aims to track the Bloomberg Barclays U.K. Government Float Adjusted Bond Index.
Index funds can also track other asset classes, like gold, property, and even alternative assets like Bitcoin.

Funds of funds

A single index typically represents a narrow cross section of the world, likely tracking only companies of a certain size, in a certain region, or a certain asset class. You may need to hold investments tracking multiple indexes in order to have a diversified portfolio across different assets types, company sizes and geographies. Rather than doing this manually, it is also possible to invest directly in a fund of funds. In this case, the fund holds a number of different underlying funds, tracking different indexes. This allows a single fund to have appropriate diversification.
Some examples of these funds of funds, particularly those aimed at passive investors are:
Hopefully this article has helped to explain what an index fund is, and why you might be interested in investing in index funds. The above examples are certainly not a full list of the available indexes and index funds, and you should definitely do further research into which funds are most appropriate for your investment goals.
Good luck with your investment journey!
submitted by jpallen to UKPersonalFinance [link] [comments]

How I Got Paid By 65 Different Beermoney Programs in 2018 [Guide]

How I Got Paid By 65 Different Beermoney Programs in 2018

Hi! Welcome to my guide for everything that paid me in 2018. Before I begin, here are a few details:
Now, let’s get into the good stuff.

1. Quickthoughts - $590

This was my top earner for the year and it only took me up until September to earn this amount. I had to stop because they require a W9 for anything over $600 and I was too lazy to file that. It is pretty similar to a traditional survey router, but I seem to have much better luck with not disqualifying here. I get paid $1 per survey but some people earn $2 per survey based on their demographics. Some people have issues with bans and getting locked out of accounts, so it is not for everyone. Because of this, it is important to cash out the minute you hit the cashout minimum of $10. There are both android and iOS apps but I highly recommend using android if possible because the iOS app pays in iTunes gift cards and the android app pays in Amazon gift cards. Overall, Quickthoughts is great if you are one of the lucky ones without account issues.

2. CrowdTap - $270

This is one of my favorite beermoney programs of all time. You complete a variety of very short polls and questions about consumer goods, food products, and services. The polls pay 1.5 cents each and the short answer questions pay 10 cents each. There are other ways that they ask questions, including longer surveys that are a combination between the polls and questions. All of them are well worth it for the time that they take. Reward options include Amazon, Target, Walmart, Steam, Xbox, and more. You can cash out starting at $5 and I am able to cash out about once a week. Definitely add this one to your routine if you have not yet.

3. Prolific Academic - $197.95

This one is great. Take academic surveys for universities and researchers and get paid in cash. As long as you don’t miss attention checks you won’t get disqualified. Some people get multiple surveys a day and others get only a few a week based on demographics. Many pay at least minimum wage. I could have made a lot more on here if I tried. Universally regarded as one of the most “worth it” survey sites so give it a shot!

4. Pinecone Research - $138 + Ranch Dip and Dog Chews

Pinecone pays a guaranteed $3 for 10-15 min surveys regarding opinions on new products. They also send free samples sometimes! You can cash out for a variety of gift cards or PayPal. I get about 1 survey a week on average. Pinecone is invite only so look for invites to sign up on other GPT sites as sometimes you can find them there. If you get in it is some of the best money you can make with surveys for the time you spend on it.

5. Branded Surveys - $130

Branded Surveys has traditional router surveys. A major perk of using Branded used to be their generous daily login bonus. This has been reduced to 5 cents a day, so it might not be worth using this site for the login bonus alone anymore. They have a very high EngageMe rate at one cent per 3 videos if that’s your thing as well! Payouts start at $10 via Paypal and Amazon.

6. Nicequest - $120

Big fan of this one. Their surveys have guaranteed rewards even if you screen out and can pay up to $2-3 for like 10-15 minutes. Their currency is “shells” and each shell converts to about 7 cents. Installing their meter on your devices adds a guaranteed 5 shells per survey. If you add it to your computer, phone, and tablet you get an extra 15 shells (about a dollar) per survey. I just have it on my computer so I get 5 bonus shells. Cashouts are quick for e-gift cards and they also offer physical items. Saving up for larger gift cards typically gives you better rates.

7. PrizeRebel - $107

PrizeRebel is your typical GPT site with a variety of ways to earn, but it is most well-known for surveys. They pay $0.80 per survey on the YourSurvey router and that is where a majority of my earnings have come. Lots of cashout options starting at $2.

8. YouGov - $100

YouGov is a survey site/app that pays anywhere from $0.50 to $2 per survey. The best part of it is that you never disqualify. I get a couple surveys a week. Most of the surveys are about public policy, politics, or general opinions of companies. You get the best value for your points if you save up for the $100 cash out. They offer the $100 cash out in bank transfer and Amazon. The Amazon gift card option used to be a physical mailed card but now its an e-gift card so that makes it even better! They offer other gift cards but they are for smaller values at worse rates so I would avoid them. Available online, on android, and on iOS.

9. iMoney - $89

Get paid to download apps! The best thing about iMoney is that the apps always credit and you can get credit for apps you have downloaded before. That’s not the case on most paid-to-download apps. Earn 15-30 cents per app and there are 3-4 new apps available each day. They offer Amazon and PayPal but PayPal has a small fee. Added this towards the end of the year and hope to make more next year. Might not be in the app store at the moment? Couldn’t find a link to put in the title.

10. VeryDice - $65

Roll dice, get points, redeem for physical items and e-gift cards. I get the daily spin rolls every day and watch their ads for more rolls. The key to VeryDice is saving up approximately 100 rolls before rolling to have enough to get the daily doubles bonus of $0.30. Worth keeping on your phone even if it’s just for the daily spin rolls. Available on both iOS and Andoid. If you want to enter my ref code at sign up you’ll get 30 free rolls :). It is 1319422.

11. Forthright - $62

Sign up and receive invitations to surveys via email. Don’t do their “partner surveys”, they rarely credit and you can get stuck in an endless loop. Their non-partner surveys are awesome. They pay well for the time spent but they also have one of the best disqualification bonusses I have ever seen. Every three surveys you take, regardless of whether you disqualify or not, you get a $2 bonus. That is $0.66 per survey on top of its base pay regardless of whether you qualify or not. They pay instantly with PayPal, Amazon, or Bitcoin.

12. VolKno - $55

Do you like movies? Then this one’s for you. Watch, rate, and tag movie trailers to earn Amazon gift cards. Each trailer has three stages and after completing all three you will make 23.5 cents per trailer. One thing to keep in mind is that you need a physical verification card sent to a US address in order to activate your account. I completed basically every trailer that was posted over the year, so my earnings are a good estimate of what you can plan on earning.

13. Inbox Dollars - $52.03

A pretty shit GPT site with a high minimum cash out. Not sure how I ever hit the minimum cash out here. Would not recommend.

14. Zap Surveys (Ref for $0.75 bonus) - $52.03

There are three main ways to earn here: a 3 cent daily login bonus, 7 cent location rewards for opening the app when a notification appears, and surveys. If you’re going to do surveys on here do relatively short TapResearch ones. The location rewards alone are why I use this app. The one negative of this app is that the cash out minimum is $25. Definitely worth having on your phone!

15. PointClub - $50

This is a pretty normal survey site. They have a daily login streak bonus that can double the value of your surveys when you reach the max streak which can make a lot of them worth your time. I stopped receiving surveys, so I assume I’m banned? So be careful with this one. Cash out minimums are $25 which is higher than I would like.

16. Survey Monkey Rewards - $49.15

Another one of my favorites. Survey Monkey Rewards is a survey app created by Survey Monkey, a big name in survey development software. Surveys all take under 3-4 minutes and pay either 25 or 35 cents based on length. I almost never disqualify, and you can cash out instantly to Amazon starting at $5. Available on Android and iOS.

17. Earn.com - $71.31

Earn.com lets people pay Bitcoin to contact you. I mostly received BTC to sign up for ICOs and airdrops for random tokens. They were aquired by Coinbase so there are changes to the program. They require a LinkedIn to make an account now as well (I think). If you can get into the program still it is pretty great!

18. MyPoints - $45

This is a sister-site to Swagbucks. I have decent success with their surveys so I use it for that. They have some other ways to earn but I don’t use them. If you have the same success with their surveys it might be worth using.

19. MicroWorkers - $44.16

Basically a smaller and sketchier MTurk. Lots of short tasks with decent earning potential but you have to find the right type of tasks for you. I did the click, search tasks for a while. There is PayPal with a $9 minimum but if I remember right they mail you a physical card with a pin before you can cash out to verify your identity. Not for everyone but worth a look.

20. SurveysOnTheGo - $43.30

This one is pretty simple. Get surveys on your phone, and redeem for Amazon, Visa, PayPal, and Starbucks! Surveys range from $0.50-$10. Some are location based and involve in-store activities. The more involved the surveys are, the more they pay. Don’t expect a ton of surveys, but many of them are worth your time. Available on Android and iOS. Minimum cash out is $10.

21. Survey Junkie - $40

This survey site is average at best. I am having less success with them recently because I can’t be bothered to take a 20 minute survey for $0.90. The one benefit of this site is that they have a VERY small disqualification bonus. Some people do have success taking surveys on here and the cash out minimum is $10.

22. E-Poll - $35

Another survey provider with no disqualifications! Woohoo! You receive email notifications when you have a new survey. Surveys pay $0.50-$2 and are usually not too long. They pay via a points system and you get better rates if you save up for the higher rewards. I cash out for Amazon, and they can take a long time to deliver rewards so be patient.

23. MooCash - $33.60

MooCash pays you to download apps and then open them for 3 days once a day. I have gotten paid as much as $2 for a single app download. They don’t always credit super easily so I would only try the better paying ones. You can cash out for BTC, Amazon, PayPal, and more. You can use my ref code (EHNPNC) when you sign up for some free coins. I think it’s only available to the first 20 people.

24. InstaGC - $33

This is a pretty basic and easy to use GPT site. Very low cashout minimums with lots of options. Check out LiveSample and YourSurveys for a good place to start on surveys.

25. PaidViewpoint (Ref) - $32.65

Short surveys with minimum PayPal cashout of $15. There are short surveys to collect demographic information that pay 10 cents. If you qualify for any of the longer surveys they can pay as much as $1.50. Surveys can be sporadic so just check the site once a day. Worth the time it takes to put into it.

26. UserCrowd (UsabilityHub) - $32.40

UsabilityHub, now rebranded to UserCrowd, pays you to give feedback on websites and products. Each task pays anywhere from 10-50 cents and the minimum cash out is $10. UserCrowd is nice because unlike other usability testing sites you don’t need to record your voice or screen. I leave it in a pinned tab on Chrome and get notifications when there is a new task. They can vary in how often you get them. I enjoy this one, give it a shot.

27. OnePulse - $30

This app has very short surveys with guaranteed rewards. You never disqualify or anything like that. I get a notification that I have a new paid survey about once a week. Surveys pay 30 cents to start but as you “level up” they become worth slightly more. Right now mine are worth 34 cents. Cashout is at $5 via PayPal. Available on iOS and Android.

28. Watchback - $30

This is the best sweepstakes app I have used. You get entries into the sweepstakes by watching videos. Each video is an entry. I watch 10 videos a day and usually win either $0.50 or $1 each day. It pays via Perk points so it’s a nice supplement to your Perk routine. If this keeps being so easy to win I should make a lot more with it next year! Available on Android and iOS.

29. Dabbl - $30

I started using Dabbl towards the very end of the year. They offer short brand-sponsored polls and videos that pay anywhere from 5-20 cents. These are super infrequent and cashing out from these alone would take the better part of a year. Where I earn with Dabbl is their non-passive ads. You get paid 1 cent per ad so I run them when I’m doing other things. It adds up. They don’t offer Amazon so I cash out for Target. Cash outs are at $5. iOS and Android.

30. Gravy - $25

This is a pretty fun game show app. To summarize the game, you pick a percentage that you think a product will sell out at, and if you’re within the closest few people to the right percentage you win a decent little chunk of cash. I’ve won once. You can buy discounted products on here as well. Go check it out, it’s pretty addicting. My ref code is “Leeves” if you want to throw some bonus guesses my way :).

31. KinIt - $25

Take short polls and quizzes and get paid 6-25 cents a day. The unfortunate thing about KinIt is that they very rarely have their gift cards in stock. When they have them in stock they have a decent selection. Still worth your time in my opinion. iOS and Android are supported.

32. Life Fun and Everything - $25

This was an invite-only survey panel that gives me a $2 survey once a month. Found it on some GPT site.

33. Panel - $25

Install Panel on your phone and get paid for sharing your location data. They drastically reduced their pay rate recently so I’m not sure it’s worth it anymore. Previously you could expect to make about $25 a year.

34. Perksy (Ref) - $25

Short polls that pay anywhere from $0.50 to $1. I get about one a week. Only downside is that the minimum cash out is $25. Various gift cards (including Amazon) are available. Definitely worth keeping on your phone. I think it’s iOS only at this time.

35. Swagbucks - $25

One of the easiest GPT sites to use. Lots of offer walls and surveys. I don’t make a lot here but basically just do daily search, daily poll, Swago, and SwagIQ. If I wasn’t banned from their surveys for some reason I might make a little more. I use swagbucks from time to time to find easy offers to do. Overall, a decent place to start of you’re experimenting with beermoney for the first time.

36. Survey Mini- $25

This app uses your location data and pays you 10 cents (sometimes more) to fill out a short poll about stores and restaurants that you go to. They recently added e-gift cards instead of physical cards so that makes it a lot more attractive to use! iOS and Android.

37. IBotta - $20

This is one of the better apps that give you rebates on select grocery items as you shop in-store. If you buy a lot of groceries, there is money to be made here. They also have traditional online cashback portals and offers.

38. Streetbees - $19

This app has surveys with a more personal and fun spin. You get paid via PayPal for each task that you finish. There aren’t always tasks available but when there are, they often pay well. I had one for testing an app that paid $9! It’s a nice option for something a little different than traditional surveys.

39. AttaPoll - $15.29

Attapoll is a survey app that sends you more traditional router surveys (many of which are Cint surveys). You might disqualify quite a bit here depending on your demographic so I stick to the short ones. Payouts are via PayPal, Bitcoin, and Ethereum. PayPal starts at $3 (nice), ETH at $3.50, and BTC at an insane $100. On both Android and iOS.

40. Smores - $15

Smores is an Android lock screen app that pays a flat $0.10 a day for unlocking your device once. Their non-passive video section pays a cent per 2 videos at the moment so that can be a decent earner as well. Cash out as low as $1 for Amazon and other gift cards. I was pretty inconsistent in my daily unlocks this year and hope to increase my earnings next year.

41. Crowdology - $10.04

Very straight forward. Do surveys, get paid. Some people have success with this type of site, and others disqualify a lot. I would stick to any surveys under 10 minutes in length to avoid wasting your time. Cash out for Amazon or PayPal at $10.

42. Achievement - $10

This app pays you based on your steps. I have it connected to Apple Health. It took me about 9 months to earn $10 and I am pretty active. Android and iOS are both supported. Doesn’t run in the background or drain my battery from what I can tell so it’s very passive and harmless.

43. Gamermine (Ref code for $1 bonus) - $10

This is a GPT site with a few offer walls. They have good EngageMe rates as well as a 5 cent daily bonus as long as you’re making a dollar a week on offers on the site. This is basically the only truly passive income that I have made this year from running EngageMe.

44. Cross Media Panel - $10

This is a program through Google that paid you to let them have an extension on your browser and on your phone. They discontinued most of this program so I am no longer earning from them. Parts of this program still exist but I haven’t looked into it much. Probably just worth skipping over at this point.

45. Lifetap - $10

This app is just a garbage survey router now. It used to have some other short guaranteed-pay surveys. I wouldn’t mess with this anymore.

46. PayTime - $9.99

Paytime lets you earn money for your subscriptions by watching ads and answering a few questions about them. You can only cash out once a month because it is supposed to be used for monthly subscriptions. All they do is send you $9.99 via PayPal or Venmo once you watch 40 ads. The catch with PayTime is that you need to be a student at one of the universities that they support. Check their website for the list. Overall, if you are a student it could be an easy $10 a month. Hope to use this more next year.

47. Ready Games - $9.19

Get paid to play games! There is a new game every 48 hours and the top 20% of scores at the end of the time period get paid. The top player makes $7 and the payout decreases as you go down the ranks. I have won somewhere around $2.50 every game that I have made it into the top 20%. Pays via PayPal when you win. On Android and iOS. You can use share code “lucky-disk-68” if you want to give me some extra lives :).

48. Carepoynt - $7

This is a pretty bad healthy living/rewards site. I think they had a few easy ways to earn, like downloading their app, and that’s how I cashed out. There was a post about it so be looking for opportunities like these on the subreddit. I won’t be using this again.

49. Amazon Shipping History Task - $6

Look for tasks like this that get posted on the subreddit. Got paid to submit some shipping data from Amazon.

50. DailyWin - $6

This used to be a scratch card app with a non-passive video section but it seems to be dead. Move along, nothing to see here.

51. CitizenMe - $5.97

Take short polls. Get instantly paid small amounts of money via Paypal. Pays in GBP so if your currency is USD you get to take advantage of that increase in value. Polls are spotty but worth it due to the instant payout (so no minimum or anything like that). iOS and Android.

52. PollPass - $5.15

Answer polls and get paid! Pays via PayPal at $5. Very simple and fun to use. Just answer the polls whenever they are available and watch the points add up. Added this at the end of the year so hope to expand on this next year.

53. Brand Insights Polling - $5

I honestly have no clue how I got paid by them. I think I took a survey that I found from a Facebook ad or something?

54. CashForApps - $5

Get paid to download apps! They don’t pay the best and sometimes have a hard time crediting but still might be worth a shot. The very best paying apps pay around 30 cents. Some pay pennies. Available on iOS and Android. You can use my invite code “4848a6” and get a few free points.

55. EarnWallet - $5

This was a from a promotion that was posted on beermoney for just downloading EarnWallet. Check out the sub for opportunities for occasional promotional opportunities like this.

56. Shopkick - $5

Scan items, check into stores, and earn cash back for buying certain items. Not a huge earner but can be fun to mess around with when you’re out shopping. Available on iOS and Android.

57. Louder Rewards - $5

This app paid $5 Amazon to download 5 apps and use them for 3 minutes. It was a one time offer so I don’t use it anymore. It’s on iOS and Android.

58. Qmee - $4.68

Install their extension and get paid a few cents for random searches that you make. They also have surveys. I use PayPal to cash out and there aren’t any minimums that that’s cool!

59. Google Opinion Rewards - $4.68

This app sends you occasional very short surveys from Google that pay 10-20 cents. Using Google services and being mobile seems to increase the number of surveys that you get. Some people get a lot, some get less. Worth just having on your phone. The iOS app pays via PayPal and the Android app just give you Google Play credits.

60. College Pulse - $5

This app has polls for college students to take. I think you need a .edu email address? Their rewards kinda suck so I stopped using it but they had an offer to cashout for $5 bitcoin to the Ben bitcoin wallet so I did that. Maybe worth it depending on what reward options they have at the time. Android and iOS.

61. Fetch Ref Code For $2-$5 Bonus: XE2XG - $3

Scan receipts and get paid. I get 2.5 cents per receipt on average. They also have products that you can get rebates on when you buy (sorta like iBotta). They only accept grocery store receipts. A good addition to your receipt scanning routine.

62. Quick Survey - $1.61

See my section on iMoney. Very similar but with less apps available and larger fees.

63. CoinOut - $1.02

This is one of the most straight forward receipt scanning apps. It pays 1-5 cents a receipt (typically 2 cents). Cash out starts at $1 for Amazon or PayPal which is way lower than most receipt apps. Very nice. Hope to earn more with this next year. Has both Android and iOS apps.

64. Indeed Job Spotter - $1

This app pays you $0.50 per sign to submit help wanted signs that you find around your city. I have never actually submitted a sign but got paid $0.10 per sign to verify the validity of other people’s signs. I’ve seen people make pretty decent money on here.

65. 1Q - $0.25

This one seemed cool at first. Take short polls, get paid $0.25 instantly via PayPal. The problem is that I never get polls anymore. Others have had the same experience. You might be able to squeak a few cents out of it. Android and iOS.

TOTAL: $3014.92

Hope this helps you guys out, and if you have any questions let me know! Let me know what I should add to my routine :). Thanks to everyone who contributes to this subreddit because I found many of these programs thanks to you! Have a great 2019!
submitted by Goldeneye0242 to beermoney [link] [comments]

Counos DEX From A User's Eye

Counos DEX From A User's Eye

Counos Platform
Trade cleaves the consumer from a wholesale purchase or acquires. It explains what kind of sale it is. Its services and products are assumed to be sold. Not even sold, they are marketed only to white-collar Interior Designers, Decorators, and Architects. But being in a market you are always looking for some specified save trading and marketing because no one wants to lose. How would you do save marketing? Have you heard the term decentralized exchange? Have you heard the term counos? Counos DEX matter? Let’s begin with the counos introduction to meet the need of DEX Counos As A Blockchain Platform: Counos is a blockchain platform, which means there is a system in which documentation of negotiation made in bitcoin or another cryptocurrency is conserved covering some computers that are linked in a peer-to-peer network and that is very much indistinguishable to bitcoin. It allows decentralized transactions between the junctions of the network. Practically everyone in the blockchain space concurs that decentralized exchanges are the ensuing of cryptocurrency trading. That’s because, in today’s industry, the trading digital advantage is neither secure nor uncomplicated.

https://preview.redd.it/qvgribuycl441.jpg?width=600&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=ffb18fd708d764afb0287f9cc08b6cf101011c10

Tradings and Trafficking With Centralized Exchange:

To start trading, you must first buy virtue with fiat currency (USD, EUR, GBP, AUD, etc.) between fiat gateway ministration, which often charges soaring fees and proffer appalling exchange rates. Only a few paramount digital currencies are accessible. Once you’ve made acquire, you no prolonged have control of your own funds— the swap or exchange does.
This system forces centralized exchanges to be accountable for holding and sheltered all users’ funds. As a result, exchanges must control a few centralized wallets that dominance big amounts of wealth. By using this service, everyone alone can have his own exchange network.
A cold wallet that reportedly is the possession of to Binance, for example, holds over 169,000 BTC, more than $1.3 billion worth of Bitcoin at the time of writing. And this is just a solitary cold pochette of one exchange. This engrossment of wealth makes exchanges the consummate quarry for bad actors. Hackers have stolen billions of dollars’ worth of digital forte over the last few years, underscoring a mammoth security hiccup for the entire industry.
The tincture is decentralization. If all trafficking is fully peer-to-peer means only two users are involved, as on a decentralized exchange, then the negotiator will no longer require to clench and control users’ funds. It manufactures the industry far more firm. It also assists acquisition by greatly clarify the trading process.

DEX and Solution for Your Problems:

There is roughly one hundred decentralized exchange concordat in maturing or accessible for live trading. However, there are numerous projects calling themselves a decentralized exchange that is not literally decentralized.
With a decentralized exchange (DEX), your endowments are always in your guardianship, thus abolishing the security proceeding that infestation centralized exchanges. This means your funds are in your manage and endure much safer. Real decentralized exchanges must also be without permission because, if a DEX requires users to acquire sanction, then there must some centralized entity controlling it.
Users never need to down payment or withdraw funds to trade on a true DEX. On top of that, DEXs supply better privacy, transparency, and censorship-resistance, and permit unlimited trading pairs using technologies like atomic reciprocate. With atomic reciprocate technology, traders can make cross-chain exchanges between any two listed forte.

Counos DEX:

A decentralized exchange is a kind of cryptocurrency exchange that drudgery in a decentralized manner, which expresses that there is no central authority elaborated in it. In a decentralized exchange, users will be able to trade cryptocurrencies in a way in which users are just involved.
Now you are thinking what is special about a counos decentralized exchange, or a DEX is that users do not need to convey their virtue to the exchange platform, and thus their virtue is much less endangered and risk Contra theft from the hewing of the exchange platform.
Counos Decentralized exchanges also avert counterfeit or manipulation of prices. Counos DEX has minimum chances of loss because of its user to user interaction manner, no third person is involved so you might feel safe and secure.
Recently, the crypto clique has inclined or disposed toward counos decentralized exchanges, and hence, there are many cryptocurrency decentralized exchanges that are accessible in the crypto market.
Counos Decentralized Exchange (Counos DEX), permits you to acquaintance with a non-identical decentralized exchange in a particular manner where just users are interconnected and safe. Counos DEX utilizes Multisig wallet technology to give high security in the way of exchanging the crypto redeeming feature.
But what makes Counos DEX surely stand out from other decentralized cryptocurrency exchanges is this unique characteristic of Counos DEX in which all exchanges take place on the organizational structures of Counos Escrow. When it comes to upheaval, technology, and security, Counos Escrow is one of the top-class online escrow assistance all over the globe.
https://dex.counos.world/
submitted by Counosplatform to u/Counosplatform [link] [comments]

A few stories about Brian Krebs: The independent cybercrime journalist who exposes criminals on the internet

First, a bit of introduction before we get into the living drama that is Brian Krebs.
Brian Krebs has been a journalist for decades, starting in the late 90s. He got his start at The Washington Post, but what he's most famous for are his exposes on criminal businesses and individuals who perpetuate cyber crime worldwide. In 2001, he got his interest in cybercrime piqued when a computer worm locked him out of his own computer. In 2005, he shifted from working as a staff writer at The Washington Post's tech newswire to writing for their security blog, "Security Wire". During his tenure there, he started by focusing on the victims of cybercrime, but later also started to focus on the perpetrators of it as well. His reporting helped lead to the shutdown of McColo, a hosting provider who provided service to some of the world's biggest spammers and hackers. Reports analyzing the shutdown of McColo estimated that global spam volume dropped by between 40 and 70 percent. Further analysis revealed it also played host to child pornography sites, and the Russian Business Network, a major Russian cybercrime ring.
In 2009, Krebs left to start his own site, KrebsOnSecurity. Since then, he's been credited with being the first to report on major events such as Stuxnet and when Target was breached, resulting in the leakage of 40 million cards. He also regularly investigates and reveals criminals' identities on his site. The latter has made him the bane of the world of cybercrime, as well as basically a meme, where criminals will include references like Made by Brian Krebs in their code, or name their shops full of stolen credit cards after him.
One of his first posts on his new site was a selection of his best work. While not particularly dramatic, they serve as an excellent example of dogged investigative work, and his series reveal the trail of takedowns his work has documented, or even contributed to.
And now, a selection of drama involving Krebs. Note, all posts are sarcastically-tinged retellings of the source material which I will link throughout. I also didn't use the real names in my retellings, but they are in the source material. This took way too long to write, and it still does massively condense the events described in the series. Krebs has been involved with feuds with other figures, but I'd argue these tales are the "main" bits of drama that are most suited for here.

Fly on the Wall

By 2013, Krebs was no stranger to cybercriminals taking the fight to the real world. He was swatted previously to the point where the police actually know to give him a ring and see if there'd actually been a murder, or if it was just those wacky hackers at it again. In addition, his identity was basically common knowledge to cybercriminals, who would open lines of credit in his name, or find ways to send him money using stolen credit cards.
However, one particular campaign against him caught his eye. A hacker known as "Fly" aka "Flycracker" aka "MUXACC1" posted on a Russian-language fraud forum he administered about a "Krebs fund". His plan was simple. Raise Bitcoin to buy Heroin off of a darknet marketplace, address it to Krebs, and alert his local police via a spoofed phone call. Now, because Krebs is an investigative journalist, he develops undercover presences on cybercrime forums, and it just so happened he'd built up a presence on this one already.
Guys, it became known recently that Brian Krebs is a heroin addict and he desperately needs the smack, so we have started the "Helping Brian Fund", and shortly we will create a bitcoin wallet called "Drugs for Krebs" which we will use to buy him the purest heroin on the Silk Road. My friends, his withdrawal is very bad, let’s join forces to help the guy! We will save Brian from the acute heroin withdrawal and the world will get slightly better!
Fly had first caught Krebs' attention by taunting him on Twitter, sending him Tweets including insults and abuse, and totally-legit looking links. Probably either laced with malware, or designed to get Krebs' IP. He also took to posting personal details such as Krebs' credit report, directions to his house, and pictures of his front door on LiveJournal, of all places.
So, after spotting the scheme, he alerted his local police that he'd probably have someone sending him some China White. Sure enough, the ne'er-do-wells managed to raise 2 BTC, which at the time was a cool $200 or so. They created an account on the premiere darknet site at the time, The Silk Road under the foolproof name "briankrebs7". They found one seller who had consistently high reviews, but the deal fell through for unknown reasons. My personal theory is the seller decided to Google where it was going, and realized sending a gram of dope into the waiting arms of local law enforcement probably wasn't the best use of his time. Still, the forum members persevered, and found another seller who was running a buy 10 get 2 free promotion. $165 of Bitcoin later, the drugs were on their way to a new home. The seller apparently informed Fly that the shipment should arrive by Tuesday, a fact which he gleefully shared with the forum.
While our intrepid hero had no doubt that the forum members were determined to help him grab the tail of the dragon, he's not one to assume without confirmation, and enlisted the help of a graduate student at UCSD who was researching Bitcoin and anonymity on The Silk Road, and confirmed the address shared by Fly was used to deposit 2 BTC into an account known to be used for money management on the site.
By Monday, an envelope from Chicago had arrived, containing a copy of Chicago confidential. Taped inside were tiny baggies filled with the purported heroin. Either dedicated to satisfied customers, or mathematically challenged, the seller had included thirteen baggies instead of the twelve advertised. A police officer arrived to take a report and whisked the baggies away.
Now, Fly was upset that Krebs wasn't in handcuffs for drug possession, and decided to follow up his stunt by sending Krebs a floral arrangement shaped like a cross, and an accompanying threatening message addressed to his wife, the dire tone slightly undercut by the fact that it was signed "Velvet Crabs". Krebs' curiosity was already piqued from the shenanigans with the heroin, but with the arrival of the flowers decided to dive deeper into the сука behind things.
He began digging into databases from carding sites that had been hacked, but got his first major breakthrough to his identity from a Russian computer forensics firm. Fly had maintained an account on a now-defunct hacking forum, whose database was breached under "Flycracker". It turns out, the email Flycracker had used was also hacked at some point, and a source told Krebs that the email was full of reports from a keylogger Fly had installed on his wife's computer. Now, because presumably his wife wasn't part of, or perhaps even privy to her husband's illicit dealings, her email account happened to be her full legal name, which Krebs was able to trace to her husband. Now, around this time, the site Fly maintained disappeared from the web, and administrators on another major fraud forum started purging his account. This is a step they typically take when they suspect a member has been apprehended by authorities. Nobody knew for sure, but they didn't want to take any chances.
More research by Krebs revealed that the criminals' intuition had been correct, and Fly was arrested in Italy, carrying documents under an assumed name. He was sitting in an Italian jail, awaiting potential extradition to the United States, as well as potentially facing charges in Italy. This was relayed to Krebs by a law enforcement official who simply said "The Fly has been swatted". (Presumably while slowly removing a pair of aviator sunglasses)
While Fly may have been put away, the story between Krebs and Fly wasn't quite over. He did end up being extradited to the US for prosecution, but while imprisoned in Italy, Fly actually started sending Krebs letters. Understandably distrustful after the whole "heroin" thing, his contacts in federal law enforcement tested the letter, and found it to be clean. Inside, there was a heartfelt and personal letter, apologizing for fucking with Krebs in so many ways. He also forgave Krebs for posting his identity online, leading him to muse that perhaps Fly was working through a twelve-step program. In December, he received another letter, this time a simple postcard with a cheerful message wishing him a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year. Krebs concluded his post thusly:
Cybercrooks have done some pretty crazy stuff to me in response to my reporting about them. But I don’t normally get this kind of closure. I look forward to meeting with Fly in person one day soon now that he will be just a short train ride away. And he may be here for some time: If convicted on all charges, Fly faces up to 30 years in U.S. federal prison.
Fly ultimately was extradited. He plead guilty and was sentenced to 41 months in jail

vDOS and Mirai Break The Internet

Criminals are none too happy when they find their businesses and identities on the front page of KrebsOnSecurity. It usually means law enforcement isn't far behind. One such business was known as vDOS. A DDOS-for-hire (also known as a "booter" or a "stresser") site that found itself hacked, with all their customer records still in their databases leaked. Analysis of the records found that in a four-month time span, the service had been responsible for about 8.81 years worth of attack time, meaning on average at any given second, there were 26 simultaneous attacks running. Interestingly, the hack of vDOS came about from another DDOS-for-hire site, who as it turns out was simply reselling services provided by vDOS. They were far from the only one. vDOS appeared to provide firepower to a large number of different resellers.
In addition to the attack logs, support messages were also among the data stolen. This contained some complaints from various clients who complained they were unable to launch attacks against Israeli IPs. This is a common tactic by hackers to try and avoid unwanted attention from authorities in their country of residence. This was confirmed when two men from Israel were arrested for their involvement in owning and running vDOS. However, this was just the beginning for this bit of drama.
The two men arrested went by the handles "applej4ck" and "Raziel". They had recently published a paper on DDOS attack methods in an online Israeli security magazine. Interestingly, on the same day the men were arrested, questioned, and released on bail, vDOS went offline. Not because it had been taken down by Israeli authorities, not because they had shut it down themselves, but because a DDOS protection firm, BackConnect Security, had hijacked the IP addresses belonging to the company. To spare a lot of technical detail, it's called a BGP hijack, and it basically works by a company saying "Yeah, those are our addresses." It's kind of amazing how much of the internet is basically just secured by the digital equivalent of pinky swears. You can read some more technical detail on Wikipedia. Anyway, we'll get back to BackConnect.
Following the publication of the story uncovering the inner workings of vDOS, KrebsOnSecurity was hit with a record breaking DDOS attack, that peaked at 620/Gbps, nearly double the most powerful DDOS attack previously on record. To put that in perspective, that's enough bandwidth to download 5 simultaneous copies of Interstellar in 4K resolution every single second, and still have room to spare. The attack was so devastating, Akamai, one of the largest providers of DDOS protection in the world had to drop Krebs as a pro bono client. Luckily, Google was willing to step in and place his site under the protection of Google's Project Shield, a free service designed to protect the news sites and journalists from being knocked offline by DDOS attacks.
This attack was apparently in retaliation for the vDOS story, since some of the data sent in the attack included the string "freeapplej4ck". The attack was executed by a botnet of Internet of Things (or IoT) devices. These are those "smart" devices like camera systems, routers, DVRs. Basically things that connect to the cloud. An astounding amount of those are secured with default passwords that can be easily looked up from various sites or even the manufacturers' websites. This was the start of a discovery of a massive botnet that had been growing for years.
Now time for a couple quick side stories:
Dyn, a company who provides DNS to many major companies including Twitter, Reddit, and others came under attack, leaving many sites (including Twitter and Reddit) faltering in the wake of it. Potentially due to one of their engineers' collaboration with Krebs on another story. It turned out that the same botnet that attacked Krebs' site was at least part of the attack on Dyn
And back to BackConnect, that DDOS protection firm that hijacked the IP addresses from vDOS. Well it turns out BGP Hijacks are old hat for the company. They had done it at least 17 times before. Including at least once (purportedly with permission) for the address 1.3.3.7. Aka, "leet". It turns out one of the co-founders of BackConnect actually posted screenshots of him visiting sites that tell you your public IP address in a DDOS mitigation industry chat, showing it as 1.3.3.7. They also used a BGP Hijack against a hosting company and tried to frame a rival DDOS mitigation provider.
Finally, another provider, Datawagon was interestingly implicated in hosting DDOS-for-hire sites while offering DDOS protection. In a Skype conversation where the founder of Datawagon wanted to talk about that time he registered dominos.pizza and got sued for it, he brings up scanning the internet for vulnerable routers completely unprompted. Following the publication of the story about BackConnect, in which he was included in, he was incensed about his portrayal, and argued with Krebs over Skype before Krebs ultimately ended up blocking him. He was subsequently flooded with fake contact requests from bogus or hacked Skype accounts. Shortly thereafter, the record-breaking DDOS attack rained down upon his site.
Back to the main tale!
So, it turns out the botnet of IoT devices was puppeteered by a malware called Mirai. How did it get its name? Well, that's the name its creator gave it, after an anime called Mirai Nikki. How did this name come to light? The creator posted the source code online. (The name part, not the origin. The origin didn't come 'til later.) The post purported that they'd picked it up from somewhere in their travels as a DDOS industry professional. It turns out this is a semi-common tactic when miscreants fear that law enforcement might come looking for them, and having the only copy of the source code of a malware in existence is a pretty strong indicator that you have something to do with it. So, releasing the source to the world gives a veneer of plausible deniability should that eventuality come to pass. So who was this mysterious benefactor of malware source? They went by the name "Anna-senpai".
As research on the Mirai botnet grew, and more malware authors incorporated parts of Mirai's source code into their own attacks, attention on the botnet increased, and on the people behind it. The attention was presumably the reason why Hackforums, the forum where the source code was posted, later disallowed ostensible "Server Stress Tester" services from being sold on it. By December, "Operation Tarpit" had wrought 34 arrests and over a hundred "knock and talk" interviews questioning people about their involvement.
By January, things started to come crashing down. Krebs published an extensive exposé on Anna-senpai detailing all the evidence linking them to the creation of Mirai. The post was so big, he included a damn glossary. What sparked the largest botnet the internet had ever seen? Minecraft. Minecraft servers are big business. A popular one can earn tens of thousands of dollars per month from people buying powers, building space, or other things. It's also a fiercely competitive business, with hundreds of servers vying for players. It turns out that things may have started, as with another set of companies, two rival DDOS mitigation providers competing for customers. ProTraf was a provider of such mitigation technology, and a company whose owner later worked for ProTraf had on at least one occasion hijacked addresses belonging to another company, ProxyPipe. ProxyPipe had also been hit with DDOS attacks they suspected to be launched by ProTraf.
While looking into the President of ProTraf, Krebs realized he'd seen the relatively uncommon combination of programming languages and skills posted by the President somewhere else. They were shared by Anna-senpai on Hackforums. As Krebs dug deeper and deeper into Anna-senpai's online presence, he uncovered other usernames, including one he traced to some Minecraft forums where a photoshopped picture of a still from Pulp Fiction contained the faces of BackConnect, which was a rival to ProTraf's DDOS mitigation business, and another face. A hacker by the name of Vyp0r, who another employee of ProTraf claimed betrayed his trust and blackmailed him into posting the source of another piece of malware called Bashlite. There was also a third character photoshopped into the image. An anime character named "Yamada" from a movie called B Gata H Hei.
Interestingly, under the same username, Krebs found a "MyAnimeList" profile which, out of 9 titles it had marked as watched, were B Gata H Hei, as well as Mirai Nikki, the show from which Mirai derived its name. It continues on with other evidence, including DDOS attacks against Rutgers University, but in short, there was little doubt in the identity of "Anna-senpai", but the person behind the identity did contact Krebs to comment. He denied any involvement in Mirai or DDOS attacks.
"I don’t think there are enough facts to definitively point the finger at me," [Anna-senpai] said. "Besides this article, I was pretty much a nobody. No history of doing this kind of stuff, nothing that points to any kind of sociopathic behavior. Which is what the author is, a sociopath."
He did, however, correct Krebs on the name of B Gata H Kei.
Epilogue
Needless to say, the Mirai botnet crew was caught, but managed to avoid jailtime thanks to their cooperation with the government. That's not to say they went unpunished. Anna-senpai was sentenced to 6 months confinement, 2500 hours of community service, and they may have to pay up to $8.6 million in restitution for their attacks on Rutgers university.

Other Stories

I don't have the time or energy to write another effortpost, and as is I'm over 20,000 characters, so here's a few other tidbits of Krebs' clashes with miscreants.
submitted by HereComesMyDingDong to internetdrama [link] [comments]

Payment options for Canadian performers and sellers

So this question comes up a lot and I thought it was worth making a separate post about it to try and get all the information in one place. While there are many great resources on the various camming and selling subreddits regarding payment options, none of them are specific to Canadian sellers as far as I know. Please make sure you familiarize yourself with those, though, because they have information about the safety of your money and your identity/privacy when using each service.
Transparency Statement
Apps and services I have personally used will be indicated within. I also want to note that I was given a $10 Polyalpha gift card by a fellow Redditor and seller for a chance to try the service (it was a public offer given in a comment thread). I do not anticipate bias because of this, but it has given me information about the service that I would not have otherwise had.
Disclaimer
This post is for information purposes only and nothing I say should be construed as an endorsement. Similarly, the focus of this post is on payment options for Canadian models. There are a lot more things to consider as you do your research, so please keep in mind that this is not intended to be a comprehensive resource and take the time to double-check how each works when it comes to personal safety and anonymity in particular.
I have broken this down into two tables – one for third-party apps that Canadians can use to receive direct payment from individual buyers, and one that gives the lowdown on getting paid from various content/cam sites. Note that many of the options in Table 2 are also payment processors or can be used as such.
Table 1. Third-party apps for receiving direct payment.
>>Options in bold require that you have a US-based checking account<< See next section for more information.

Service Currency options for receiving payment Payment options for buyers Withdrawal procedure Fees Notes Source
Paxum EUR, GBP, USD Must have Paxum Prepaid card; to US bank account $0.25/transaction Poor quality info online; nonexistent customer service Personal experience and http://bit.ly/2moKymk
Shakepay Bitcoin, Ethereum BTC, ETH, PolyAlpha Convert to CAD within the app and etransfer it to yourself None from Shakepay but may be bank fees By far the most painless sign-up experience I've had -Personal experience and http://bit.ly/2nfLSYU
Payza 24 others besides CAD Must have Payza; can load from debit or CC Convert to CAD in-app -> bank transfer, Payza card, or BTC http://bit.ly/2ndxIr7 Free I have not used this - all info from website http://bit.ly/2lKVHO7
eTransfer CAD CAD via email or text None required Varies by bank and account type Only safe option here is to use a dedicated and separate email. I don't know if it would work using a number from Burner or Text Plus Personal experience: When you receive money, the name associated with your bank acct isn't visible to the sender
PolyAlpha Bitcoin via gift voucher USD using PayPal or CashApp (see notes) Bitcoin wallet Currently around 18% and decreasing a) I used Shakepay to receive BTC because it can convert to CAD in-app Personal experience, Reddit, and http://bit.ly/2lItcAr (scroll to bottom -> Gift Vouchers -> "buy" or "redeem")
GiftRocket USD USD or merchant gift card via CC Direct deposit to US account; gift card Buyer pays $2 + 5% of value a) I have not used this – all info from website b) Gift cards avail. for specific places – see website http://bit.ly/2nh8kRk
Table 1 Notes
Opening a US Checking Account
To my knowledge, TD and RBC are the only banks where this is possible. In order to take advantage of the payment options I’ve identified in bold in Table 1 and Table 2, it is imperative that you open a US-based checking account and not just a USD account through your home branch. The difference is that a US-based checking account is tied to a branch that has a physical location in the US.
I opened mine through RBC and it was relatively painless. I opened a Canadian checking account online but had to go to a branch to provide ID verification. This is required in order to open the US account. Next I called them to open the US-based account. You can do this at any branch as well, but I was told that it takes longer to open this way. Over the phone, it was instant. My accounts are linked through my online banking portal and RBC banking app, allowing me to transfer myself money easily and instantly. They also sent me a Visa Debit for my US account, which took about two weeks to arrive.
Table 2. Payment methods for Canadian sellers and performers on various cam/content sites.
I have omitted all instances of wire transfers (because they are slow, expensive, and usually have high payout minimums) and all instances of cheques (because they are slow). I have omitted all mention of ePayments because they no longer accept payments in USD.

Site Direct deposit in CAD? Direct deposit to US account? Other payment options Source
Chaturbate No Yes Paxum http://bit.ly/2mtHVQb
My Free Cams No Yes Paxum, Payoneer http://bit.ly/2njg59w
Bonga Cams No Yes Paxum, Crypto (five different ones) http://bit.ly/2o14X1h
Streamate No Yes Paxum, Payoneer http://bit.ly/2o2YnaJ
Stripchat No Yes Paxum http://bit.ly/2npjfZ4
CamSoda No Yes Paxum http://bit.ly/2lLqREU
IndieBill No Yes None http://bit.ly/2nmFpv8
ManyVids Yes - $30 fee but FREE to deposit to Canadian USD account Yes Paxum http://bit.ly/2o36d49
OnlyFans No Yes Paxum Via email b/c info is only available to registered account holders
Clips4Sale No Yes None http://bit.ly/2o1pgvy
iwantclips No Yes None http://bit.ly/2my24V8
Table 2 notes
TL;DR Get a US-based bank account, Paxum, and Shakepay.
I am open to questions, comments, and concerns! I would like this resource to be as tight as possible so be sure to let me know if you see any issues or gaps.
submitted by heidivonrocket to CamGirlProblems [link] [comments]

The real reason Bitcoin is skyrocketing and why CME is launching Bitcoin futures on Dec 18, 2017. Someone is close to building a real quantum computer.

We will soon see someone become the fastest trillionaire in history. Why you ask? Because Quantum Computing can defeat Bitcoin's SHA256 blockchains. http://www.newsweek.com/quantum-computers-kill-bitcoin-cryptocurrency-509053
The reason we place so much trust in Bitcoins is because right now, it would take a typical PC 3.17*1064 years to brute force a wallet. This pretty much translates into never. But quantum computing changes the game. Soon, due to quantum computers, 256bit encryption schemes will become easily crackable.
Enter, the CME Bitcoin futures.
For those who don't know how futures work, it's just a contract to purchase something at an agreed price at an agreed date. Say you own 1 bitcoin. I go to you and say, I'll buy that bitcoin off of you in 1 month for $15K. If you think bitcoins will be priced less than $15k after a month, then you would agree to the contract with me, right? So we make the deal. If bitcoins are worth $10,000 next month, I'm out $5,000 because I still have to pay you $15,000 for the bitcoin. On the other hand, if bitcoins are worth $20,000, you lose $5,000. Because you still have to sell me that bitcoin for $15,000. Fair enough?
Okay, now here's the part that gets tricky. The thing is, YOU don't have to actually have a bitcoin to make this contract with me. So what would that look like? Say you agree to sell me 1 bitcoin in 1 month at $15,000. Let's say the price of bitcoins at that date is $10,000. You just made $5k in profit. Why? Because you just have to go on the web, buy a bitcoin at $10k and sell it to me for $15k. Bam. $5K profit. On the other hand, say the current market price of bitcoins are $20k. Well, now you are out $5,000. You have to go to the web and buy a bitcoin for $20k and sell it to me for $15k. Loss of $5,000. Congratulations. You now know what "shorting the futures market" means. It's simply selling something you don't own in the hopes that prices will be cheaper when you actually have to deliver.
Alright, now we know how futures work. So what's this got to do with the real bitcoin market?
We've all seen the dramatic rise in the value of bitcoin this year. It's astronomical. Why is this happening? There are literally 100 reasons people will give you for why this is happening. And the truth is, all of them are plausible. But here's what I think. I think someone, or some govt, is driving up prices for a specific reason. To short the bitcoin market using futures.
What makes bitcoins secure? What makes your wallet that you have on your harddrive or USB drive secure? SHA256 bit encryption. The specifics of this encryption is beyond the scope of this post but suffice to say that it would take a long ass time to try to bruteforce guess the password. What would happen if that password could be broken in a matter of week? Simple. Every blockchain currency, as well as all passwords you use, will become crackable. Now, most servers, such as your bank's or your business, have a safeguard against this. They only allow something like 5 attempts to be made before they let you try again. But what about bitcoins? Umm,.... nope. You can bruteforce attack bitcoin wallets as much as you'd like simply because bitcoin wallets don't exist on your computer. It exists in the ledger which everyone has access to. You only have the password that allows you access to that particular entry on the ledger that proves that you have such and such amount of bitcoins.
So, if you develop a computer that can crack SHA256 encryption in a matter of weeks, how would you use that to make money? Simple. Short the hell out of bitcoin futures. Then release the news that you have a computer that's able to crack SHA256. Bam. The value of bitcoin goes to ZERO. No, I'm not exaggerating. The value will literally go to zero. You just made more money than anyone in history in the shortest amount of time.
Now, this isn't all speculation. You can prove me wrong by observing the price of the CME futures over time once it starts trading. Selling large amounts of futures will drive the price of the futures down and they will trade below market price (current price). So, even tho 90% of the people think the price of Bitcoins will go up, it could trade at prices lower than the current market price. This will mean that there is a huge seller of this futures. It will prove my point.
However, this is not what's going to happen. The futures price will trade at a significant premium (meaning higher than current market prices). Why? Because they're gonna drive this sucker to the max. They're gonna make it go all the way up to $100k while the Quantum Computer is finalized. Then, they will unleash the greatest trade ever known to man. A trade that makes Soros' shorting of the GBP look like child play.
submitted by psy_raven to conspiracy [link] [comments]

A sketchy scammer held their side of a crypto <> fiat trade hostage causing missed bills and late payment charges. Can I reclaim losses?

TL;DR: I filled my part of a monetary trade, the other party has not. He is holding £2.4k hostage due to a problem that is no fault of mine. I'm behind on bills and have late fees to pay. Can I take him on legally to reclaim losses and damages?

I get paid in bitcoin (not the discussion here), so every month I trade that BTC into GBP. I'm not a trader- I don't manipulate the market or whatever, I just find a seller with good reviews on localbitcoins.com and do a bank transfer trade.

Typically, this means that the other party makes a direct transfer into my bank account, then I release escrowed BTC to their account. Simple. This buyer had some different terms though. They sent a confirmation that the transfer had been started, and I released the escrow as per their instructions (**For crypto-minded people: Yes, I know I made a huge mistake releasing escrow first. I have learned from this mistake and will not make it again.**). All seemed well, except lo and behold the transfer didn't arrive that day.

Basically, what happened is that the buyer had put the transfer on hold because his localbitcoins account had been frozen after our trade. It's important to note here that my account was not frozen or limited in any way at this point. The buyer blamed me that his account was locked, and said he wouldn't make the bank transfer until his account was unlocked.

We both contacted support asking what was up, and I advised being out of pocket. **At this point the bitcoins are in his localbitcoins account but he cannot access them. I am not in possession of them nor do I have any control of them.**

Anyway, basically the buyer held his stance, no money until his account was unlocked. He blamed me, saying I must be a suspicious trader. There's no proof of this, especially because my account has remained in good standing throughout.

He twisted my arm, pulled my leg and in the end support told him that his account would remain locked until I confirmed the transfer. Once again, he sent me a transfer receipt from his bank. The money never arrived once again, and I'm sweating at this point. It's a week later and bills are due.

I messaged the buyer a metric ton that week, asking what was going on, where's the money, etc. but got no reply between Sunday and Wednesday. At this point I think I've been scammed. I report his account and leave a negative review warning other traders off. His account is subsequently banned until localbitcoins support investigates. The next week, on Tuesday, the buyer blows up at me on whatsapp about how he was on holiday, had no data, etc., how I've ruined his account (that had 4 years of positive, 100% feedback) with my review. He tells me that he cancelled the transfer again because of this and that he would not talk to me any more.

I told him again, if he transfers the funds, I will remove my review and tell localbitcoins support that our dispute is over. As a sign of good will, I took my review down already.

To be clear: I don't think this guy is a scammer. He has 4 years of legitimate trades at good prices and a legit website too. I do, however, think he's a dickhead that has caused me a month of incredible emotional pain, stress and anxiety.

Right now I'm still out £2.4k which never reached my account. The bitcoin is still in the buyer's account, albeit locked. It's likely that the support team will get it back for me, unless the buyer decides to make the bank transfer. It's worth noting that due to the bitcoin price going up, the buyer would make about £400+ on the price he bought from me for. I don't care much, I just want my salary. The point is it's in his interest to resolve this issue and take advantage of the higher price.

So, currently localbitcoins is investigating, which will likely end up in a resolution in my favour since the user cannot furnish evidence that he ever completed the bank transfer. I'm confident that one way or the other it will be resolved.

The issue is that this money is my paycheck. I live on it, pay taxes with it, pay my rent and bills with it, and this whole scenario has mean missed bills and late fees, over £400 and counting until I finally get paid. What I want here is retribution and justice. The buyer, through no fault of mine, has played judge and jury with his side of the trade. I fulfilled mine and this is documented and confirmed. He never fulfilled his. I want him to pay all my late fees, catch me up on my missed bills and pay additionally for increase in value since our trade. And yeah, I'll be that guy and say I want emotional trauma damages too.

Do you think this is something I would have a chance with in court, maybe small claims or bigger? If it was a car, this would never fly. I know crypto is a bit of a minefield but I feel this situation is pretty clearly in my favour. I am located in England, Seller is in Scotland. I have his full name and bank account details.
submitted by worldsworstluck2019 to LegalAdviceUK [link] [comments]

u/guysir was getting downvoted in this thread for constantly asking "Can you explain why someone would have the desire for Bitcoin to die?" So I put together a couple of pointers to help him (and others like him) to wake up and smell the coffee.

TL;DR:
If you just want a 3-minute (NSFW) video which explains why certain rich assholes don't want you to have nice things, here goes:
George Carlin - The big club (NSFW!!!)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cKUaqFzZLxU
Reference:
u/guysir has been asking a lot of questions like this:
Can you explain why [they] would have the desire for Bitcoin to die?
Edit: I like how I'm being downvoted for simply asking a question.
~ u/guysir
https://np.reddit.com/btc/comments/6qjw0o/small_blockers_want_even_smaller_blocks_o_o/dkxz7t3/?context=2
etc etc etc...
Below are some introductory lessons to help u/guysir grow up and face the reality of how the world actually works.
Lesson 1: Money doesn't grow on trees. Nor does it get mined from the ground very much anymore, as gold and silver. (Correction because I was half-asleep when I wrote that: Gold and silver still do get mined quite a bit of course - but most people don't use them day-to-day as money.) And gold and silver prices are probably heavily manipulated (suppressed) these days anyways - in order to prevent the value of fiat currencies (such as the USD, EUR, GBP, YEN) from collapsing.
So, where does money come from, in the modern world?
Bankers print unlimited supplies of money out of thin air (which they then give to their buddies).
That may sound somewhat surprising to someone who hasn't ever sat down and examined how the world actually works - but basically, it's the reality we do live in.
Exercise 1: Put on your thinking cap now for 30 seconds and try to imagine what your life would be like if you could "print money out of thin air" (and give it to your buddies).
OK, your 30 seconds are up.
Hopefully you realized that being able to "print money out of thin air" (and give it to your buddies) would give you immense power - correct?
This was just a simple exercise, and of course the politics and economics of the world as a whole are much more complicated - but hopefully at this point you have managed to finally grasp one basic concept:
The ability to print money (and give it to your buddies) confers great power.
So, as the saying goes: "Money makes the world go around."
And some lucky people (bankers) have arrogated to themselves the right to print money (which they then give to their buddies).
These buddies of theirs constitute a kind of exclusive club of mega-rich people who control all the essentials which you need to survive: mainly housing, education, healthcare.
Notice how the prices of these essentials are always going through the roof - while your salary stays pretty much stagnant.
And notice how you never have enough cash to buy these things outright using the little bit of cash money that you actually have.
So these people also control one other thing you need in life - credit.
Credit is actually just "money that you have to buy" (at a gigantic markup, called "interest") from those same mega-rich people in that "club", who happen to be lucky enough to be buddies with the bankers who "print up money out of thin air".
It's a very exclusive club, which runs the world - and you ain't in it.
Extracurricular Activity 1: Watch this short video by George Carlin for a vivid explanation of this "club" which you ain't in:
George Carlin - The big club (NSFW!!!)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cKUaqFzZLxU
Lesson 2: Bitcoin is "peer-to-peer electronic cash". One of the most important aspects of it is that there will only be 21 million bitcoins (or 21 trillion "bits" - where there are a million "bits" in 1 bitcoin).
Many people believe that one of the main reasons Satoshi designed Bitcoin this way (with a cap of 21 million bitcoins) was to take away the power of the bankers and their buddies to keep running the world by printing up money.
Exercise 2: Read as much as you can of the Bitcoin whitepaper, and the Bitcoin wiki. Since this is about economics, you can skip over the technical stuff about how this whole thing was programmed in C++ - and just focus on how it works at the level of economics.
https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Main_Page
https://www.bitcoin.com/bitcoin.pdf
Another good site to read about the economic aspects of Bitcoin is Nakamoto Institute:
http://nakamotoinstitute.org/
Again, you can skip the articles about C++ programming - and just focus on articles dealing with the economic (and social, and political) aspects of having a form of money which an exclusive club of rich bankers and their buddies can't simply print up and use to control your life.
Extracurricular Activity 2: Read (or watch a video) about The Creature from Jekyll Island or about the Federal Reserve - which explains how the current banking system in a powerful country (the USA) really works:
https://duckduckgo.com/?q=creature+jekyll+island&t=hb&ia=web
https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=crature+from+jekyll+island
https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=federal+reserve+conspiracy
Or, alternatively, read up on topics like the petrodollar, quantitative easing, fractional reserve, ZIRP and NIRP, the Austrian school of economics - to start understanding some of the more advanced topics of how a certain exclusive club of bankers arrogate to themselves the right to print money out of thin air (which they then hand out to their buddies, who then use this power to control your access to all the expensive essentials in life).
Yes, there's a lot of tinfoil or Illuminati stuff in there which could be just delusional paranoia - but there's also a lot of cold hard facts about where money comes from. And it doesn't come from trees - or out of the ground - instead, it just comes from bankers typing in numbers on a keyboard, and then handing out this freshly-printed money to their friends - who then use this "fiat" to control you.
Lesson 3: Do a search on this subreddit for "AXA" to learn more about this one particular company.
https://np.reddit.com/btc/search?q=axa&restrict_sr=on&sort=relevance&t=all
You will see that AXA isn't just any old insurance company or financial firm - it actually happens to be the second-most-connected financial company in the world.
Who owns the world? (1) Barclays, (2) AXA, (3) State Street Bank. (Infographic in German - but you can understand it without knowing much German: "Wem gehört die Welt?" = "Who owns the world?") AXA is the #2 company with the most economic poweconnections in the world. And AXA owns Blockstream.
https://np.reddit.com/btc/comments/5btu02/who_owns_the_world_1_barclays_2_axa_3_state/
In addition, AXA is heavily involved in derivatives - in fact, it is the insurance company most heavily involved with derivatives:
If Bitcoin becomes a major currency, then tens of trillions of dollars on the "legacy ledger of fantasy fiat" will evaporate, destroying AXA, whose CEO is head of the Bilderbergers. This is the real reason why AXA bought Blockstream: to artificially suppress Bitcoin volume and price with 1MB blocks.
https://np.reddit.com/btc/comments/4r2pw5/if_bitcoin_becomes_a_major_currency_then_tens_of/?ref=search_posts
Lesson 4: How do debt-based fiat currencies (and derivatives) work? And how could companies that depend on such "assets" (such as AXA) be negatively affected by Bitcoin?
Derivatives are basically the total opposite of Bitcoin, when it comes to something called "counterparty risk" .
Counterparty risk is the possibility that you might not get what's owed to you - because "your money" isn't actually in your hands, it's in someone else's hands, and all you have is a "claim" on what they're holding in their hands: in other words, they have a debt to you (a promise to pay you) - and you only get "your" money if that other "counterparty" actually pays their debt to you, or makes good on their promise to pay you.
Compare that to Bitcoin - which is basically one of the only "counterparty-free" assets in the world. If you have a bitcoin (ie, if you control your own private key), then you're not dependent on anybody to pay you. You already are holding your own "cash".
You've probably seen company balance sheets, with Assets (including Receivables) and Liabilities (including Payables) and Income and Expenses and Equity. To calculate how much the company "has", you just add up all the positive stuff (Assets and Receivables), then subtract all the negative stuff (Liabilities and Payables), and the difference is what the company "has": its Equity. (The Income and Expense accounts are just temporary accounts used for incoming and outgoing cash flows.) But a lot of what the company "has" also could involve "counterparties" - other entities who (in the future) will (hopefully) come through and pay what they promised to pay.
So there is risk here. Risk of not getting paid. Risk of breach of contract. Risk of credit default. Because most of these "assets" are not "counterparty-free". Your "net worth" on paper might be just that: on paper. In reality (if the people who promised to pay you end up never paying you), then your "net worth" could actually turn out to be much less than what it says "on paper".
Derivatives are just another layer built on top of that: they're basically "bets" about whether someone is actually going to get paid or not. (In fact, one of the most important types of derivatives are Credit Default Swaps - or CDOs - which are used to place "bets" on whether someone is going to default on their debts.)
So, a company like AXA (which is heavily involved in derivativs) is technically "rich" - but only "on paper". In reality, like most major financial firms, if you just looked at what they actually have "on hand", they'd probably literally be bankrupt.
This may sound shocking, but many economic experts have stated that a majority of the major financial firms around the world (including most major banks, and most major insurance firms such as AXA) are actually bankrupt - if you just look at the reality of what they actually have "on hand" (and not the "fantasy" of what they have "on paper").
So, in addition to the ability to print money out of thin air, there is this other strange aspect to the world's current financial system: many companies (mainly finance companies) would be considered bankrupt if viewed strictly in terms of what they have "on hand" ... but they're are able to parade around acting like they're mega-rich, based on what they have "on paper" (most of which is debt-based or derivatives-based).
Bitcoin coin is a major threat to the existing power system based on debt and dervatives - which AXA is at the absolute center of
So, the people who are supposedly "powerful", who run our world - their power comes from two sources:
  • Their ability to print up money out of thin air;
  • Debt-based and derivatives-based numbers on paper.
Bitcoin threatens the first item above.
And the global financial crisis which started in 2008 threatens the second item above.
In fact, Bitcoin itself also probably threatens the second item above too.
This is because as Bitcoin becomes worth more and more, those debt-based and derivatives-based numbers on paper become worth less and less, in relative terms.
And if the current financial crisis becomes acute again (like it did when another "systemically important" insurance company / derivatives "playa" went under: AIG)...
...then a lot of those numbers on balance sheets will get wiped out, written off - because people aren't paying up
...and so companies (including companies like AXA - in fact especially companies like AXA) might go belly up
...because they don't actually have any real money "on hand" - all they have is debt-based and derivatives-based numbers on paper.
So nearly all of the world's major banks and insurance companies - especially AXA - are on a mad, mad merry-go-round of debt and derivatives.
They're like someone with no cash, living on an almost-maxxed-out credit card - desperately hoping that the banks will lend give them more money (a/k/a "credit" - a/k/a debt), and terrified that the counterparties who owe them money will actually turn out to be in the same boat that they are: ie, bankrupt, deadbeats.
It's actually less like a merry-go-round, and more like a game of musical chairs: and nearly all the major banks and financial companies are terrified of what will happen if/when the music stops, and they're not able to scramble to find a chair - especially AXA.
AXA is the "second-most-connected" financial company in the world
AXA also has more derivatives than any other insurance company in the world - which means they're basically flat-broke, totally dependent on their "counterparties" in this "web of debt".
And derivatives aren't just some minor part of the world financial system. Actually, there is currently around 1.2 quadrillion dollars in derivatives - so derivatives are by far the biggest part of the world financial system.
Here's an infographic to give you an idea:
http://money.visualcapitalist.com/all-of-the-worlds-money-and-markets-in-one-visualization/
You'll notice that Bitcoin is also included on that infographic.
Maybe you look at it and think: Well, Bitcoin is so small, why would they be worried about it?
But size isn't everything.
Remember that (unlike nearly every other asset on that infographic) - bitcoin is "counterparty-free". (Also gold and silver are "counterparty-free".)
So gold, silver and bitcoin are a lot more "independent" than all the other so-called "assets" on that infographic. In fact, it wouldn't be much of a stretch to say that gold, silver and bitcoin are the only totally real assets on that infographic - and the rest of those assets are to some degree fake (since they could evaporate at any minute - unlike gold, silver and bitcoin, where your ownership is totally guaranteed).
Also, due to the "law of reversion to mean", something small on that infographic basically has only one direction it can go: towards getting bigger. We say that Bitcoin has a lot of "upside" for growth.
And something gigantic on that infographic also has one direction it can go: towards getting smaller. We say that derivatives have a lot of downside - derivatives might be in a bubble, or due for a crash.
And one way that could easily happen would be for billions of dollars (or trillions of dollars) to flow into Bitcoin - while flowing out of the other asset classes on that infographic.
Of course, in order for trillions of dollars to flow into Bitcoin...
We're gonna need a bigger blocksize.
And that's actually basically all we'd probably need - the software already runs fine, and (despite the propaganda from Blockstream and r\bitcoin), the network / hardware / infrastructure / bandwidth can already handle blocksizes of 4MB-8MB - so with things like Moore's law working in tandem with Metcalfe's law, it is quite reaonable to assume that in 8-10 years (after the next two Bitcoin "halvings") it is quite possible for 1 bitcoin to be worth 1 million US Dollars.
I did some rough growth projections here showing how feasible this actually is:
Bitcoin Original: Reinstate Satoshi's original 32MB max blocksize. If actual blocks grow 54% per year (and price grows 1.542 = 2.37x per year - Metcalfe's Law), then in 8 years we'd have 32MB blocks, 100 txns/sec, 1 BTC = 1 million USD - 100% on-chain P2P cash, without SegWit/Lightning or Unlimited
https://np.reddit.com/btc/comments/5uljaf/bitcoin_original_reinstate_satoshis_original_32mb/
So Bitcoin (with bigger blocks - not under the control of Blockstream or AXA) could be a serious competitor - or a threat - or a safe haven - or an "inversely correlated" asset class - versus all the other asset classes on that infographic.
Bitcoin is an alternative
Bitcoin is an alternative - an option people might turn to, if they decide to abandon the other options on that infographic.
So AXA - whose wealth and power depends on heavily on the derivatives shown in that infographic - might want to either see Bitcoin fail, or suppress Bitcoin, or eliminate it as an alternative, or simply control it somehow - just to make sure it doesn't "eat their lunch".
Remember that one of the tactics used by oppressors is to spread propaganda to brainwash you into giving up hope and believing that "There Is No Alternative".
Bitcoin is an alternative to the current messed-up financial system (which helps prop up bankrupt companies like AXA) - so for that reason alone it's enough for a company like AXA to want to eliminate or suppress or at least control Bitcoin. Not just by buying up some bitcoins - but by paying the devs who write the code that determines the blocksize which ultimately affects the price.
"Bitcoin users unaffected."
If/when the music stops in the game of debt- and derivatives-backed musical chairs that makes the world go 'round, some of the "systemically important" financial firms will be exposed as being bankrupt - and it is very, very likely that one of those firms could be AXA (just like AIG in 2008).
In all honesty, I have to admit that it's still not totally clear to me (or maybe to anyone) precisely how Bitcoin will ultimately impact this whole "web of debt". After all, this is the first time the world has ever had a digital, counterparty-free asset like Bitcoin. (Gold and silver are also counterparty-free - but they're not digital, so it's harder to store them and move them around.)
But one basic fact is certain: Bitcoin is really not a part of this whole "web of debt". Bitcoin stands quite outside this whole "web of debt". Bitcoin is "inversely correlated" to this whole "web of debt".
Bitcoin is an alternative.
Voice and Exit
If you feel like you don't have a voice / vote in the system, it's good to know that you can exit the system.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Exit,_Voice,_and_Loyalty
Balaji Srinivasan (founder of 21.co) on Voice and Exit
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cOubCHLXT6A
Can we ever really know what AXA might be up to with Bitcoin?
Probably not - because it is unlikely that they would ever tell us.
But, we can make some rational guesses.
On some level, a lot of people whose wealth and power come from this whole "web of debt" are probably just reasoning as follows:
  • If/when this whole "web of debt" goes down, Bitcoin goes up. (This is already pretty much an established fact: money flees to "safe havens" like gold, silver and bitcoin when "traditional" investments go down.)
  • If/when Bitcoin goes up, then the importance and power (and credibility) of this whole "web of debt" goes down. (This makes sense: being counterparty-free, bitcoin is obviously a safer investment - and so it's worth more - and so all those other debt-based and derivatives-based investments become worth less, as bitcoin becomes worth more.)
  • If Bitcoin goes down (or totally goes away), then this whole "web of debt" will probably be able to hang on for a while longer. (This also be more of just just a conjecture - but it seems quite reasonable.)
Maybe they just want to keep you trapped in their system - by destroying (or suppressing) the alternative (Bitcoin) which gives you a chance to exit their system.
Some more posts about AXA and what they might be up to:
Anyways, there's a bunch of articles on btc about AXA and what they might be up to with Bitcoin:
https://np.reddit.com/btc/search?q=axa&restrict_sr=on
Finally, if you need some extra help dispelling the quaint notion that the people who run the world are honest and transparent and helpful, then the following two (admittedly highly conjectural) posts might help spell things out a bit more explicitly for you:
Blockstream may be just another Embrace-Extend-Extinguish strategy.
https://np.reddit.com/btc/comments/3y8o9c/is_the_real_power_behind_blockstream_straussian/
The owners of Blockstream are spending $75 million to do a "controlled demolition" of Bitcoin by manipulating the Core devs & the Chinese miners. This is cheap compared to the $ trillions spent on the wars on Iraq & Libya - who also defied the Fed / PetroDollar / BIS private central banking cartel.
https://np.reddit.com/btc/comments/48vhn0/the_owners_of_blockstream_are_spending_75_million/
Sorry I don't have any more time right now to "school" you further on this subject.
Ideally, learning should be a self-driven process anyways - once someone helps you get started.
Some advice
Finally, if I may give you some parting advice.
If you want to be truly respected on these forums, you're probably going to have to stop going around acting like such a doe-eyed innocent little pollyanna.
It is assumed that most people here already pretty much know the harsh reality of how the world works, and are trying to use Bitcoin as a way to not get screwed over by this harsh reality.
So some of the more informed people around here might not have much patience with you (or trust in you) if you don't even understand the basic principles outlined above, namely:
  1. Our planet is being run by an exclusive club of rich assholes who have immense power, because we "allow" them to print out money (which they then hand out to their buddies, not to us - basically enslaving us).
  2. Bitcoin was designed (many believe) to help fix this dire situation.
  3. The ancien régime (those people who up till now who have been running the world, due to their ability to print money) might not like Bitcoin for this reason, and might try to do something to stop it - and they might not tell you why they're doing it - and they might not even tell you that they are doing it in the first place!
Sorry to be such a curmudgeon, but pollyannas like you tend to get on my nerves after a while - not least because it seems to me that one of the factors which allows those rich assholes to continue to stay in power and run the world is because so many uninformed credulous people like you either can't or won't just wake up and open your goddamn eyes and see how you're getting fucked over by this whole "web of debt" based around that exclusive "club" of rich assholes who get free money which the bankers are simply printing up out of thin air.
So, 99% of people in the world are living lives of quiet desperation and oppression, becoming poorer and poorer - while the rich keep getting richer and richer (with all that money they keep printing out of thin air - which by the way, if you do the math, ends up making your money worth less) - and now there are finally some serious attempts at revolution or change afoot, to try to fix some of this mess - and you've just wandered in to a meeting where some of these people struggling for change are making plans, and you basically keep going around asking "What are you guys so worked up about?"
Maybe if you also realized that you are saying the exact same thing that the oppressors are always saying (basically some variation of "Nothing to see here, move on!") - then maybe that will provide another hint to you as to why some people have been less-than-totally-welcoming of your non-stop naïve-sounding questions.
Every subreddit has a topic - plus certain assumptions
For comparison: Would you wander around on a subreddit about fitness or weightlifting constantly asking: "Why do you want to get in shape?"? (Or maybe here's an even better comparison: Would you wander around on a subreddit for some oppressed group, and keep asking "Why would anyone be oppressing you?"?)
There are certain "givens" which are assumed on a subreddit - and one of the "givens" for a lot of people on this subreddit is that the current monetary regime running the world is not working for most people (or: it is oppressing most people), and so we need something better. (Also another one of the "givens" is that r\bitcoin is censoring everyone's posts - and that Blockstream is damaging Bitcoin.)
Nobody is forcing you to get into fitness or weightlifting - and nobody is forcing you to get into Bitcoin. Maybe you think your physique is already fine the way it is, so you don't see the point of fitness or bodybuilding - and maybe you think that VISA and PayPal and JPMorganChase and Wells Fargo and the Fed and the ECB or whatever are fine for you, so you don't see the point of Bitcoin. (Or maybe you were born a millionaire so you don't feel financially oppressed.) You're free to get involved or not get involved. Most people who are here are involved for some particular reason. And whatever that reason may be, it usually tends to involve using Bitcoin as it was designed in the whitepaper - in order to improve their lives. And part of this also means actually using Bitcoin as it was designed in the whitepaper - free of any interference from companies like Blockstream - or their financial backers AXA - who might not really want us to be able to use Bitcoin the way it was designed in the whitepaper.
In particular, it has been quite obvious for years to people on btc that the actions of r\bitcoin and Blockstream have been damaging to Bitcoin (whatever their actual motives may be - which we may ultimately never even be able to find out since they're probably never going to actually tell us) - but meanwhile we've had to fight tooth and nail to get a vast brainwashed army of pollyannas - a lot of whom quite frankly sound a lot like you - to understand that Satoshi did not design Bitcoin to work like this:
Every Core supporter wants to run their own node. Apparently to help banks settle transactions, instead of their own transactions.
https://np.reddit.com/btc/comments/6qgy7s/every_core_supporter_wants_to_run_their_own_node/
Satoshi designed Bitcoin to work like this:
Bitcoin Original: Reinstate Satoshi's original 32MB max blocksize. If actual blocks grow 54% per year (and price grows 1.542 = 2.37x per year - Metcalfe's Law), then in 8 years we'd have 32MB blocks, 100 txns/sec, 1 BTC = 1 million USD - 100% on-chain P2P cash, without SegWit/Lightning or Unlimited
https://np.reddit.com/btc/comments/5uljaf/bitcoin_original_reinstate_satoshis_original_32mb/
We all have our own reasons for being here.
So hopefully that gives you some background regarding why many people are here on this subreddit in the first place, and what some of our goals and desires are.
We want to use Bitcoin - and we don't want the bankers funding Blockstream or the censors silencing r\bitcoin to get in our way.
We understand that Bitcoin is a disruptive technology which could be liberating and empowering for many of us in various ways.
We are realistic about the fact (ie, we take it as a "given") that certain powerful individuals or institutions might not want us to be empowered and liberated like this (maybe because their power depends on our enslavement).
And so we allow for the possibility that certain powerful individuals or institutions might be trying to stop us - and that they might not even have the courtesy to inform us that they are trying to stop us.
I should of course clarify that these are ultimately really only my reasons for being on this forum.
Other people may have their own reasons - some the same as me, and some different from me - and so I can only speak for myself.
It is important for all of us - me, you and everyone else - to have a clear understanding of why we are here.
In particular, if you - u/guysir - ever felt like giving people a brief explanation of why you are here - then that might help people understand why you keep asking the kind of questions you keep asking.
Why people are rejecting Blockstream's heavily modified version of Bitcoin - and sticking with Satoshi's original version of Bitcoin (now called Bitcoin Cash or BCC)
The above reasons are why many of us will not use AXA-owned Blockstream's Bitcoin.
We want to continue using Satoshi's original Bitcoin, now being renamed Bitcoin Cash (ticker: BCC, or BCH) - because we want to continue to enjoy the benefits of:
submitted by ydtm to btc [link] [comments]

Kin: The Reader's Digest Condensed Version

We all know that Kin is a unique digital currency, that it has value and utility, and that the Kin Ecosystem, currently in development, is going to be big--very big. But let’s look back for a moment. In order to see the scope of what’s happening, and where we’re going, it might be useful to look back, at where we’ve been.
Kin was started by the good folks at KIK Messenger. As Facebook and Google grew to gargantuan proportions, it became obvious to all that the old-school model of Advertisement Placement for monetization was becoming untenable for anyone other than the biggest and most entrenched of companies. Yes, the Facebooks and Googles of the world were doing fine with monetization via advertisements, and were busily scalping data from their users in a feeding frenzy to capitalize on the one asset they could sell… those users’ attention.
While most users thought Facebook was designed to give the social media platform as the product, and that they themselves were the customers, the reality is far different. The truth is that the advertisers were the actual customers, and Facebook users were the actual product. Very much like the Matrix, isn’t it? We are fed a social media mental “pudding,” and in return we give Facebook hours and hours of our attention… which it then sells to the advertisers.
Understandably, this realization came as a shock to those who were able to see and understand this revelation. Many users still do not grasp the reality of the situation, and are happily, mindlessly eating the pudding.
Leaving aside the distasteful mental image this business model give us, it created a problem for up-and-coming, and smaller but established Social Media companies. The smaller SM operations were left in a bit of a financial quandary… advertisers were loathe to spend on smaller platforms, because the reach of the giant platforms was so large and all inclusive. The remainder were basically crumbs on the floor.
From this basic problem… and the ensuing economic reality… came the idea for Kin.
Monetization is a concept that no one really enjoys talking about. For most of us, we’ve come to accept that ads are a necessary evil that we pay attention to in order to receive content; at this point most of us simply grit our teeth and press on. No, I’m never ever going to buy that silly spray to cover up the smell of your poo, but go ahead, play the damned video ad… again. I digress.
But what if there was a way to change the dynamic so that the SM platform user’s attention was no longer the product that got sold to monetize the operation? What if the user could sell his or her OWN attention, and be rewarded thusly? And what if there was a way to compensate developers and businesses who work in the ecosystem for this activity as well?
What if the user actually became a rewarded participant in the engine that generated income? And was even able to generate income for themselves in the process? What if a system was designed to reward users, developers and investors, all at the same time?
This is the basic premise of Kin.
THE GENESIS of KIN
In 2009, Kik Interactive was formed by a group of college students at the University of Waterloo, Canada, in order to create applications for mobile devices and smartphones. Soon thereafter, the Kik Messenger was launched. In it’s first fifteen days, Kik enrolled over one million users. Over the years, Kik has solidified itself as a strong niche player in the messaging app world. Initially, Kik monetized itself by placing advertisements, but realized over time that ad revenue might not be the best way to keep Kik in solvent.
After several years of struggle, Kik embarked on an experiment and instituted a program called “Kik Points.” This program allowed Kik users to participate in a very basic and limited “earn and spend” program. The users would answer surveys, or watch videos, in order to “earn” Kik Points… which they could then spend on in-app programs like sticker packs or emojis. What the Kik folks saw was a very enthusiastic, large group of people working to earn, and then spend Kik Points, in a transactional rate and density that dwarfs that of every cryptocurrency, including Bitcoin.
Kik then knew it was onto something. The team got to work, and after years of design, Kin was born. The Kin token was introduced into the crypto universe through an ICO (initial coin offering).
The Basics of Kin
Kin is the first cryptocurrency designed for mass-adoption and utility. It was engineered, specifically, to act as a currency to be used in millions of daily small and micro-transactions. In other words, it was a coin designed to be “spent” by the masses, not held by speculators.
Kin is designed to reward people for using the coin. The Kin Rewards Engine (KRE) pays Kin to users and developers who contribute to the ecosystem. This does “inflate” the circulating supply of the coin, which in turn keeps the value of the individual coins in check, but in reality this is a core design component of Kin. Kin is designed to grow in value, but is designed to grow more slowly because of the extreme volatility witnessed in the growth of other coins. This kind of volatility would destroy Kin’s ability to be used as a true currency. The KRE serves two purposes, then; to reward those who boost the ecosystem thought their efforts, and to moderate the extreme peaks and valleys that have plagued cryptocurrency since the invention of Bitcoin.
Bitcoin, for example, has morphed into a “store of wealth” rather than an actual usable currency. It is “deflationary” in nature; in other words, the scarcity of it is the sole driver of it’s value. The high cost of Bitcoin transactions, extreme value fluctuations and slow processing speed all hinder its use as a true currency. Additionally, why would someone spend Bitcoin when it may appreciate significantly in a short period of time? We all have heard the story about the two pizzas that were bought with 40,000 BTC… which would make those two pizzas worth over $300 million dollars today. And why would a merchant accept a currency that might lose a large percentage of it’s value very quickly? With a deflationary, speculative currency like Bitcoin, swings of plus or minus 30 to 50% within a few days are not uncommon.
Kin, on the other hand, is designed to be used and spent by millions of users. It’s value will also grow significantly, but that growth will be relatively stable, with few of the huge peaks and valleys we’ve all seen in other cryptocurrencies. This is directly due to the large initial supply of Kin tokens (756 billion) the large maximum supply (10 trillion) and the design of the KRE. Most people with any crypto experience see that 10 trillion figure (the maximum circulating supply of Kin) to be a huge detriment at first blush. This is because they haven’t grasped the need for that many tokens. Looking at it from the perspective of other crypto, 10T coins is a ludicrous, astronomical number of coins. And with any other coin, it would bake no sense.
But Kin is unique. It’s a true currency, not a store of wealth. It is designed to create value growth through usage, not through speculative buying, selling and holding. When Kin reaches mass adoption, the larger supply of coins will keep the price of the coin relatively stable while it grows in value, and will significantly reduce volatility.
Notice that I did not say that the large supply will reduce appreciation; it won’t. That’s because while Kin is designed to be an inexpensive coin, and should never experience the volatility of Bitcoin, that doesn’t mean it won’t gain and accumulate value. It most definitely will. There are no limits to that appreciation, and those who buy Kin now, while the price is well below 1/100ths of a cent, will see significant return on their investment. That opportunity, as significant as it is, is not going to last much longer, and will not be available again.
Kin is designed to go against the “normal” crypto path of pump and dump. It is not designed for arbitrage trading. Again, it is designed for utility, to be earned and spent, unlike most cryptocurrencies.
Kin is designed to be an inflationary coin, not a deflationary coin. In that, I mean that Kin, through the KRE, injects liquidity into the ecosystem and does not appreciate solely due to its scarcity. The KRE rewards those who have significant positive effect on the ecosystem by awarding Kin to those entities or people. If you develop an app that captures people’s imaginations and is wildly successful (think PokemonGo), and you’re using Kin to monetize that app, that effect on the Kin Ecosystem will be greatly rewarded with equivalent Kin. By injecting this liquidity into the ecosystem, the KRE rewards those who make the ecosystem work. This also tends to have an inflationary effect that slows the growth of the coin into a manageable upward trajectory, versus a hyperbolic, exponential increase.
Bitcoin, on the other hand, is deflationary… which means that no new BTC will be brought into the BTC system, and its value is based solely on that perceived scarcity. Since it has no mass adoption or real utility, and it’s value can rise and fall very quickly in large amounts. People buy Bitcoin for two reasons only today; speculation, and movement of fiat currencies into other cryptocurrencies. Speculation is the reason most people get into cryptocurrencies; with the advent of Kin, that will no longer be the case. Once Kin begins mass adoption, the majority of people in cryptocurrencies will be in Kin, and will be using, earning and spending Kin without buying the coin on an exchange. They will not be speculators, they will be users.
Speculation has been the name of the crypto game in the past, of course, but that is about to change. Speculation on crypto will become the minority use case, not the majority. Bitcoin will always have a place, obviously, but can you buy groceries with it? Can you pay your electric bill? Can you go out to eat using Bitcoin? No. Bitcoin will always be the first cryptocurrency, but it is not a mass-adoptable currency with any single, strong use case in its current form. Kin was designed with Bitcoin’s failings in mind.
The question comes up: Will Kin ever be a truly valuable coin, even with a ten trillion coin supply? The answer is an emphatic YES, it will. It will never be a short-term investment; there will be no 10x tomorrow, or 100x next week. But for the patient, the growth is coming. For the long term HODLer, the rewards will be significant indeed.
Let me explain why the Kin Foundation, in designing Kin, chose to make the circulating supply 10 trillion Kin tokens.
Why are there 10 Trillion Kin?
To be a true currency with mass adoption, used by millions of people, there needs to be a large amount of Kin available. Otherwise, in very short order, people would be using Kin in decimals. It was decided that people would rather earn and spend multiples of Kin (i.e., 1000 Kin or 500 Kin) versus decimals of Kin (i.e., 0.0001 Kin or 0.0005 Kin), as is now necessary with Bitcoin, Ethereum and many others. Note that Kin can also be used in decimal divisions, so that in the future, the value of Kin will never be limited by an inability to be used by the decimal.
In order to tamp down the extremely volatile nature of many cryptocurrencies, a larger circulating and available supply is necessary. A balance was found at 10T where the supply is large enough to meet the needs of the millions of users, but was small enough to not interfere with the growth of value in the coin. The Kin Rewards Engine (KRE) is key to this balance. By injecting Kin liquidity into the ecosystem, it rewards those who enable and grow the system, but it also minimizes volatility and keeps value growth down to a sustainable, non-hyperbolic/non-exponential growth curve. In this, it both creates opportunity and eases fears of volatility, for users, developers and merchants alike.
There are currently 756 billion Kin tokens in circulation; most of the remainder are held by the Kin Foundation for their own use, and for rewarding those who enable the ecosystem via the KRE. The KRE is schedule to begin operation in Q3 2018. As the value of Kin appreciates, the number of Kin injected via the KRE will change, though the total value will not. For this reason, the KRE stands to be in operation, injecting liquidity, rewarding innovation and ecosystem enhancement and controlling volatility for many, many years to come.
In the end, 10 trillion coins will not be enough to satisfy the long term needs and desires of the masses. If 50 million people are using Kin, this works out to only 200,000 Kin available per user. Most early adoptecapitalists in the ecosystem hold many, many more than that. This eventual scarcity will drive the value of Kin up significantly; I won’t prognosticate how high. There is, however, no limiting factor. I am very bullish at this prospect… because of the last item, number 5.
Metcalfe's Law shows the correlation between the usage of a telecommunications system, the size of it’s network, and its value. As the number of users grow, this law shows us that there is a direct correlation between the supply, the number of transactions per day, and the approximate value of that coin. This law follows closely the movement of Bitcoin, Ethereum and other cryptocurrency systems, and shows that Kin will benefit from mass adoption and millions of daily transactions from tens or hundreds of millions of users. Without a large supply, this would not be possible.
The design of Kin requires 10 Trillion coins to be available to execute the plan. And the plan is to allow users, developers and investors to all reap the benefits of a vibrant and growing ecosystem. When there are hundreds of millions of users in the ecosystem, the value of Kin will be greater than most people can imagine. It’s an exciting time, to be sure!
So we’ve looked at why the circulating supply is important, and why it’s different from other currencies. Let’s look at the center of why this works, the KRE.
The Kin Rewards Engine: How it will disrupt Social Media monetization
How often do you log onto YouTube, or Facebook, or any other Social Media site, and click on a video you’d like to see? Before the video starts, though, you are forced to watch an advertisement… maybe it’s something you want to know more about, but more often than not, it isn’t.
What if someone was reading your chat messages and saw you were talking about buying new running shoes, and there’s the ad for that, placed right in your face. Currently, the harvesting of your personal and private conversations is real and ongoing… putting that aside (and that’s a wholly different problem that Kin solves), someone is making money by scraping your personal data off of private communications and browsing histories, creating ads that target your interests, and then forcing you to watch those advertisements. A bot is reading your data, intuiting your thoughts, and someone profiting off of you.
George Orwell’s “1984” called this person “Big Brother.”
The KRE puts an end to this exploitative monetization model. The advertiser compensates you directly for viewing that advertisement, or answering that ad, or for playing that game. You can then spend your Kin on spend opportunities like branded Gift Cards from hundreds of big named merchants like Amazon, McDonalds, and Best Buy, or the user can take their Kin to an exchange and sell it for the fiat currency of their choice, US Dollars, Euros, GBP or Yen. You can use your Kin to buy music, to view curated content, or to tip a content provider. Paywalls for online journalism will become a thing of the past.
The KRE will reward the developer or person or company who placed the ad and contributed to the ecosystem. The user is allowed to contribute financially to content they value; instead of having their personal information sold to an advertiser. The user also can benefit financially for their own intellectual efforts and content creation.
Businesses and developers will be able to easily move their Kin to exchanges to trade for fiat currency; this enables them to pay bills and salaries, and reinvest in other parts of their business. This also creates liquidity for exchange trading, which is an important part of the Kin Ecosystem.
In this way, the KRE will rewards users, developers and investors who participate by adding value to the ecosystem. It will be an “open” ecosystem, allowing people to choose their use of Kin, whether it be purchases within apps, soft monetization via giftcards, or hard monetization via exchange trading for fiat currency. It may also become an option for game fans, hobby coders and enthusiasts to produce a living income via Kin.
Why are there two types of Kin?
Initially, Kin was designed to exist on a single blockchain infrastructure, the Ethereum Blockchain. Kin’s ICO was performed on the ETH Blockchain, and all Kin currently available to buy on exchanges are ERC20 tokens, built around Ethereum.
Last year, Ethereum experienced significant delays in transaction times because of a game that had been built on the platform, called “CryptoKitties.” This game became very popular very quickly with Crypto fans, and in their exuberance, their usage crashed the Ethereum platform.
The Kin Foundation realized that Ethereum, in its current form, was neither fast enough, nor robust enough to support the millions of users of Kin. Something had to be done.
The Foundation decided to seek another blockchain for Kin. Something faster, stronger, and secure enough for the millions of users of Kin to have near instantaneous, secure transactions, no matter what. A couple of solutions were found: The Stellar Lumens blockchain (XLM) was chosen because of it’s transaction speed, utility and robust nature, and the Orbs blockchain, which can stand as a replacement if there is a problem with Stellar down the road.
But what about exchanges? Kin on Ethereum can expect to be on many exchanges, and that access to liquidity that is essential to the success of the project. Kin on Lumens or on Orbs wouldn’t have widespread access to exchanges. This was a dilemma, The solution was to create the first ever two-blockchain cryptocurrency.
All Kin bought and sold on exchanges is on the Ethereum blockchain. Kin to be used in the KRE, the Kik app and the Kinit app, and in the remainder of the Kin Ecosystem, will be based on the Stellar Lumens blockchain. The two types of Kin will be functionally identical in value, and freely interchangeable between the two blockchains.
Basically, users will earn and spend Kin (XLM) in the Kin Ecosytem, due to Stellar’s robust design and fast transaction speed, but when they wish to move their Kin to an exchange, their Kin (XLM) will be exchanged for Kin (ETH) on a 1 for 1 basis prior to moving the Kin to the exchange of their choice for trading purposes.
In this way, the needs of all Kin users will be met. And should Stellar be someday unable to meet the demands of mass adoption, the Orbs Blockchain, and others, are available for later development. In any event, this dichotomy of Kin will be mostly transparent to the user, and will not impact the value or the utility of the currency.
The Kin Foundation has developed this dual-blockchain technology so that Kin can become the first mass-adopted, widely used cryptocurrency in the world.
So, how much will Kin be worth?
This is a big question. Many naysayers don’t believe Kin will appreciate significantly because of the large supply. This is based on their past experiences with Cryptos that don’t have utility and are simply speculative in nature. That’s not the case with Kin.
To be completely honest, no one knows how much appreciation Kin will experience, or when it will reach a certain value. Here’s what we do know:
Kin is positioned to be the first mass-adoption cryptocurrency in the world. Today, less than six million people worldwide own or use and cryptocurrency… this is an astonishingly low number. Kik, the messaging app behind Kin, has over 300 million registered users. Kin will be introduced first on the Kik app; Kik app users will have their first opportunities to earn and spend Kin before the end of 2018.
So basically, once Kin is introduced on the Kik app later this year, the number of people using cryptocurrency worldwide will multiply many times. In one day. Kik will introduce crypto to tens of millions of users by the end of the year.
As mentioned before, Metcalfe’s Law shows the relationship between a cryptocurrency value and the usage or transactions conducted by that coin, and the circulating supply. With current supply at 756 billion, and assuming transaction numbers in the 10 million per day range, Kin should be trading at around $0.01 per coin. Remember, however, that the KRE will be raising the circulating supply, and it may take some time to get to 10 million transactions per day. The value of Kin hinges on these numbers. In this, the beginning of the ecosystem, there is no foolproof way to estimate the value of Kin on any certain day.
That said, there is no limit to the value of the coin, over time. None. Not circulating supply, or market capitalization, or anything else. No limit. In a decade, after the ecosystem has matured and is operating solidly, Kin could be worth…. Well, you fill in your own numbers. I have my opinions, and they are not limited by the number of coins, the market cap or anything else designed into the coin. For me, it all hinges on mass adoption and usage.
Partnerships
Kin has inked a number of partnerships that are exciting and will stand the ecosystem well into the future. Two recently announced partnerships are UNITY and BLACKHAWK NETWORK.
UNITY
Unity is the ultimate game development platform. It brings together developers and technical assets in ways that allow the creation of some of the world’s most popular digital games. There were 5 billion downloads of games made with Unity in Q3 2016 alone. Today, games that were made with Unity exist on 2.5 billion unique mobile devices.
App and game developers will be able to insert Kin’s “5 minute SDK” (Software development kit) into the code of their app or game, and be monetizing their efforts with Kin in minutes. This “plug and play” approach makes the Kin Ecosystem and its rewards accessible to almost every developer, without the expense, time and research of developing a cryptocurrency. It truly is bringing cryptocurrency to the masses.
Simply plug the “5 minute SDK” into your code, launch/update it, and within minutes, you’re creating revenue. Your users will also have earn/spend opportunities, and your game/app usage will grow dramatically. No more sharing your revenue with the Apple App Store, or with Google Play Store. This is a huge increase in revenue for developers.
BLACKHAWK
Blackhawk Networks is the leading gift card supplier. Simply put, if you’ve ever used a gift card, it most probably came from Blackhawk Networks; that’s how deep their market goes. Over 250 different branded gift cards will be available for developers to choose from for their users to select, based on their personal knowledge of the demographic. Is your app a traffic or mapping app? Perhaps your users would appreciate being able to earn Kin to buy a Dunkin Donuts cash card. Because, coffee. Is your app a fitness app? Perhaps a Nike gift card is more appropriate. Is it a game geared towards younger users? There’s always McDonalds. A dating app? How about a card for flower delivery?
You can see that the options are endless. And don’t forget, the user AND the developer can choose to move their kin to other apps for other options, or to large cryptocurrency exchanges, where they can exchange their Kin for dollars, euros, etc.
In this way, the ecosystem is enhanced, the cycle begins again, and the KRE continues to reward.
Big Investors
One of the things that first got me excited about Kin was learning that Kik and Kin were heavily invested in by Tencent, the Chinese behemoth company behind WeChat. I travel extensively to China for my day job, and it was an incredible realization to see that most Chinese don’t carry paper currency anymore. Hundreds of millions of Chinese use WeChat every day to purchase everyday things like food, movies, clothing and the like. WeChat connects to the user’s bank account, and instantaneously debits the accounts when the user makes a purchase. Many retail outlets and vending machines in China no longer accept credit cards, and fiat purchases are dwindling in number.
Tencent’s interest in Kin is significant. Imagine Kik, using Kin, evolving into something similar… with hundreds of millions of people using Kin to conduct a significant amount of the economic transactions in their daily life! The adoption and utility numbers are mind boggling.
Additionally, there are a number of heavy hitters in the Crypto space investment community. Union Square Ventures (USV) is an investment fund that has bet heavily on Kik, and thereby, on Kin. Other investments from USV include CoinBase, Koko, DuckDuckGo, CodeAcademy, DuoLingo, Wattpad, SoundCloud, Foresquare, Kickstarter, Meetup, Etsy, Disqus, Tumblr, Twitter and Zynga. As you can see, Kin is extremely well positioned, and the monetization opportunity Kin represents for these companies is being explored.
Wrapping it all up in a big red bow…
The TL;DR version is this: Kin is poised to become the most used cryptocurrency in existence in 2018. As the KRE comes online, Kin is introduced to the Kik Community, the discrete Kin app (Kinit App) is released, the 5-minute SDK is finalized, more partnerships come online, more and major exchanges offer Kin trading, and word spreads, expect the value of Kin to begin growing significantly.
Kin currently sits near the bottom of the top 100 cryptocurrencies in terms of market capitalization, but the expectation is that Kin will rise towards the top of the top 100 in short order. As the value increases, so does market cap. Don’t make the mistake of thinking market capitalization limits the growth of Kin in any way; it will be the usage and mass adoption that will grow the value.
As the crypto market recovers from the last few months, look for Kin to accelerate its growth as more partnerships and exchanges are announced. Once the KRE begins operations, the value of Kin will grow more quickly. I do not expect Kin ever be worth less than it is right now.
The future for Kin is extremely bright. The Kin Foundation has much work left to do, but they are up to the task. Stay informed, and make sure your portfolio has Kin in it!
submitted by hiker2mtn to KinFoundation [link] [comments]

How much does it cost to mine 1 Bitcoin? Bitcoin - What Is The Cost Of Mining? Is bitcoin worth investing in? - Quora Fundamentals Explained Is BITCOIN MINING Profitable RIGHT NOW In Mid 2019? how to convert BTC bitcoin to gbp real money

he CoinDesk Bitcoin Calculator converts bitcoin into any world currency using the Bitcoin Price Index, including USD, GBP, EUR, CNY, JPY, and more. The value of Bitcoin, like all currencies, is determined by how much people are willing to exchange it for. The value of Bitcoin has fluctuated wildly since they were introduced and have reached a How Much is Bitcoin Worth Today? Convert BTC to GBP The value of Bitcoin is constantly on the move, meaning your BTC wallet's GBP balance is shifting often as well. You can use our BTC/GBP conversion tool for more. Mining Bitcoin in UK. Mining Bitcoin in the UK is anything but a good idea. GBP [Pound Sterling] BTC [Bitcoin] 0.01 Pound Sterling = 0.000001 Bitcoin: 0.1 Pound Sterling = 0.000014 Bitcoin: 1 Pound Sterling = 0.000137 Bitcoin: 2 Pound Sterling = 0.000274 Bitcoin: 3 Pound Sterling = 0.000410 Bitcoin: 5 Pound Sterling = 0.000684 Bitcoin: 10 Pound Sterling = 0.001368 Bitcoin: 20 Pound Sterling = 0.002735 Bitcoin: 50 Pound Convert 1 Bitcoin to British Pound. Get live exchange rates, historical rates & charts for XBT to GBP with XE's free currency calculator.

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How much does it cost to mine 1 Bitcoin?

Bitcoin is going to have an extremely deciding year in 2019. If the price goes below 2600, this will be the biggest crash in Bitcoin's history. If the market stays bearish after January 26th, 2019 ... get a chance to win $100 bitcoin each month by 1. liking video! 2. ... video titles are my own opinion and should not be taken as factual or at face value. i currently hold investments in stocks ... In this video I explain Bitcoin mining, the costs involved & whether it puts a floor in the price of Bitcoin & other cryptocurrencies. How much does it actually cost to mine Bitcoin. #Bitcoin # ... get a chance to win $100 bitcoin each month by 1. liking video! ... video titles are my own opinion and should not be taken as factual or at face value. i currently hold investments in stocks ... SUBSCRIBE FOR MORE HOW MUCH - http://shorturl.at/arBHL Visit our Bitcoin Merch Store - http://www.bitcoinmerch.com *Don't forget to subscribe and hit that no...

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